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"What is a 'genuine' didgeridoo?" "What is an 'authentic' didgeridoo?" "What is a 'traditional' didgeridoo?" "What is an 'Aboriginal' didgeridoo?"

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DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

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ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Name and Country

What is a 'genuine' didgeridoo?

What is an 'authentic' didgeridoo?

What is a 'traditional' didgeridoo?

What is an 'Aboriginal' didgeridoo?

Anonymous In my opinion, it doesn't add much to actual use of the didj if it is told to be "genuine" or "authentic". A more concrete feature would be the sound and quality of the instrument. In my opinion, it doesn't add much to actual use of the didj if it is told to be "genuine" or "authentic". A more concrete feature would be the sound and quality of the instrument. I suppose it would be a didj made of wood hollowed by termites or such. Not the kind of plastic or box didjes which have been developed afterwards. It is a didgeridoo made, used and owned by an aboriginal person.
Aaron from New Zealand Native made Native made Magic wand Magic wand
Anonymous from USA One made by an actual Australian aboriginal craftsman. One made by an actual Australian aboriginal craftsman. One made by an actual Australian aboriginal craftsman. One made by an actual Australian aboriginal craftsman.
Anonymous from United Kingdom One that has been hollowed out naturally by termites One made by aboriginal people One as used by aboriginal people One made and decorated by aboriginal people
Ahmed from United Kingdom Hand made buy a professional Handmade buy a lineage of didgeridoo makers Handmade buy a lineage of didgeridoo makers A healing and spiritual musical instrument
Alberto Bitto from Italy Genuine didgeridoos are termite hollowed. Authentic didgeridoos are painted genuine didgeridoos. Traditional didgeridoos are made of termite hollowed eucalyptus wood. Aboriginal didgeridoos are traditional didgeridoos made by Aboriginal craftsmen.
Alejandro Dominguez from Mexico A termite hollowed didgeridoo Its a didgeridoo that is really a didgeridoo not some other instrument. A didgeridoo made to follow the traditions of aboriginal people. A didgeridoo made by aboriginal people.
Alex Eastburn from USA A tree branch hollowed out by white ants. A tree branch hollowed out naturally and finished by an Aborigine. A tree branch hollowed out by white ants. A tree branch hollowed out white ants and finished by an Aborigine.
Anonymous One that is made to the spec of an authentic didgeridoo, but not necessarily authentic. One that is made from an aboriginal in Australia. One that comes from the culture and home of the didgeridoo - basic features - One made from an aboriginal - or perhaps it's a copy of a traditional one - for selling purposes a company may use "aboriginal" to sound authentic.
Anonymous from Chile These three terms are only used with a commercial use. there are only one term that con be used and it depends of the tribe who is using these instrument. These three terms are only used with a commercial use. there are only one term that con be used and it depends of the tribe who is using these instrument. These three terms are only used with a commercial use. there are only one term that con be used and it depends of the tribe who is using these instrument. These three terms are only used with a commercial use. there are only one term that con be used and it depends of the tribe who is using these instrument.
Anonymous It works the way that the original didgeridoo was intended - in other words, it's not another instrument, dressed up to look like a didgeridoo. It has the same homeland as the original didgeridoos, made in the same process. Traditional, to me, would mean that no modern technologies have been used to change the manufacturing process. To me, that's like calling a pizza "Italian." Are there other types of didgeridoos other than "Aboriginal"?
Ana Buchadas from Portugal Made by Australian Aboriginal people Made by Australian Aboriginal people Made by Australian Aboriginal people Made by Australian Aboriginal people
Andrea from USA Real, not a copy Real or natural aboriginal What has been used by aborigines for centuries It is originally from australia
Andrew Hodge from Canada Termite carved, aboriginal designed. Same as above Same as above Same as above
Andrew from Australia Made of Australian timber Made in Australia Made by Traditional Owners Made and decorated by Traditional Owners
Andrew from Australia Made genuine as in workmanship quality The real deal. Comes the real aborigines from australia Hollowed out naturally by white ants and hand crafted,the way the aborigines have traditionally have done for years All of above
Andrew from USA Presumably, genuine mean the real deal. Same I would be more suspicious of this title, thinking it is in the traditional style. Made by aboriginal people.
Anonymous A real instrument made by native aboriginals Authentic means its not a replica or fake.. A didgeridoo made in the tradition of aboriginals. A didgeridoo made by aboriginals.
Andy from Ireland A genuine didgeridoo is a concept of the western world. Authentic traditional didgeridoo instruments are made from eucalyptus tree trunks or branches which have been hollowed naturally by termites and would be made in an area where instruments are traditional made not some semi industrial area Authentic traditional didgeridoo instruments are made from eucalyptus tree trunks or branches which have been hollowed naturally by termites and would be made in an area where instruments are traditional made not some semi industrial area Authentic traditional didgeridoo instruments are made from eucalyptus tree trunks or branches which have been hollowed naturally by termites and would be made in an area where instruments are traditional made not some semi industrial area
Andy from USA Made by aboriginal artisans Made by aboriginal artisans Made by aboriginal artisans Made by aboriginal artisans
Anonymous Made out of wood by Aboriginal artists. Eucalyptus wood, termite-hollowed. Hand painted, not sealed. Designed and made by Aboriginal artists.
Anonymous from Finland Naturally hollowed by termites. Simple kind of didge. Made by Aboriginals back in the days. The ones that Aboriginals use nowadays.
Anonymous A termite, hollowed, eucalyptus tree crafted by Aboriginal's of high quality. A termite, hollowed, eucalyptus tree crafted by Aboriginal's. One crafted in the same style, but may not be Aboriginal. One made by an Aboriginal.
Barry Adams from United Kingdom Is a didgeridoo made of original materials from the country of origin. An authentic didgeridoo is made from termite hollowed wood by an indigenous artist. Traditional is made using traditional arts and crafts from the country of origin. An aboriginal didgeridoo is a combination of all the above made by an aboriginal artist using local crafts and materials.
Anonymous from USA One that makes sound One that is termite hollowed One that is termite hollowed in Australia One that is collected and detailed by an aboriginal artist
Bart from Netherlands One that is made from Eucalyptus and hollowed out by termites. One that comes from an "Island" called Australia and is made by indigenous people. One that is used in ceremonies with Bullroarers, clapsticks and story telling by the fire. A type, that sounds different. Well, the way its played is different the 'old school' way. To me it looks more difficult to play the didgeridoo the way a true Aboriginal player does it the traditional way.
Betsy Sauther from USA One that vibrates and makes sound? It's dicey because if it doesn't say "aboriginal australian" along with that then it's not conveying the true origins to me. This one evokes more of an image of an australian didgeridoo, or a eucalyptus didgeridoo. This one makes me think that it was made by an australian aborigine from eucalyptus.
Anonymous from USA Made by aboriginal people of Australia who know how to do it best. Same answer as above. The instrument the people themselves play. Same answer as above.
Bjorn Restad/former Noremsaune from Norway Made from termite hollowed wood Made in australia Made by australian Aboriginals Made by aboriginals and decorated with earth colours
Anonymous Not fake Same as above and below Implies that it is made in the "traditional" way Made by a person of aboriginal descent.
Anonymous One that is constructed in a way to be used as traditionally used to play the kind of music traditionally played. Same as above Same as above An Aboriginal didgeridoo is one that is made by an Aboriginal.
Bob from Canada I would have to guess that it would be a termite hollowed one One that is termite hollowed and collected by an aboriginal person One collected using sustainable methods I honestly do not know
Brad Lackey from USA Aboriginal made, termite hollowed, cleaned and decorated in traditional motifs (painted or burned). Doesn't mean much to me. Could be any type of instrument that can be played like a didgeridoo. Traditional means hardwood and painted to look like it is made by Aboriginal artists. May or may not be Aboriginal made. This should mean an Aboriginal artist made and decorated the instrument.
Branden Parker from USA Made of traditional materials and in a traditional way. Same as genuine. Same as authentic. As opposed to a non-Aboriginal one.
Brenda Lacourciere from Canada Locally made by artisans. Truly made by who they say they are. Dates back centuries. Made by the native peoples.
Brendan Moloney from Spain Its from an Aboriginal region. From a termite hollowed tree which is classified as didgeridoo wood and treated and tested by someone who is a professional didgeridoo maker. Original style didgeridoo that isn't fabricated with same style. A didgeridoo style that is used by the Aboriginal people. A less treated didgeridoo. More rustic looking. Not made for tourism sales.
Anonymous A didgeridoo that can produce sounds. A didgeridoo that is hollowed out by termites. A didgeridoo made within Australia out of a particular tree branch. A didgeridoo that has been traditionally painted.
Brian from USA Eucalyptus, created by termites Eucalyptus, created by termites, using natural materials (i.e. natural wax for the mouthpiece) used by Aboriginal people to make didgeridoos. Eucalyptus, created by termites, using natural materials (i.e. natural wax for the mouthpiece) used by Aboriginal people to make didgeridoos. Traditional painting (i.e. no 'modern' painting) Created by artists of Aboriginal descent. Eucalyptus, created by termites, using natural materials (i.e. natural wax for the mouthpiece) used by Aboriginal people to make didgeridoos. Traditional painting (i.e. no 'modern' painting)
Anonymous from USA Made in the same way that aboriginal instruments are made. Indistinguishable in tone from an aboriginal instrument. Same as genuine. Doesn't mean anything. Made by aborigines using their traditional methods.
Bruce from Australia Tubular instrument made from bamboo or a mostly termite-hollowed (some additional hollowing is necessary) tree branch, with mouth piece shaped from bees wax or resin. As above As above, but made by or under the supervision of, an Aboriginal craftsman As above
Bryan Scotson-smith from United Kingdom Made from Aussie trees, eaten out by termites Made by aboriginal people As above As above
Camilo from Chile A genuine djaloo is the one 100% handcrafted and painted in Australia (northern parts) by aboriginal people, made of a type of eucalyptus, and hollowed naturally by termites. An authentic djaloo has practically the same meaning as genuine, so, the definition would be the same as genuine for me. For me, a traditional djaloo has the same characteristics described in the genuine djaloo, but the difference resides maybe on the type of painting, because I saw many djaloos with custom themes, but the traditional ones are painted with traditional aboriginal art. An aboriginal djaloo has the same characteristics of the first definition (genuine), because I think that to be genuine, it must be created by the traditional ways of crafting, and of course, by aboriginal people, the creators of this amazing and beautiful instrument.
