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Did you know that almost all didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold without clearly stating this fact?

Did you know that many didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold using Aboriginal cultural images or are even sold by deceiving the customer into believing they were made by Aboriginal people?

On this page you can read the answers our visitors gave to this question as part of our yearly visitor surveys, where you can win great prizes.
(we post comments only if permission was given)

Over the years we have asked our visitors many different questions and any of the below topics contain hundreds of comments from people all over the world. Enjoy reading what other people have to say on those subjects:-). If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Name and Country

Did you know ... sold without stating that fact?

Did you know ... sold by deceiving customers?

What do you think or feel about these issue that almost all didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold without clearly stating this fact?
What do you think or feel about these issue that many didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold using Aboriginal cultural images or are even sold by deceiving the customer into believing they were made by Aboriginal people?

Anonymous

Yes

No

Again exploiting the Aboriginal culture counting on people's ignorance without having the courage to face the responsibility of "representing" this old culture.

Anonymous

No

No

As above & when I purchased mine in sydney in january none of these facts were told to me. if I had known this I would have tried to buy an aboriginal made didj.

Alan from USA

No

No

It's plainly unethical and should be resisted.

Allen from USA

No

No

Same as above. Plus can you add some gratitude that the culture of aboriginals is (one way or another) changing the world? Waking it up? Its in the plan of humanity. All people have suffered throughout history. All souls. Don't be a victim to a particular culture. Embrace your own god self. Don't get me wrong. I care about aboriginal people thru out the world. I care about humanity. I just know that humanity is running out of time to be separate cultures worrying about who did what to whom. The world has a global environmental crisis to be healed by awakening consciousness and caring. Only one way that can happen. People coming together. The world is humanity's reflection. Global warming reflects our disrespect for her. Our separation is evident. It is time to come together in heart and spirit. I think you can work to make life better for Australia natives without bitterness and blaming. All of humanity has the "inner" life purpose of waking up. Each of us has an "outer" life purpose of making our way in this physical world. Make change from a place of love and acceptance. It is the only true "conscious" way to be a co-creator of all creation. The dream and dreamer in one. Oh and the following questions below........I say no to them because I don't do "shoulds." There is no such universal rule called "should." What would be nice if people were conscious and aware of other peoples needs and feelings is to acknowledge the source of such wonderful gifts to the world. It would be nice to support each other and make our lives better for all. It would be nice that others would not profit and someone else's expense. But really take a look at the way the entire world operates as it is in its "unconscious" and insane state. So what is different for the aboriginal peoples of Australia than anyone else who can scream victim? Nothing. Different story line but same pain. We all need to heal our insanity. All people of the planet. Wake up an smell the oneness. hehehe.:-)

Amekia from Australia

Yes

No

As above

Andres from Spain

Yes

No

I don't like

Andy from Australia

No

No

I think its disgusting and the general public need to be made aware of this.

Angela Hatton from United Kingdom

No

No

Disappointed

Annette from Germany

No

No

That is not right towards the Aborigines. The buyers thinks he or she supports the Aborigines when buying a didj. So it is also not correct towards the customer.

Anonymous

Yes

No

It is a shame

Aslan from USA

Yes

No

Well aside from the fact that it could be seen as misleading if not lying it also seems a bit insulting.

Barry from Netherlands

No

No

For this I feel sorry for the Aboriginal culture. For me culture and traditions are the most important and I respect each culture and tradition. Its a shame that there are people in the "cultivated" world believe that people whit a different culture must be cultivated in to in to our "civilized" culture world wide. These people should go to these cultures and try to learn from their traditions and culture and try to understand how these people live and start to respect this. In our company are 40.000 employees all over the world this means loads of different cultures and traditions and all these people are trained in a so called "Diversity training" to better understand as I feel the world. As you maybe can see I put my feelings in to this question because all people on this globe are the same unless colour religion ore culture.

Bart from Belgium

Yes

No

There are loads of people who smell money..unfortunately we can't do something about this:-(

Bernhard from Switzerland

Yes

No

The aboriginals are ripped of again

Anonymous

No

No

They should not be allowed to continue on doing these untruthful deals people have the right to know if they are genuine or not.

Brett from USA

No

No

Karma will come back to bite the ones who are just looking for a quick buck in the butt

Anonymous from Belgium

Yes

No

See previous answer.. mentioned already there.

Brian from USA

Yes

No

Just don't lie

Bruce Fyfe from United Kingdom

No

No

This is different the cultural imagery belongs to he aboriginal people and they should receive an element of he proceeds gained in their name.

Bryan from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Disgusted I have to put most of the blame on the Australian Government

Carlos Cabrera from Sweden

Yes

No

Europe has made a huge effort to state what are original products like articraft food or wine. I hope Australia can do this as well. I have nothing against other kind of Didjes in the market but I prefer to buy aboriginal Didjes and I need the information to be true.

Carlos from USA

Yes

No

Look in the mirror what do you see? How long can you bear to gaze before that image is distorted and you see the truth?

Anonymous

No

No

This needs to be clearly stated to the customer before purchase; it's sad to think that Aboriginal people are being taken advantage of in this manner.

Anonymous

No

No

I think its bad

Cesar Mayoral Figueroa from Mexico

Yes

No

UNFORTUNATELY WE LIVE IN A QUIET INMORAL WORLD.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I feel this is wrong!

Chris Bailey from New Zealand

Yes

No

Cultural art I think should be able to be used but using the art of the aboriginal people to deceive buyers into thinking it is authentic is ludicrous..

Anonymous

No

No

That sucks.