Candy from USA A branch from certain trees that is eaten out by termites. I don't know all the good woods, but the eucalyptus tree is one and I want to say blackwood? And of course it should be "found" by an aboriginal person who knocks on these branches to "hear" if it is a good branch or not. One that is found and made by an Aboriginal person Hmm...dunno..see answer from above. One that is found and made by an Aboriginal person
Cari from USA Too ambiguous of a word...don't know Termite hollowed Made from wood vs glass or plastic A didj owned by an Aboriginal:)
Carlos Guillermo from Mexico Maybe a didgeridoo made of termite hollowed eucalyptus branch A didgeridoo made in australia, with hollowed termite branch by aborigines Maybe a didgeridoo made by the local artist from australia, with dot painting and culture messages in his deign A didgeridoo made by australian aborigines, that defines a particular clan, and method to create it
Carmelo from Spain Made with the traditional arts With aboriginal techniques With the soul of a australian nations The essence of human sounds
Anonymous from Australia Made from hollowed out eucalypt Made from termite and fire hollowed eucalypt One used by aboriginal people for cultural business One made by aboriginal people
Anonymous I don't know. one constructed (shaped from wood) in the way an Aboriginal person would, traditionally? I don't know. one made by an Aboriginal person? I don't know. one constructed (shaped from wood) and decorated according to traditional practice? I don't know, but I suspect not necessarily one made by an Aboriginal person!
Anonymous Termite bored eucalypt branch crafted by an aboriginal artist Made by aboriginal people Should be a termite bored eucalypt branch Didj crafted by an aboriginal artist
Charley from USA One made in Australia by Aboriginal people. One made in Australia, but Aboriginals, of local materials. One that looks like a genuine one. One made by Aboriginals?
Chelsea from USA A high quality Didgeridoo that is made in Australia and is not created just to look at but to actually be played. Sounds to me like this is one that was made generations ago and would be past down through the family of and Aboriginal tribe of Australia. One that can be made by anyone and is played often by those who are not necessarily part of an Aboriginal tribe? Or can be a common Didgeridoo that is made and/or played by Aborigines but is not the quality of the genuine didgeridoo. One made and played by and Aboriginal, especially in rituals. Perhaps made many years ago.
Anonymous A 'real' didgeridoo, one that works. Made by the indigenous people who developed and still play the didgeridoo with traditional symbols, paints, methods of fabrication, and philosophy In my mind, the same as authentic In my mind, the same as authentic
Anonymous Made from termite-hollowed timber Australian. Made in the Aboriginal tradition. Made by Aboriginal people.
Christian from USA Made naturally from eucalyptus with traditional techniques and not power tools. A didgeridoo that is designed for playability A didgeridoo that is made out of natural materials like eucalyptus and not out of metal or plastics Made by the aboriginal people.
Christopher from United Kingdom A didgeridoo made with with the right materials. A didgeridoo made in a typically aboriginal way. A didgeridoo which was made and sounds like didgeridoos of past generations. A didgeridoo made by Aborigines.
Christopher from USA A "hand tool" hollowed out didj stick. A "hand tool" hollowed out didj stick. A "hand tool" hollowed out didj stick. A "termite" hollowed out didj stick.
Clement from France Termite hollowed Made of australian eucalyptus Yidaki made by aboriginal for ceremonies Yidaki made by aboriginal
Anonymous Made by aboriginals Looks like a genuine one Depends on whose tradition Should be made by aboriginals
Anonymous from Australia An instrument that has been made by non aboriginal people. Is an instrument that has been hollowed out by termites and then cleaned and tuned up by an Aboriginal Is an instrument that has been hollowed out by termites and then cleaned and tuned up by an Aboriginal and only used for ceremonies An overseas copy. Possible made of bamboo
Cory from USA I would say that 'genuine' is a didgeridoo that is made by termites but not necessarily eucalyptus. 'authentic' refers to made by an Aboriginal. A didge made from a eucalyptus branch and made by termites. Made in Australia.
Curt from USA A hollowed out log created by termites, harvested by a professional, and tuned. Same as above One harvested by an Aboriginal Harvested by an Aboriginal, painted, and utilized for ritual as ceremony.
Anonymous One that's made out of wood, not pipe. A didj from Australia. It was made the same way as when they first made them. One an Aborigine made.
Damien Loughnane from Ireland A termite hollowed eucalyptus tree from the top of Australia, from East Arnhem land through Arnhem land and the Northern Territory and into the north east of Western Australia. A termite hollowed eucalyptus tree from the top of Australia, from East Arnhem land through Arnhem land and the Northern Territory and into the north east of Western Australia. A termite hollowed eucalyptus tree from the top of Australia, from East Arnhem land through Arnhem land and the Northern Territory and into the north east of Western Australia. A termite hollowed eucalyptus tree from the top of Australia, from East Arnhem land through Arnhem land and the Northern Territory and into the north east of Western Australia.
Anonymous from USA One made by Aboriginals peoples and from eucalyptus One made by Aboriginals peoples and from eucalyptus One made by Aboriginals peoples and from eucalyptus One made by Aboriginals peoples and from eucalyptus, with perhaps more decoration
Dan from USA To be labeled as genuine a didgeridoo should be made from termite hollowed eucalyptus trees that have been legally harvested by Aboriginal people. Basically the same as a genuine instrument, made from legally harvested termite hollowed eucalyptus. An instrument that is made of legally harvested termite hollowed eucalyptus tree. I feel it may be called a 'traditional' instrument if made of this material no matter who the maker is, but should Not be labeled as a 'genuine', or 'authentic' instrument unless it is made by an Aboriginal person. The maker should be truthfully identified. An instrument that is first and foremost made by an Aboriginal person. It should also be made from the correct material, that being legally harvested termite hollowed eucalyptus.
Daniel Cohen from USA A wooden instrument, made from a hollow branch of Eucalypt collected and honed by native Aboriginal Australians. These natives are usually of tribes originating in Northern Australia. A wooden instrument naturally hollowed by nature. Beeswax mouth piece. Made in Australia, coping genuine didgeridoo with a least the direction of native Aboriginal trades people. An wooden hollowed branch tuned and honed to produce pleasant sound. An instrument made in Australia will techniques of the Aboriginals or following their age old practices. See 'genuine'
Daniel Niles from United Arab Emirates Great questions! Probably 'genuine', 'authentic' and 'traditional' are all meaningless terms in the marketplace since they can be interpreted in many ways, especially if you add " -like" to the end of them. But if genuine means "real" then to be genuine we need to accept that genuine didjes... ...come from Australia, made by Aboriginal people, from certain trees harvested in a certain way and decorated by Aboriginal people in certain styles for "authentic" reasons. So if you don't have all of those elements to one degree:Australian eucalypt wood, made and decorated in Australia, by "traditional" Aboriginal craftsmen and artists, I don't think it should be called... Genuine, authentic, traditional or CERTAINLY not Aboriginal. I wouldn't say the same about a "flute" because there are many in many countries or diff. materials made in diff. ways, but didj is particular to Australia so I think it's safe for them to claim all of these adjectives as their right for this instrument.
Anonymous from Ireland Real didge Made by a registered maker Original design Didge used by an aboriginal person
Anonymous A didgeridoo that works One made in australia I really don't know One made by aboriginal people
Darren Searle from Australia Termite eaten eucalypts. As above A stick that has been cut with the full intention of ceremonial use. Aboriginal art.
Dave from Australia One which is made by aboriginal people using the traditional methods One which is supplied with a certificate stating the maker and method used One made from a naturally hollowed log One made by native australians
David from USA A fake sold as traditional but is imported One found and or collected in australia,by aboriginal One used for every day entertainment. One that is used by an aboriginal for his own personal use
David from Canada One made from termite-hollowed native Australian wood One made from termite-hollowed native Australian wood One that has been used by and passed on through generations of Aboriginals - an "heirloom" so, to speak. One that is made from termite-hollowed native Australian wood and modified (mouthpiece, artwork) by an Aboriginal person.
David Cook Jr from USA It was mad and crafted from the hands of people who have lived there for many many years. It's like passing down a beautiful cello or violin. I would feel very cheated if it said made in Hong Kong. I would hope made as well as the other. I would think made from craftsman who are passing down there artform. I don't know, sorry.
David from USA I wouldn't think genuine means anything Again, this would not mean anything to me. Termite hollowed eucalypt without regard to who made it Traditional didj made entirely by an Australian Aboriginal person or persons.
David from USA A genuine didgeridoo is one that is naturally hollowed out by termites, and that has not been altered through the use of chemical coatings or other treatments. An authentic didgeridoo is one that is naturally hollowed out by termites, and that has not been altered through the use of chemical coatings or other treatments. A traditional didgeridoo is one that is naturally hollowed out by termites, and that has not been altered through the use of chemical coatings or other treatments. An Aboriginal didgeridoo is one that is naturally hollowed out by termites and harvested by Aboriginal people, and that has not been altered through the use of chemical coatings or other treatments.
David from USA Made by an Aboriginal A didj that has been authenticated as Genuine Made in the traditional style, termite bored, not machine made Made by a member of a true Aboriginal tribe
Deb from USA Australian Aboriginal harvested, termite hollowed wood, painted or crafted in Aboriginal tradition and presented in the spirit of giving and sharing that unique culture See above See above See above
Anonymous from USA A real didgeridoo Made by real aboriginal's. Made the way they were made when they first started making them. It should only say that if it is made by the Aboriginal people.
Anonymous from USA ONe that is labeled and guaranteed as being made by an Australian Aboriginal. One that is naturally hollowed out by termites and made by Aboriginals. One that is termite eaten eucalyptus, as opposed to other materials. Any didgeridoo crafted by an Aboriginal person.
Debra from USA Hand crafted Made by an actual Aboriginal artist A type or style used by actual Aboriginal tribes One hand crafted by an Aboriginal artist
Anonymous This would apply to pretty much any tube that can make a sound like a didgeridoo. This would be something made using traditional Aboriginal methods but doesn't have artwork. This would be a didgeridoo made using traditional methods and also having traditional artwork. This would be a didgeridoo used by member of an Aboriginal tribe. It shouldn't be sold as a souvenir.
Derrick Jackson from USA Genuine in my words mean a handmade instrument that was labored and sweat over. Also to produce the intended sound of the didge. Authentic in my head means it came from an actual aboriginal people. Traditional to me means an instrument that has not been altered in any way to suit mainstream popularity and stay true to its roots no matter how "uncool" it is. An Aboriginal didgeridoo to me is an instrument made by the people for the people
Don Morris from USA Genuine would imply there are ones that aren't genuine, so it should have a defined meaning. A genuine didgeridoo using the term in a general sense could mean just about anything. Again authentic should have a set definition. To be authentic you must have an authenticity process. I would imagine it all depends on who's traditions it came from? A dealer in plastic pipes may have a tradition of making a didgeridoo out of plastic and glue? It would depend on the definition of Aboriginal. If you are using it to define a class of people then you need to define what groups are aboriginal in the definition. You could say that Native Americans are aboriginal, but they don't have a history of making didgeridoos. If a group of them started making didgeridoos should they be called aboriginal?
Don Randolph from USA Genuine simply means it IS a didgeridoo. Authentic means it is meant to be played and handled as a didgeridoo is meant to be. Traditional would indicate that it is made in the manner that didgeridoos were in the time period that didgeridoos date back to. Their origin. A didgeridoo made by an Aborigine or one made to the specifications that Aboriginal tribes use to make their own.
Anonymous from USA One that can actually be played as a didgeridoo, not just look like one A genuine didgeridoo that is made by an Australian Aboriginal One made by traditional methods and used as such in Aboriginal dances and ceremonies To me this seems to be the same as a traditional didgeridoo
Dustin from USA A termite hollowed euc. A termite hollowed euc from Northern AU Termite hollowed, and naturally harvested and finished didge with no power tools, often decorated with the tribes colors and art. A yidaki or Mago.
Dustin Chavez from USA A didge made from eucalyptus A didge made and crafted by aboriginal people A traditionally painted eucalyptus branch hollowed out by termites See above
Anonymous from USA It is a didgeridoo made by anyone A didgeridoo made like the original ones were made by the natives Made according to the traditions of the people who made them first Made by the aborigines of Australia
Ed Obermeyer from Us Minor Outlying Islands Made by real Aboriginal tribes with true symbolism from their ancestors. Usually made from some type of termite hollowed log, often but not always, eucalyptus. They did not have the dot patterns. They were used more for corroborees. A wind instrument that goes back thousands of years used in corroborees to communicate.
Anonymous from USA Harvested, shaped and decorated by aboriginal people in Australia See above The same as before See #1
Edward from USA Made by Aboriginal people. Made from eucalyptus branches hollowed out by termites. Made by Aboriginal people. Made from eucalyptus branches hollowed out by termites. Made by Aboriginal people. Made from eucalyptus branches hollowed out by termites. Made by Aboriginal people. Made from eucalyptus branches hollowed out by termites.
Edward Magee from Canada They should carry a certificate of authenticity, if sold as genuine Truly made by authentic people who are certified. An native didgeridoo An native aboriginal people
Elena from Italy Actually, I thought 'genuine' and 'authentic' were synonyms, meaning 'not fake/copied', then made by someone that has mastery in making them As above As used just in traditional practice, and for that purpose A didj made and used by native australian people
Elizabeth from USA An instrument that produces didj music One made in the traditional way. One that is made the traditional way by termites One made in the traditional way by native aboriginal people
Eric Boucher from Canada A branch emptied by termites, crafted by traditional ways. A didgeridoo reflecting the truth of its making and original territory. A branch emptied by termites, crafted by traditional ways. A branch emptied by termites, crafted in traditional ways by an aborigine from that territory who gathered the branch traditionally..
Eric Frisbee from USA Made from Australian woods. Made to look "genuine" but not necessarily made from native woods. I would assume one made to look like an earlier period in Aborigines culture. Custom hand made by Aboriginal People.
Erik from USA This is a didge made by Aboriginal people in the traditional manner handed down by their ancestors. Made by Aboriginal people. Made in the traditional ways of the Aboriginal people....e.g. from termite eaten trees. Made from start to finish by Aboriginal people.
Erik from Netherlands Didge with the physical characteristics of an authentic didge (made of eucalyptus wood, hollowed by termites, etc) Didge as above and further more grown from a eucalyptus tree in one of the original aboriginal regions of Australia Didge as above and further more built by an aboriginal with the craftsmanship from his ancestors Didge as above and further more in the possession of and played only by an aboriginal
Anonymous Made by Aboriginal people Hollowed by termites & made by Aboriginal people Hollowed by termites Made by Aboriginal people in Australia the traditional way
Anonymous from Portugal Is made by Aboriginal people Is made by aboriginal people It is termited and from north Australia Is made by Aboriginal people
Fernando from Argentina I think, these terms are meant to mean that a didgeridoo was made by the aboriginal people of Australia. Most times this is not true. I've had the opportunity to travel to several different countries and I've seen this kind of "traditional" items in most of them. Mostly the words genuine and authentic are used to improve, in the eyes of the customer, the quality of an item and always to enlarge it's price. Read above. I think this ward is used for the same purpose that the two above, but it could also mean, that a didgeridoo was made according to the aboriginal tradition. Same as before, but this could really mean that it was made by an aborigine.
Fred Ashplant from USA In my opinion a genuine didgeridoo is one harvested by an Aboriginal person from a eucalyptus tree that has been hollowed out by termites and then is prepared and/or decorated by an Aboriginal craftsman. One that has been produced in Australia by an Aboriginal craftsman Eucalyptus hollowed by termites crafted by Aboriginal artist Same as above
Fredrik from Sweden Don't know! Don't know! Don't know! Made and sold by an Aboriginal
Gabe from Canada A didgeridoo made of wood A termite hollowed tree Termite hollowed eucalyptus tree Termite hollowed eucalyptus tree
Anonymous One made by Aboriginals out of native wood. Same as above One made out of eucalyptus wood with bees wax mouthpiece and natural bell. One made by those who originally made them in northern Australia. Not all aboriginal tribes made and played them.
Geoff from Canada Termite hollowed Same as genuine Termite hollowed, made by native aboriginal w art work Termite hollowed, made by native aboriginal
George from Cyprus Made from eucalyptus and hollowed out by termites and hand made by an aboriginal One that's been tested and works for sure Made from eucalyptus and hollowed out by termites and hand made by an aboriginal Made from eucalyptus and hollowed out by termites and hand made by an aboriginal
Gillian from USA As opposed to a fake didgeridoo? I doubt it has any meaning really, though I would assume it has the capacity for being played to produce the traditional circular sound. One coming from Australia, rather than China or Indonesia. One made using eucalyptus that has been hollowed out by termites. One made by aboriginal people or 'made' to appear so, using traditional aboriginal painting and designs.
Gina from USA Genuine means what it says. Genuine composition, authentic artisans, traditional methods. Genuine means what it says. Genuine composition, authentic artisans, traditional methods. Genuine means what it says. Genuine composition, authentic artisans, traditional methods. Some people call their didgeridoos "aboriginal" which doesn't mean they're authentically made. It just means that it's in the style of aboriginal types.
Anonymous from USA An authentic didgeridoo that holds a symbolic meaning and/or tradition One that was found in nature that was created by the aborigine An authentic didgeridoo that holds a symbolic meaning used for traditional practices. The same thing as an authentic
Goran from Croatia/Hrvatska Didgeridoo that is hollowed by termites. Didge that is not (necessarily) made by aboriginal people, but is very alike. Didge used by aboriginal people Didge made by aboriginal people
Graeme from United Kingdom Any didgeridoo Probably from NE Arnhemland Made from euc Didgeridoo made by any indigenous person
Graham from United Kingdom Termite eaten eucalyptus, with little modification to be playable. Termite eaten eucalyptus, with little modification to be playable, made by a skilled Aboriginal person, or person sufficiently knowledgeable and trained by a skilled Aboriginal person. A didgeridoo prepared in the same way as Aboriginal ancestors did - that's what tradition means! Termite eaten eucalyptus, with little modification to be playable, made by an Aboriginal person.
Greg from USA In my opinion, that would be a instrument that was hand crafted by a master of the craft. An authentic didgeridoo would be one handcrafted, and made of eucalyptus or other native woods to australia. Not one made of bamboo or some new compound. It was crafted in the same way that it has been made for a long time. Any didgeridoo is "aboriginal" because of the fact that they created said instrument.
Guido from Netherlands I don't know, my english is not very good. What do you mean with: genuine Didgeridoo's made in Australia with termites Didgeridoo's made in Australia with termites A music instrument with a non-common sound for west-european listeners, but not a awful sound, even a relaxing sound.
Guillermo Tarin Paris from Spain One with a genuine sound Made in australia by aborigines using the right wood. Same than before Made by the traditional way and made by aboriginal hands.
Gustavo Senise from Brazil I think the genuine is the one built with the specific tree(eucalypt, I think), eaten from inside from a specie of insect (I don't remember the name of it), and painted by aboriginal hands. The same as genuine. The same as genuine. The same as genuine.
Anonymous from New Zealand A termite hollowed branch that is cut and worked to refine the sound. As above but produced in Australia by Aboriginal people. Same as 'authentic' As above
Hans from USA One that is truly crafted by Aborigines Has to be made in Australia made by original Aborigines One that is truly hand crafted by Aborigines A didgeridoo made in all the original traditional methods handcrafted and painted by Aborigines whose craft has been past down by past generations One truly made by real Aborigines
Harold Gaines from USA A didgeridoo made in the traditional style and manner and of traditional materials by Aborigines One which is made in the traditional style, materials and methods, but not necessarily by Aborigines. An instrument made from traditional woods and in the traditional styles, with traditional markings. Probably not made by Aborigines, but faithful in form. Could be anything, like an "Indian" headdress here in the US. Almost meaningless.
Anonymous A didgeridoo made from termite hollowed tree stems, usually eucalyptus. As above but made by Australian Aboriginals with a cultural connection to the didgeridoo. A didgeridoo made by select groups of Aboriginals predominantly from Arnhem Land and select northern regions of Australia whose history incorporated the didgeridoo or Yidaki throughout pre-white settlement. Unfortunately an Aboriginal didgeridoo is a label used to sell any didgeridoo made anywhere using any method and any material. It should be the same as traditional didgeridoo
Heath from USA Made by an aborigine Made by an aborigine Made by an aborigine and painted in traditional ways dating back to the aborigine's ancestral lineage markings Aren't they all supposed to be aboriginal?
Anonymous from Ireland I take it people are meant to assume it is a didge made by an Aboriginal craftsman in the traditional manner. It probably has traditional style artwork. Definitely not a guarantee of genuineness. Again people are meant to assume it's the real thing. It probably has appropriate artwork or some indicator of authenticity, but this wouldn't necessarily mean anything. However, I believe Didjshop's didges are all certified as authentic. Would imply made in the traditional style. Doesn't in itself suggest it has any authenticity, but could be taken as such. Implies it is made by an Aboriginal craftsman, but no guarantee of quality or traditional method.
Anonymous Not sure of the difference in meaning of these terms Not sure of the difference in meaning of these terms Not sure of the difference in meaning of these terms Not sure of the difference in meaning of these terms
Ian from United Kingdom A didgeridoo made from natural methods for the purpose of playing and aboriginal rituals A didgeridoo that is crafted by traditional means by aboriginal people Made by aboriginal methods with termites, hot coals etc Made by aboriginal people for the primary purpose of being an instrument and aboriginal rituals
Idan Saidi from Israel Made with termites? From the nature? With the traditional colours of the aboriginal ppls? I don't know!
Israel from USA A branch or root hollowed by termites, identified and worked simplistically One that is prepared by australian aboriginals of australian wood. One that is recognized for its sound rather than oddities. One that is crafted by them with local (AU) materials.
Ivica from Croatia/Hrvatska Genuine didge for me means that it is made out of Australia native wood and hollowed by termites. Genuine should also be made by Aboriginal artist. Authentic didge should definitely be from original termite hollowed wood. Traditional didge I think is the one made by Aboriginal person in a traditional way regarding its sound, key and paintings. It should be suitable for traditional style playing in every way. Are there any other? Everything else are copies.
Jack from USA I'm not sure about this term. To me, if it looks, sounds, and is played like a didge, then it's a real didge, regardless of how it's made or even what materials are used. And "genuine" means, to me, the same thing as "real". I guess one could have a "wall-hanging" or "toy" didge as opposed to a "genuine, playable" didge, but beyond that, this term means nothing to me. I would think it's one made with traditional materials but not NECESSARILY in a traditional manner or by an Aboriginal craftsman. To me, this implies a didge made with traditional materials and in a traditional manner, PROBABLY by an Aboriginal craftsman, but I'd want to be told that specifically. And by traditional materials and manner, I mean the way it was done before Europeans arrived in Australia. A traditional didgeridoo (as above) made by an Aboriginal craftsman.
Anonymous A Genuine didgeridoo is a piece of art that can only be crafted by a person who can appreciate the culture and history of this ancient instrument An authentic didgeridoo is a didgeridoo that can be used as an musical instrument Is a didgeridoo that is created by an artisan that has studied the Traditional style of the instrument Aboriginal didgeridoos can only resemble traditional Aboriginal didgeridoos and have to be created by an aboriginal
Jahn from USA A hollowed out, by termites, root or branch of a tree used to produce a wide range of vocalizations. Collected and tested/fashioned by an aboriginal artist. A naturally occurring termite hollowed log/branch collected by aboriginal peoples, not a made item...a collected and altered artifact of nature. In addition to above, not filled or sealed with plastics, only natural resins A didgeridoo designed and tuned by an aboriginal craftsman
Jake from USA To me, any tube played genuinely. That could mean anything really, but as long as you put feeling and soul into what you're doing, anything can become a genuine instrument. What is meant by it as far as selling a didgeridoo is a promotion that it is "of aboriginal concept" that it looks and feels like the real deal. Authentic probably means that it is being sold as an instrument primarily, that maybe the product is 'real' but the process of procuring or making the instrument are not what has been done by Native people since its invention as the didgeridoo Meaning that it is in the style that is aboriginal. looks, feels, might even play. doesn't mean it is necessarily harvested or treated by a native artist. Could mean anything from a labeling device to a drone pipe from a native artist. kind of ambiguous
James Balducci from USA A didgeridoo that is hollowed out of eucalyptus bark by termites. One that is made by a skilled didgeridoo crafter. One that is made in the exact way the aborigine people do. One that is made by the aboriginal people of australia.
Jan from United Kingdom Cleaned out by termites Entirely cleaned by humans As the Aborigines would have used As above
Jared from USA A eucalyptus didgeridoo A eucalyptus didge made in Australia A eucalypt didge made in Australia using traditional methods. A eucalypt didge made in Australia by an Aboriginal using traditional methods.
Anonymous from USA Made by the originators Made in the same manner and materials as by the Aboriginals Style as made originally Made by the originators (Aboriginal people)
Anonymous Very good didj Made with the good wood and craft by insect Made with the tradition of aboriginal people Made with the tradition of aboriginal people
Jeff from USA Handmade from natural materials. Genuine Yidaki made by indigenous peoples of Australia in Australia. Authentic yidaki made using traditional methods and artwork. Yidaki made by aboriginal peoples in australia.
Jerome from France Any didgeridoo made by a didj crafter who puts heart in what he's doing, thinking about quality, not only money. It's a didgeridoo who already has a story. In this case it can quite only be an aboriginal didgeridoo/yidaki/mago. It's a didgeridoo aboriginal made, termite-hollowed, painted with clans' colours BY aboriginal people only. Any didgeridoo made by aboriginal people without specific regards concerning quality, sound or price. However it should not be done in an industrial scale.
Jesus from USA Anything I play Didjshop didj Termite made Termite/aboriginal made
Jim from USA I honestly don't know the difference. One that produces the sound most known for the instrument. I honestly don't know the difference. I would only assume that it is one either made by, or used by Aboriginal peoples.
Jim from USA Made in Australia by aboriginal people or under direct supervision of aboriginals Made by aboriginal people using original methods as much as possible Made with non-modern methods and materials Made by aboriginal people
Jim from USA Indigenous-crafted, termite-hollowed woo If the didgeridoo is genuine termite hollowed AND made by an Aboriginal. Made from Eucalyptus trees which have had their interiors hollowed out by termites or died of other causes. Aboriginal didgeridoos are produced in traditionally-oriented communities in Northern Australia or by makers who travel to Central and Northern Australia
Jimmy Mahuron from USA An Aboriginal instrument made from a native tree such as Wooly Butt and Eucalyptus. Made by the Aboriginal people. An Aboriginal instrument made from native trees. An Aboriginal instrument made from native trees. An Aboriginal instrument made from a native tree by the Aboriginal people.
Anonymous A genuine certified didge Same as above Wooden One made by an aborigine
Anonymous Made by a native Made by a native Made by a native Made by a native
Joao from Portugal Wood maiden (eucalyptus) eaten by the australian termites and crafted by someone in order to assure resistance and sound quality One polished inside out made out of a tree and with a certain tone Its a didj made from a wooden tree of eucalyptus that has been eaten from the inside and the aboriginals work them to be more usable for men to play Found and crafted by an aborigine, and the its normally painted with symbols from the different regions or clans
Anonymous from USA Aboriginal made. Aboriginal made. Aboriginal made using traditional methods. Aboriginal made.
Joe from USA Made by aboriginal people but not necessarily using traditional methods Copies of those made by aboriginal people but not made by them. Made by others using traditional methods. Made by aboriginal people using traditional methods
Anonymous A termite hollowed eucalypt tree (bloodwood,...), that has it origin from arnhem land. A termite hollowed eucalypt tree (bloodwood,...), that has it origin from arnhem land. A yidaki, used by Yolgnu for playing by ceremonies. I don't understand the question and difference between questions above and this, please explain:)
Anonymous from United Kingdom A didgeridoo made by, and in the place stated, by the vendor A didgeridoo crafted by an aborigine A didgeridoo made in traditional aboriginal manner A didgeridoo made by an aborigine, in a traditional way and perhaps decorated with aboriginal images
Anonymous Termite hollowed and hand painted, harvested and finished in Australia. Termite hollowed and hand painted, harvested and finished in Australia. Termite hollowed and hand painted, harvested and finished in Australia, painted in the true Aboriginal style. All the above, but with the harvesting, painting and finishing done by Aboriginal people.
John Griffiths from Australia A branch hollowed out by termites As above One using traditional methods with traditional decoration One that has been made by Aborigines from the areas where they were traditionally made.
Anonymous from USA Judging by what I understand, the word "genuine" is referring to any hollowed tube made by a craftsmen that produces the didj drone Haha depends on what website your on A didgeridoo hallowed out by termites used to tell stories A didgeridoo hollowed out by termites and made(finished by an indigenous australian
Anonymous Termite hollowed tree branch Made by Aboriginal people Termite hollowed tree branch made made by Aboriginal people Aboriginal people
John Smith from USA Not a term that I think can be applied to a Didgeridoo. Not a term that I think can be applied to a Didgeridoo. Not a term that I think can be applied to a Didgeridoo. One that is made by Aboriginal people of traditional materials.
Anonymous from Canada One that is hollowed out by termites while the tree is still alive and harvested in the traditional manner. One that is "produced" by Aboriginal didj crafters in sustainable practice. More "gravel-ly" sound. not as "clean" in tone as some of the more modern instruments. More so used in traditional ceremonies. I'm not sure as I don't think I have ever heard this term. I would guess it would be one that is produced in Australia.
Johnny Johnny from USA One of good craftsman ship,could be of different varieties Termite hollowed,comes from its native origins One made for ceremony,maybe particular key for corroboree,certain dimensions One made from yolngu person/yidaki/mago
Jon from USA Made with Australian Eucalyptus Made with Australian Eucalyptus, and made by Aborigines Without any artwork With artwork
Jordan from USA Using the word genuine should describe a didgeridoo that is well made An authentic didgeridoo would be thought to made by an Aboriginal person. An traditional didgeridoo would be thought to be made by an Aboriginal person using the traditional termite method. An Aboriginal didgeridoo should be a didgeridoo that is definitely made by an Aboriginal expert.
Jorge from Peru Its a eucalyptus didgeridoo made by aboriginal people in australia I think its not difference for genuine and authentic. in spanish "autentico y genuino" ar synonyms. I think a didgeridoo made by the traditional way and with traditional designs A didgeridoo made by aboriginal people
Joseph from Netherlands Genuine means minimal made in australia from eucalyptus wood hollowed by termites. Best would be also produced and handled by aboriginals. Claim the exclusivity!! From Australia The whole package, like australia, eucalyptus, termites, aboriginals, painted Australian eucalyptus, hollowed by termites, painted and used by aboriginals. Should be priceless
Josh from USA A 'genuine' didgeridoo would be one that is a Eucalyptus branch that has been hollowed by termites. An 'authentic' didgeridoo would be one made from genuine materials (Eucalyptus), but has been hollowed out my a person rather than termites. A 'traditional' didgeridoo would be one that is made to similar specs as an authentic or genuine, but not made from Eucalyptus An 'Aboriginal' didgeridoo would be one that has been decorated in a traditional aboriginal art style.
Anonymous A didgeridoo hollowed out by termites A didgeridoo crafted from fiberglas or similar synthetic material A didgeridoo with traditional paintings on. A didgeridoo crafted by a aboriginal
Julia from United Kingdom Something that does what it is supposed to do - play sound and is in a familiar shape Made to some kind of set standard - but this standard could be set by an external group that is not 'authentic' shall we say Is decorated or made using past traditional methods - more hand made than mass produced I would hope is an item made by an aboriginal but however may well not be - ie it could just employ the art or style
Justin from USA A one of a kind didgeridoo A "real" didgeridoo A handmade musical instrument/piece of art All of the above. (Genuine, Authentic, Traditional)
Ken Betteley from Australia Termite hollowed A naturally hollowed out piece of wood that hasn't been hand made or machined out A hollow log, traditionally Eucalyptus It is a wind instrument of the Aborigines the oldest in the world I think
Kenny from USA The word didgeridoo is a European name associated with Australian instrument therefore "Genuine" can take a wide variety of meanings. "Authentic" is also a term associated with the flavor. Traditional would describe something associated with a culture, tribe or skin group. Having roots or methods that tie into culture. Aboriginal is a "Local Guy" so if there were instruments like that made in the Americas could be "Aboriginal." Horns made in Mexico are called other names. No disrespect.
Kent from USA Built by an aboriginal who has mastered the art, passed down from generation to generation. Authentic/genuine, its a play with words. mass producing, or made by hand/termites, determines how you would classify a didge a person who comes from an ethnic line, genetic line of aboriginals, who crafts didge's, makes them not only with skill, but with their spirit. See above answer See 2 answers above
Kevin from USA A piece of a hardwood tree naturally hollowed by termites and harvested and crafted by Australia's Aboriginal people. A piece of a tree naturally hollowed by termites and harvested and crafted by Australia's Aboriginal people. A piece of a tree naturally hollowed by termites and harvested and crafted by In the same fashion Australia's Aboriginal people do with low quality. I would say a didj painted by any old Aboriginal person with poor quality
Anonymous from USA Made by an aboriginal Made by an aboriginal Made in the form of an old didgeridoo Made by an aboriginal
Anonymous from USA Clan collected eucalyptus finished by clan members In modern times? If so to me a authentic didgeridoo is clan collected and finished using ancient techniques with modern tools and equipment when able. TRUE Yidaki Any Didgeridoo built in traditional manners of plucking the proper termite hollowed wood and finishing in traditional styles
Kevin Lancaster from USA Made by the Aboriginal people Made by the Aboriginal people Made by the Aboriginal people A wind instrument made by the Aboriginal people
Anonymous from United Kingdom A didj which has been naturally hollowed out by termites and comes from the corret tree. A didj which has been made and tuned by a trained craftsman. Not entirely sure. A didj with certain characteristics.
Anonymous from Sweden Should have the real feeling, touch and sound. Should be made in Australia using an authentic didgeridoo as inspiration. Should be a old handcrafted instrument that is made by aborigines The original ones that is used for inspiration for making. Placed between genuine and Aboriginal. It's a traditional instrument that could be made elsewhere. Actually has the lowest level comparing with the rest in my eyes.
Kim Coulter from USA I never thought about this much. I suppose it means tan instrument made from a native Australian eucalypt, crafted by traditional means, decorated by native people in Australia. I really don't know how this would differ from genuine--an instrument crafted from a eucalypt that grew in Australia, by an Australian craftsman, by traditional means I suppose it might imply that the tools used to craft the instrument were not modern power tools for one thing. These questions are quite thought provoking. I'm not sure the answers from a bloke living in the USA are worth much. I suppose this would imply that the craftsman who made the didgeridoo was aboriginal.
Kirsty from Australia A didgeridoo that can be played as a real instrument (i.e. not ornamental) A didgeridoo that meets certain standards (e.g. termite hollowed) A didgeridoo made according to traditional Aboriginal techniques (e.g. termite hollowed) A didgeridoo made by Aboriginal people
Koen from Netherlands An aboriginal didj from bloodwood / eucalypt An aboriginal didgeridoo with bark left on An aboriginal didj with traditional aboriginal spot-painting on it Any didgeridoo made by an aboriginal family member.
Kris from Australia A hand-crafted termite-hollowed timber didge. A didge that has been hand-crafted from carefully selected termite-hollowed timber grown in a wild place with it's own unique sound and presence. Different depending on the location it is meant to represent. A genuine didge that looks, sounds and is made from the same materials as the didges produced by aboriginal people for their own cultural purposes. You could class all didges as an aboriginal instrument, however I think now it is a traditional didge made by an aboriginal person.
Kris Ulrich from Canada It is made of a tree hollowed out by termites and made by an Aboriginal. It is a word used to make people think it is made by termites and by Aboriginals. They say as long as it can make a sound it is authentic even if no Aboriginal ever touched it. A Eucalyptus tree hollowed out by termites and crafted by an Aboriginal. Made by an Aboriginal and used by one.
Anonymous Any didgeridoo. One hand made made by an Australian Aborigine and out of the their traditional material. One made by hand using the method Aboriginals use. One hand made made by an Australian Aborigine and out of the their traditional material.
Anonymous from Australia Some sort of validity associated with it - as if a governing body has determined it meets a certain set of criteria to be classed as 'authentic' Some sort of validity associated with it - as if a governing body has determined it meets a certain set of criteria to be classed as 'authentic' An older, perhaps less decorated didj. Decorated with aboriginal designs
Anonymous from USA Made from eucalyptus hollowed out by termites. Same as above but made by an Aboriginal. Same as 'authentic' Same as 'authentic'
Anonymous One made by natural processes (termites) One made by Aboriginal artists Plain or with tribe specific artwork One produced by Aboriginal people
Leon from United Kingdom Made in australia out of correct materials As above As above As above
Anonymous from USA An instrument that can be played An instrument that can be played An instrument that can be played An instrument made by an Aboriginal person that can be played
Loe In De Braekt from Netherlands One of Australia Made in Australia Playing the Yolgnu Style Made in Australia
Lr from USA One that works and plays like a didgeridoo One that is made by aboriginal craftsmen One that is made of eucalyptus tree, hollowed by termites One made by aboriginal craftsmen
Luca from Italy Made by aboriginal people The same The same The same
Luke Dickson from Sweden Made by an Aboriginal for the purpose of ceremonial use - Corroborees etc.; used by Aboriginals for purely Aboriginal purposes. Made by an Aboriginal person for a variety of purposes, be they ceremonial, trade etc. A term used to describe authentic processes of making a true didgeridoo (ie, not on the good ol' lathe, but termite mounds etc.) Well, this is just my opinion, but let's just say "made in Indonesia/(insert other non-Aboriginal culture)" can very easily be attached to this expression.
Lynne from United Kingdom Termites have hollowed out the wood Made by aboriginal using authentic wood ie jarrah Showing aboriginal paintings, dream time etc Used originally in ceremonies
Anonymous from Canada One handcrafted by an aboriginal using techniques passed down by his ancestors. One handcrafted by an aboriginal using techniques passed down by his ancestors. One handcrafted by an aboriginal using techniques passed down by his ancestors. One handcrafted by an aboriginal using techniques passed down by his ancestors.
Anonymous from Spain Made like aboriginals make them The same The same The same
Manuel from Italy Termite made Don't know With paint Don't know
Marc Kalmanson from USA A musical/and ceremonial instrument made from the trunk or branch of a eucalyptus tree, or other native hardwood, hollowed out by termites, then skinned of its' bark, shaped, trimmed at the ends and all work done by an Aboriginal person. A musical/and ceremonial instrument made from the trunk or branch of a eucalyptus tree, or other native hardwood, hollowed out by termites, then skinned of its' bark, shaped, trimmed at the ends. One made from eucalyptus tree or other hardwood, cylindrical or conical in shape and from 1 to 3 meters long. A musical/and ceremonial instrument made from the trunk or branch of a eucalyptus tree, or other native hardwood, hollowed out by termites, then skinned of its' bark, shaped, trimmed at the ends and all work done by an Aboriginal person. It may also be decorated with paintings of animals, geometric shapes.
Marcin Zawiazalec from Poland No idea No idea No idea No idea
Margaret from USA I suppose, a working instrument. One made in the traditional fashion A branch hollowed by termites? One worked and finished by aboriginal people
Mario from Austria A genuine didge should be a original aboriginal didge. but I know its mostly not A didge which is made similar to a aboriginal didge A didge which is used in a traditional way maybe for rituals or so. and its passed on for generations A didge which is made by aboriginal people painted with there holy symbols
Mark from USA Not sure. To me it means made by an aboriginal in Australia. To me it indicates one made by hand from raw materials. One made in Australia by Aboriginals.
Mark from United Kingdom I don't know as I can't imagine what a 'non-genuine' didj would be! See above! One made of traditional materials by traditional methods. As above, and crafted by aboriginal people.
Mark Sonzogni from USA All these mean the same thing. I feel I have a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal didge because I got it from a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal artist, not some cheap knock-off All these mean the same thing. I feel I have a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal didge because I got it from a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal artist, not some cheap knock-off All these mean the same thing. I feel I have a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal didge because I got it from a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal artist, not some cheap knock-off All these mean the same thing. I feel I have a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal didge because I got it from a genuine, traditional, authentic Aboriginal artist, not some cheap knock-off
Marlon Fuller from USA When it is singed by the maker and has a number on it. Same as above One that is used every day One made by an aboriginal arts
Marshall from USA Traditional materials, handmade Not sure Not sure Not sure
Martin from USA Not crafted from PVC or other man-made material Likely crafted in Australia with representative Aboriginal artwork Crafted from termite-hollowed eucalyptus Crafted and decorated by an Aboriginal artist with dreamtime story designs using termite-hollowed eucalyptus or other native species
Martin from USA One made by an aborigine from naturally occurring materials. See above One made out of materials used pre white man use techniques of that time period Huh? See above.
Martin Sørensen from Denmark Termite hollowed doesn't need to be with artwork Made by an aboriginal Used for rituals Aboriginal didgeridoo is termite hollowed with aboriginal artwork.
Matt Jamieson from Australia Made in Australia by termites and crafted by an Indigenous person from the north of Australia As above but meeting structural and sound qualities. As per genuine but also reflecting a construction following established practices evolved over thousands of years. As all of above but also has a mystical quality that tells a story of the land, people and animals.
Matthew from USA Not sure One that is made by aborigines An aboriginal didgeridoo A traditional didgeridoo
Anonymous A didgeridoo that has been termite hollowed and made by an aboriginal from eucalyptus wood. A didgeridoo made by a non-aboriginal cutter. A didgeridoo is one played as an accompaniment to cultural and ceremonial dancing. A didgeridoo made by aboriginal people.
Maurice Dickson from Ireland A didge that has been harvested after being hollowed by the termites Same as above I think Don't know A didge that has been harvested after being hollowed by the termites
Max from Peru One made in traditional way, traditional materials. An authentic didge is one that is created in the way that it is told to be created or from the materials that the seller told to. It is defined by the way that it is extracted and worked keeping a traditional way of production. The didges created by aboriginal people, by their ways, termites, etc.
Michael Jones from USA Any didgeridoo that makes a good sound. A didgeridoo made from an Aborigine A didgeridoo made from the same materials the aborigines use. A didgeridoo made from an Aborigine
Michael from USA This could be almost anything This is pretty vague too Made in a traditional aboriginal format This should be made by aboriginals people
Michael Stone from USA Made from the aboriginals. Made by the Aboriginals Same answer Same answer
Michael Taylor from USA They are hollowed-out by termites from northern Australia Ones made by Aboriginal people. One that looks like a didgeridoo that an Aboriginal person would use. A genuine termite hollowed didj from northern Australia that was hand selected, crafted, and embellished by an Aboriginal artist.
Michelle Brough from USA A didj that has been primarily carved out by termites (eucalyptus), with art and minor refinements added by someone with knowledge of the Aboriginal arts and heritage. "Authentic" is a word I've seen so often for fakes, I now take this to mean a didj that has been created by attempting to recreate the work of the termites and the Aboriginal artist. I would say a "traditional" didj is one that is genuine, and where it adheres to... well, traditional Aboriginal designs (art) and modifications Unfortunately, if I saw "Aboriginal" with "didgeridoo", I would think twice about buying... as it's a bit redundant to me, and therefore makes me think the seller is trying too hard to show that it's legit... kind of like "authentic".. Again, I see a "genuine" didj as one harvested and modified by someone with knowledge of the Aboriginal arts and heritage...
Miguel from Spain Termite hollowed and handcrafted by an aboriginal people with their ceremonial Didgeridoo made by an aboriginal artist. Made by the same way of the others, but it can be with other type of wood, like teka, or others. It's an eucalyptus didj with artwork on them
Anonymous A termite hollowed eucalyptus didgeridoo Same Same using traditional methods and tools to make the didgeridoo Same, made by an aborigine
Murray Willett from USA Not counterfeit. Made in Australia, by the real people. Not counterfeit. Made in Australia, by the real people. Made of eucalyptus by termite hollowing One played by Aboriginals
Nathaniel from Australia Made in Australia Made by a Aboriginal Made by a Aboriginal & hollowed by termites Made by a Aboriginal in the traditional way
Neil Gee from USA Genuine means it is real and not copied, not a bastardised form of a true didgeridoo, Authentic should mean 'true to form', ie made from termite hollowed wood by aborigines, but can easily be misconstrued as 'legitimate in design', meaning a long tube that produces sound could be authentic. Made by Aborigines to be used in traditional ceremonies. Made by Aborigines.
Nicholas Pottle from United Kingdom Hollowed out by termites. From australia They have Aboriginal artwork on them? A hollow log
Nick from USA I think any didge is genuine so long as it works Again I think this could mean an didge that works Traditional would mean that it is made of a term. hollowed tree A traditional that has been painted with the aboriginal art work
Nolan from USA A genuine didgeridoo doesn't really mean much to me since that term is thrown around so much. It could just be any didj that works. Authentic is just the same as genuine. A traditional I would assume means that it is a termite hollowed didj with a basic shape to it maybe with traditional aboriginal designs painted on it. This word doesn't have too much authenticity to it either since it is used by a lot of people to describe didgeridoos that aren't what I would expect when I think aboriginal. What it should mean though is that it is made by a Native australian aboriginal from a termite hollowed log.
Omar Khawaja from Pakistan It is an amplifier and modifier to the sound you're making and yelling into the didgeridoo, It has spirituality: a distinct and unique sound emanating from the delicate inside configuration brought about by the termites' taste for good quality hardwood and the knowledgeable effort of a good didgeridoo craftsman, It is a medium for aboriginal artwork, which should reflect the spirit of the didgeridoo and its value as an aboriginal musical instrument. An authentic aboriginal didgeridoo, that is harvested, crafted and decorated by Aborigines. This didgeridoo has a clear voice voice with booming vocals and harmonic brilliance. A didgeridoo to be an authentic Aboriginal didgeridoo only if the didgeridoo is genuine termite hollowed AND made by an Aboriginal.
Omar L. De La Tejera from Mexico A real eucalyptus-insect-eated branch found and re-designed by a aboriginal artist (no need to be painted) A real eucalyptus-insect-eated branch found by a aboriginal didgeridoo maker (no paint at all) A real eucalyptus-insect-eated branch found and re-designed by a aboriginal artist following his tribe rules for didgeridoo making(no need to be painted) A real eucalyptus-insect-eated branch found and re-designed by a aboriginal artist (no need to be painted)
Patrick Bodine from USA Eucalyptus trees that are hollowed out by termites and harvested by Aboriginals skilled in the craft and then either decorated with art or left with bark on it, An authentic Aboriginal didgeridoo is harvested end decorated using Aboriginal images A didgeridoo that is used during Aboriginal ceremonies One that is handed down through the generations, used strictly for ceremonies or special occasions
Anonymous from Germany Made from genuine material (i.e. naturally termite hollowed Eucalyptus tree) Same Made using traditional tools and perhaps carrying traditional artwork. As above but also made by an Aboriginal
Patrick from USA Made with natural materials. Made by indigenous tribe members of Australia. Made by indigenous tribe from Australia using native materials. Made as above in traditional, hand down fashion.
Paul Hepker from USA A didgeridoo made by Aboriginals in the time-honored, traditional manner. See above. Possibly with certification. See 'genuine'... Perhaps not made by Aboriginals. 'Genuine' didj, made by aboriginal, possibly not credited to a specific individual.
Paul Tyres from United Kingdom A woodwind instrument that resonates you vocals A eucalyptus made didgeridoo A termite eaten didgeridoo One that has been crafted by an Aboriginal
Paul Van Heuklom from USA I assume that this means that it was made and decorated by an Aboriginal person, probably from a termite-hollowed eucalyptus branch. Authentic and genuine strike me as interchangeable terms. We might say, though, that a didgeridoo has been authenticated by a signature or piece of paper of some kind. Tradition might imply that it has been made according to the history and guidelines of Aboriginal people, but if made by a non-Aboriginal person we might call it traditional-style. Difficult question... I guess it might be a didge made for and used only for Aboriginal ceremony and enjoyment--not for commercial sale or the entertainment of tourists.
Peter Heidrich from Australia Made by aboriginal people as if it was made for themselves With the same characteristics as hundreds of years ago Made with care, following the traditional rules, the correct materials and techniques. Made by aboriginal people as it was made for aboriginal people
Peter from South Africa This carries no meaning to me This carries no meaning to me A didgeridoo made by the traditional methods and traditional materials A traditional didgeridoo made by an Aboriginal artist
Peter from Sweden Made from eucalypt wood from Australia. Made of an aborigine. Made in a traditional way from eucalypt wood of an aborigine. Made of an aborigine with signs of the aboriginal culture.
Peter from Belgium Ik ken het woord genuine niet Een didgeridoo gemaakt door aboriginals Uitgehold door temieten Een didgeridoo gemaakt door aboriginals
Philip Hamilton from USA To me a genuine didgeridoo is from Australia and made by an Aboriginal. An authentic didgeridoo has to be made by the Aborigines and not just for tourists. Traditional didgeridoos have to sound Arboreal with all the usual range of tones. 100% Aboriginal has to be make by the Aborigines complete with Arboreal art painted or burnt onto it.
Anonymous from Germany Didgeridoo that is hollowed out by termites? Didgeridoo made by an Aboriginal person? Yidaki from Arnhemland? Didgeridoo hollowed out by termites & painted by an Aboriginal person?
Anonymous from France A didj for decoration, not really for play because of low musical quality. A didj made by aboriginal people A didj made by termites A didj made by termites and aboriginal people
Piergiorgio from Italy Eucalypt eaten by termites Made in australia by aboriginal people For traditional uses..as religious Aboriginal..
Ralph from USA Made by hand by a native Made by hand by a native Made by a native or by someone trained by a native in the old style and of materials they used to use Made by hand by a native
Randy from USA One that is made in Australia One that is made in Australia One that is made by aboriginal hands One that is made by the hands of the original inhabitants of Australia
Randy from USA I am always highly suspicious of marketing terms such as these. I feel they are designed to deceive while being defensible under the law. "Aboriginal Made" (or crafted, built...etc) says it better. I am always highly suspicious of marketing terms such as these. I feel they are designed to deceive while being defensible under the law. "Aboriginal Made" (or crafted, built...etc) says it better. I am always highly suspicious of marketing terms such as these. I feel they are designed to deceive while being defensible under the law. "Aboriginal Made" (or crafted, built...etc) says it better. I think this comes closest to telling me that a didgeridoo was made by one of Australia's Indigenous Peoples.
Raul from USA The original. Not a duplicated version. How they were made thousands of years ago. Made by the Aboriginal people. Have artwork by these people.
Ravyn Nimchuk from USA Made in a traditional way using traditional tools and methodology. One that is made and is agreed by a majority of people who inspect it and feel that it is made with a quality that mass reproduction can not compare to both esthetically and musically. One that is made while observing and practicing the old rituals and tool using of their ancestors. One that is created by an individual by whom the Aboriginal community has observed, inspected, approved and given their blessing to the individual's method of production or who has followed traditional ways of making the instruments.
Anonymous Termite hollowed This could mean Looks like a genuine didge But could be made by other means. Decorated with aboriginal style art.
Anonymous from Netherlands From a tree of australia Made by aboriginals A didgeridoo same as made hundred years before Made by aboriginal
Rev. Chris Addotta from USA 'genuine' is a misleading word that most people take to mean 'certified'. When one claims that the product is genuine, though, all it has to be to fulfil that word is real! It is hard for any item sold to not be real. If you can touch it, it's real, and therefore genuine! This should mean made by an authority on the subject. As there are probably no regulating bodies granting mastership in didj making, this is another word that is likely to be misused. I would hope that this would indicate that the maker of this didj did research into the old ways of making the instruments and uses those techniques to make new ones. I would also expect it to be made of 'traditional' materials. No PVC or fiberglas in 'traditional' See above for 'traditional' and add that the maker is of Aboriginal ancestry. The maker of this instrument should be in the life and culture of his/her people everyday. It is important that the Aboriginal people not only get the credit and profit for these products, but that they also can regulate how many of their instruments are going where. I would even go so far as to say that I would want the makers to interview the prospective buyers and choose the ones that are going to respect the instrument, Aboriginal culture as a whole, and the Aboriginal people as individuals.
Ric from Canada A didge made from a termite hollowed tree limb A didge made by an Australian aboriginal from a termite hollowed tree limb A termite hollowed tree limb made and decorated by an Australian Aboriginal A termite hollowed tree limb didge made, decorated and played by an Australian aboriginal
Anonymous One from australia made by aboriginal people One from australia made by aboriginal people One a aboriginal family would have Made by aboriginal people
Anonymous Australian, insect hollowed, Aboriginal Australian, Aboriginal Basic, native Made by Aboriginals in traditional way
Richard from USA Eucalyptus limb hollowed out by ants. Made in the traditional style of any type of wood. A didge made the correct way by the correct people. A generic term given to any didge
Rick from Australia Produced by local craftsmen in traditional way ???? don't like the term authentic!! Hollow log cleaned up and decorated (or not decorated depending on local custom!) Hollow log
Rick Stanley from Australia Made in Australia by indigenous Australians of Australian hard woods NT indigenous Australian made Made for cultural purpose in the manner they have been made for thousands of years. All of the above
Rob from USA Wood that was hollowed out by real termites instead of drilled. Wood that was hollowed out by real termites instead of drilled. Wood that was hollowed out by real termites instead of drilled. Wood that was hollowed out by real termites instead of drilled, and made by an Aboriginal artist.
Rodrigo from Portugal A genuine didgeridoo is one made by aboriginal people. An authentic didgeridoo is one that is a real music instrument. A traditional didgeridoo is one that keeps the shape and sound from previously made ones, An aboriginal didgeridoo is one made by aboriginal people, as a genuine one.
Ron from Canada Harvested in Australia, crafted by aboriginal people, and those people benefit from the sale of the item. I think it is the same as "genuine". A Didj harvested and crafted the way it has been done throughout the history of the aboriginal people who discovered it. To me, that is the same as 'traditional'.
Ron from USA One that is made by the aboriginals. Same as above Same as above One made by an aboriginal from Australia.
Ron from USA One made in the original tradition and materials. One made by the lineage of the original makers. Similar to genuine. One made by the original lineage - similar to authentic.
Anonymous Eucalypt tree termite hollowed didge made by mother earth Man made but with authentic art decor Man made with no art (bare) A combination of all three made by earth but decor of authentic art
Ruben from Italy Made with real eucalypt I don't know what it means Is made with traditional shape and size A didj made by aboriginal artists
Rushe from USA A wooden, termite-created branch completed by an Aboriginal person. I would think all of these would be the same in my opinion. I would think all of these would be the same in my opinion. I would think all of these would be the same in my opinion.
Anonymous Real, in the sense that it was created with pure intention and technique. This is another broad term, but I would consider it to be synonymous with "traditional" or "aboriginal," but also holding the integrity of how didgeridoos were originally crafted, if it was not made by an Aborigine. A didgeridoo crafted using Aboriginal, traditional techniques A didgeridoo crafted by the Aborigines themselves.
Ryan from Canada A hollow piece of wood made airtight for beautiful music One from Australia One from home land Made by aboriginals
Sally Ann Bryant from USA Created by the true Aboriginal people of Australia. Could be a copy Could be a copy Could be a copy
Anonymous from Spain Talking about didgeridoos Genuine sounds to me the same as authentic or traditional, or even aboriginal. Maybe because I am form spain and my mother language is not english. For me the key is not the word that describe the didgeridoo, but to know the didgeridoo is made by the aboriginal people. To know that with my purchase, I am not facilitating any exploitation. So the value of the didgeridoo also comes from getting to know who made it and in what conditions. The traditional word sounds to me more related to the way the artisans do their job. A didgeridoo made by the aboriginal people.
Anonymous A real didgeridoo that you can play. A didgeridoo made in Australia. A didgeridoo made traditionally with no art or enhancement. A didgeridoo handmade by the aborigines.
Anonymous from USA Not a counterfeit Real Characteristic of the older style It is a wind instrument made of wood
Anonymous One crafted by natives One from Australia One made of native wood One crafted by natives
Scott from Canada Any didj that can be played. A didj that carries a certificate authenticating that it was produced by an Australian Aboriginal person from Australian sourced materials. Composed of wood and termite hollowed. A didj produced by an Aboriginal artisan.
Sergio from Italy Only if the didgeridoo is genuine termite hollowed AND made by an Aboriginal The word authentic is used in the sale of a lot of didgeridoos, most of which are far from authentic. With permission from the traditional owners Australian Aborigines consider a didgeridoo to be an authentic Aboriginal didgeridoo only if the didgeridoo is genuine termite hollowed AND made by an Aboriginal
Sergio from Colombia Made of eucalyptus Made in australia out of eucalyptus Made in the old-fashioned way Made by aboriginal people.. not supposed to sale
Anonymous Either made by an aboriginal tribe or with the permission of a tribe, made from australian timber and hollowed by white ants As above Would have to be made by an aboriginal As above
Anonymous from USA A real one made by natives One made to look and seem like a real one One made to like like a real one A musical making device used by the natives
Sharon Pick from Australia Um..genuine..the real thing, truthfully made by an indigenous person Made of materials and decorated symbolically to reflect its indigenous kinship and place/land/ country/home of origin One used ceremoniously perhaps, where the maker puts their personnel spirit/ energies into its making/shaping and decorating A didge made by an Indigenous person, made hollowed wood the sound of which can bring healing, joy, smiles, spirituality and rhythm to even the most rigid!
Shawn from USA Termite hallowed and finished by Aboriginal people. Termite hallowed and finished by Aboriginal people. Termite hallowed and finished by Aboriginal people. Termite hallowed eucalyptus wood.
Simon from United Kingdom Sales terms are essentially meaningless. Genuine = real. Sales terms are essentially meaningless. authentic implies Authority. Sales terms are essentially meaningless. Traditional implies a handed down design. Sales terms are essentially meaningless. 'Aboriginal' can imply any (or none) of the above.
Spencer from New Zealand Are instruments made by indigenous Australian Aborigine who has the instrument as part of their cultural heritage Are instruments which are supplied with Certificates of Authenticity Are instruments made by indigenous Australian Aborigine from selected trees naturally hollowed out by termites Vintage instruments used in ceremony and Aboriginal communities
Stacey Mcgaughey from New Zealand A didgeridoo 'harvested' by a member of an aboriginal nation, crafted in an authentic manner using traditional aboriginal methods. As above As above As above
Anonymous It's a didgeridoo hollowed by termite and cut by an aboriginal people. It's a didgeridoo hollowed by termites It is a didgeridoo which is prepared exactly for a ritual or other. It's a didgeridoo made by an aboriginal people.
Anonymous from Austria Made of Eucalyptus. Good question! Personally I link this term to Yidaki or Mago. A didge made by Aborigines?
Stefan from Germany From australia, made of eucalypt a.s.f. (see below) Made from eucalypt tree, low amount of handicraft or mechanical work "crafted" by termites, low amount of handicraft or mechanical work Handled & crafted mainly by aboriginal people
Anonymous It would be made in Australia by aborigines Something that at least approximates a didgeridoo made in Australia by aborigines One made using techniques used by Australian Aborigines One made by an Aborigine
Anonymous Made from termite hollowed out eucalyptus Termite hollowed out didgeridoo from australia Made in a traditional for or style. Made by an aboriginal
Anonymous Made in Australia using Eucalyptus by Aborigines. Made in Australia using Eucalyptus by Aborigines. Made in Australia using Eucalyptus by Aborigines. Made in Australia using Eucalyptus by Aborigines.
Anonymous Made from Australian wood... by Australian craftsmen or in the style of Australian craftsmen Any didgeridoo Any didgeridoo Made by Aboriginal craftsmen
Stew from USA Termite hollowed eucalyptus tree, cut, shaped and finished by Aboriginal peoples. Made by Aboriginal Peoples. Didgeridoo made by Aboriginal Peoples for Tribal and Ceremonial use. ?? I have no idea
Susan from USA Genuine doesn't mean much to me. It makes it sound like there is a brand name for didgeridoos or that sometimes they come with batteries.... Not too sure what this would mean-once again makes it sound like there is a set form for didgeridoos. This maybe has more meaning -would assume that there are no new fangled things added-no plastic. Made the way that they have been for many years in the style of the aboriginal people. Would mean, to me, that they were made by Aboriginal people-would assume in a traditional style.
Tamás Papp from Hungary I think, the genuine didgeridoos are made at the past, by the aboriginals, before this instrument strat to be famous, and trendy. I think these are made before 1960's, or much older. I think, this is a didgeridoo, which is made by a professional aboriginal master, from a termite hollowed eucalyptus trunk. I think, it is a didgeridoo, which is made by a not aboriginal master, from a termite hollowed tree trunk. I think, it is the same with the authentic didgeridoo
Taylor from USA 'genuine' means that the didgeridoo could be a fake and made by different people of different places 'authentic' means that the special kind of wood that they use to make didgeridoos are genuine termite hollowed. which is hollowed out my termites naturally. Traditional is the kind that aboriginal people still play today the same way they did centuries ago An 'aboriginal' didgeridoo may have authentic aboriginal artwork on the did
Tero from Finland That sounds like false advertising to me - a didgeridoo is a didgeridoo, and it is no less "genuine" whether it is modern piece of equipment made from PVC pipe or a tree branch eaten away by termites. See above Here's a different story altogether - "traditional" refers to something that has been going on for years and has been passed down from generation to generation. Therefore, a traditional didgeridoo should be a didgeridoo made traditionally: it should be a eucalyptus branch hollowed out by termites that is prepared as an instrument the traditional way - for example painted with certain pigments or techniques, and most importantly, according to certain rules. See "traditional" above. When adding "aboriginal" to the sales pitch, the didgeridoo should have been made by an aboriginal artist.
Terry from USA Made exactly like an original Made exactly like an original from a native Made like the early didgeridoos were made Made by Aboriginal people
Anonymous A genuine didgeridoo is made out of hollowed out wood opposed to PVC or other synthetics. Authentic didgeridoos are made eucalyptus wood. A traditional didgeridoo is made out of termite bored wood. Aboriginal didgeridoos are made by aboriginal people in Australia.
Anonymous A worthless adjective to put describe anything that is a basic didgeridoo. Pretty much a worthless term used to describe any didgeridoo A traditional didgeridoo is one made using the techniques and materials traditionally used by the Aboriginal people. An Aboriginal didgeridoo is on crafted by the Aboriginal people
Thomas Garcia from USA It is a didgeridoo. Means that it was made by an aboriginal Means that it is a termite hollowed branch of eucalypt. A redundant name.
Thomas from USA It exists in real life It exists in real life Wood hollowed out by termites I would believe that to be made by aboriginal people
Tiago from Portugal To me genuine is pure, crafted with natural and original materials and tools (termites included). I suppose the person who crafts it doesn't really matter as long as they keep it genuine. Not copied or forged. I guess all genuine didges are authentic as you can't craft 2 identical didgeridoos. Traditional didgeridoo is made the way the Aborigines do, as to their traditions and culture. An Aboriginal didgeridoo is a genuine didgeridoo, traditionally crafted by an Aboriginal and played by Aboriginals.
Tiago from Portugal I don't like this expression very much. For me, a Didgeridoo is anything that can be played as such. Another expression I don't like. I would forgive someone who used it to refer to termite-hollowed Australian-made instruments, though. One made by an Aboriginal person according to their accepted tradition. Of course this changes a lot by region, so it would make sense to use the words 'Yidaki', 'Mago', etc to refer to specific instruments, and 'traditional didgeridoos' to refer to all such instruments, in general. A didgeridoo made by an Aboriginal person, preferably using tools and materials available to the 'average' Aboriginal person (i. e. not drilled, no Siberian wood, etc). However, this is a misleading term, because many Aboriginal people are (unfortunately) no longer connected to their original culture.
Tim from Australia An instrument that vibrates and creates a sound A didge made by an aboriginal A didge hollowed by termites As above
Tim from United Kingdom This phrase means nothing unless qualified, i.e. genuine Australian Eucalyptus Didgeridoo would be one made from Australian termite-hollowed eucalyptus. As above, the term might be authentic aboriginal didgeridoo/yidaki etc., or authentic australian didgeridoo, meaning it is made by aboriginal groups or from eucalyptus etc. As above; traditional should refer to a didgeridoo that is made as per traditional tribal practices by a local group, in the way that such a group would use such an instrument non-commercially, i.e. consistent with the manufacturing and decorative techniques of a particular ethnicity. As above, Aboriginal should refer to a native usage of the instrument. Aboriginally-made could refer to an instrument made to more contemporary specifications, by an aboriginal maker.
Tim from USA Usually refers to Australian-made, but the term is used in many ways to describe knock-offs as well...ambiguous term really Supposed to refer to one that is made in an indigenous community, although the term is often misused for marketing purposes Often used to describe a vintage instrument with the traditional markings representing the various local totems Another marketing term to describe the instrument, implying that it comes from an indigenous community, often a term used to misrepresent the instrument
Tina from Australia There surely is only one type of genuine, authentic, traditional or Aboriginal didgeridoo? One made from a termite hollowed branch by Aboriginals! As above See above Again, as above
Anonymous A genuine didge is one that has been harvested off a living tree which has been termite hollowed and shaped into a playing instrument All of the above but done by an Aboriginal in the traditional ways from harvesting to painting and everything comes from Australia. Usually stringy bark as well, but bloodwood or woolybutt All of the above I think. All of the above.
Tom from United Kingdom Hmmm tricky, I would say genuine could mean merely a didgeridoo A termite hollowed didge. As authentic but maybe decorated. An 'authentic traditional' didgeridoo - I would hope they are all selected in a way that supports the Aboriginal culture.
Tom from USA I would think that that would mean that the Didge in question was made from termite hollowed wood. This would indicate to me that it was made by an Aboriginal artisan. I would think this refers to a style specific to one of the tribes. A didge found and crafted by an Aboriginal person.
Tomasz Jarmolkiewicz from Poland When it's termite-hollowed. When it's termite-hollowed and made by an Aboriginal. A didgeridoo made form a hollow log. It's an authentic didgeridoo made by an Aboriginal craftsman.
Tommi from Finland As I former said, a real thing, a connection to Australian Outback mysticism can only come from Australia! That can reach the real spirit. Made by the manners of Aborigine arts. The shape, the art, the form and the deep sound.
Tonia Pinheiro from USA To me, genuine means the wood is naturally hollowed out by termites. To me, authentic means the didge is made by an Aboriginal artist To me, traditional means the wood is selected for its particular shape To me, Aboriginal means that an Aboriginal artist made the didj and Aboriginals play this didj.
Tony from USA This can be a rather vague term. I guess you could call a pvc pipe a genuine didge. This one to me is also a bit vague... Traditional is getting closer but I think all three of these first terms need to a little more explanation to be of much use. I take this to be an instrument harvested by the Aboriginal people of Australia themselves and that any profit generated from the sale of it would go back to those people.
Travis from USA A "genuine" didgeridoo is just an didgeridoo. "genuine" is thrown on the front to get people to buy it over another. "authentic" means it is made from the correct type of wood but is not necessarily crafted the same way the Aboriginals crafted them. "traditional" means that it is using the correct wood and is crafted the same way Aboriginals crafted them "Aboriginal" means that it was crafted by an Aboriginal.
Tyson from Australia A didgeridoo made in the traditional aboriginal way with traditional materials and artwork native to that clan or moiety. A didgeridoo made in the traditional aboriginal way with traditional materials and artwork native to that clan or moiety. A didgeridoo made in the traditional aboriginal way with traditional materials and artwork native to that clan or moiety. Of course with so many clans making them now there is no "traditional Didgeridoo" anymore what's traditional for one group is not traditional for another. Unfortunately many people are forgetting their culture and trying to cater for the influx of tourists, thus many of the didges we see today are not truly traditional. A didgeridoo made in the traditional aboriginal way with traditional materials and artwork native to that clan or moiety.
Vince from USA Any working didgeridoo. Same as above One that is made using traditional techniques. One made by aboriginals using traditional techniques.
Anonymous That's easy; Australian made instrument with the same wood and materials as the Aboriginal clans originally used. My thought is that all the native aboriginal clans must agree to the use and export of each piece of art/craft. Aboriginal labor. Same as the Genuine description above made in Australia with original materials but not necessarily manufactured with native Aboriginal hands or supervision. This could even mean loosely that the wonderful work of art was not hand-made in Australia at all but copied by someone and manufactured and sold outside of Australia. A didgeridoo carved out and made lovingly by hand by an indigenous clan member. Each piece May contain a symbol held hallow by each separate clan
William from USA Eucalyptus (or other wood) tube made hollow by termites and shaped by Aboriginal craftsperson One made in Australia by Aboriginal artists, craftsperson One first "discovered" and used by the early Aboriginal cultures One made from wood by Aboriginal people
William from USA Mostly forgery or cheap copies The real deal about 10-20 percent of all didges sold as genuine Made from termite hollowed eucalypt or gum Made by indigenous Aborigines
Anonymous from USA Simply a wind instrument with 2 openings - air in, air out. Could be made out of anything and come from anywhere. There is proof in some way that it is genuine. A didge made from eucalyptus and hollowed by termites. The above but made by one of the indigenous people of Australia.
Zach from USA Made by aborigine, Made by aborigine, Made by aborigine, Made by aborigine,

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