Anonymous

No

No

I don't have any problem with people making reproductions but they should not be advertised as the "real" thing.

Chris from USA

Yes

No

This is wrong also.

Christopher Weber from USA

Yes

No

It makes everyone look bad

Clint Holmes from USA

Yes

No

Aboriginal didgeridoo makers and their culture are plagued by the same type of fakes as every other culture is.

Cyndi from Australia

Yes

No

It's fraud and people doing this should be charged.

Anonymous

No

No

Sad

Anonymous from Canada

No

No

Not right

Daniela from Germany

Yes

No

I think this is disrespectful behaviour towards Aboriginal culture and people.

Davey from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Again I feel it is disrespectful to the aboriginal people who hold the ideals of the Yirdaki so close

David from Canada

Yes

No

I think it is even more unethical than false presentation

David from USA

No

No

These are disturbing issues and the Aboriginal people should be respected and honored for their great contribution not exploited.

Anonymous

Yes

No

All garbage. I mean I do believe fully what you're saying and I disapprove.

Anonymous from Spain

No

No

The globalization only is the repetition of the same history... we destroy all that we not understand...

Edi from USA

No

No

Sucks

Eduardo from United Kingdom

Yes

No

It is definitely not a good thing. The problem of the didgeridoo is that "anybody can make them" and there is also a great lack of information to the general public: from the materials used to the role of the Didgeridoo in Australian culture. There are "Fair Trade" stickers to certain products which are regulated; it would be ideal to do the same with the Aboriginal didgeridoos but being realistic it is like trying to do the same with the Spanish classical guitars or Stradivarius violins... I think only iPod can afford to have the Authenticity Sticker to all their products... Basically the didgeridoos made by other people could be bad or as good as those made by Aboriginal people. They might have learnt techniques and procedures from Aboriginal people themselves... It is difficult to generalise in this topic.

Elias from Sweden

No

No

Same way as above. It's not right to steal their culture just to make a profit off of people who might have a genuine interest in it.

Els from USA

Yes

No

Like I said above. It is disgusting. People need to be educated to this level of awareness. Probably some people never thought of it. It is the same as stealing music black market movies stealing a name or an image.

Enoch from USA

No

No

I believe that those seeking authentic artwork and instruments need a reliable source that is honest. Giving back to the Australian aboriginal artists is a very moral and worthwhile gesture.

Eric Holman from New Zealand

No

No

That's deceptive marketing. It should be clearly stated that the instrument was not made by the indigenous people of Australia.

Gerhard Seidel from Germany

Yes

No

See above

Glen from Australia

Yes

No

Something that has and is part of someone's culture and has been for longer than we know should not be imitated. the didgeridoo is culture history storytelling and healing not an ornament to look at and not understand.

Greg Goubs from France

No

No

I'm very disappointed. I didn't knew that. According to me the real sound of didgeridoo can be done only by the real Aboriginal people.

Gustavo from Portugal

Yes

No

I feel bad because I've been there I bought one 50 didge who honestly isn't worth 5 the dude who sold it to me told me that it was made by aboriginal people. Lies! So I can unfortunately in first hand that such attitude by the shop-owners makes didgeridoos have a "bad" name(per say) and may lead people to lose their interest in a culture and in an instrument who are much older then the money concept!

Harry from Australia

No

No

II don't think this is fair as thy invented the didgeridoo it is their culture and thy should use it

Hawk from USA

Yes

No

Exploitation is pervasive in our world. Many folks in this country have seen the interest in native flutes rise many fold in the past ten or so years. There are many who make native style flutes but lead the consumer to believe they are made by native people. I can not judge who should or should not use the gifts that Creator offers but I do know that deceit contributes to the ills of the World. If we engage the Gift in a Honorable manner then it grows so that all may benefit...

Heidi from USA

No

No

It's a lot like the Native Americans. Not fair.

Holly from USA

No

No

Beyond being deceitful I feel it is irresponsible inappropriate unkind unfair and shameful. How can people do such things in good conscience?

Ian from USA

No

No

Not good

Ian Robert from Italy

Yes

No

I feel forced to accept this

Illimar Altosaar from Estonia

No

No

Ownership empowerment and Freedom To Operate issues are also important to the aboriginal peoples of Estonia in northeast Europe because we have been subjugated by foreign oppressors fro more than 800 years the years 1215 A.D. onwards. Estonians suffer to this day with this legacy of tyranny and terror Soviet terror continues with Putin's threatening politics.

Isaac Firesmith from USA

Yes

No

It all come back to the exploitation of a native people's and I believe it should be stopped.

Jack from USA

Yes

No

People should not take another culture and pass it off as their own. They are not only doing that they are also trying to make money off what they are doing. If it is not made by aboriginal people then it should state that. People that sell didgeridoos that claim to made by aborigines but aren't are not only taking away business from the aboriginal people but also the customer that bought the didgeridoo. They could get a bad didgeridoo and think it was authentic. The people who do that don't see the as a spiritual instrument that needs respect. They just see it as money. It seems like everything today is driven towards money but is should be toward happiness.

Anonymous

No

No

There should be laws to control this. It's accounting to fraud. If I pretended to be someone I wasn't that would constitute fraud.

Jan from Belgium

Yes

No

Very good

Jan from Netherlands

Yes

No

They have the copyright it has to be by law

Anonymous

No

No

I don't like that

Jarret from USA

No

No

This is wrong. In order to sell something one should receive all the information.

Jeannette from USA

No

No

The consumer is deceived.

Jeff from USA

No

No

I certainly don't agree with deception and lies.

Jeff from USA

No

No

As above

Anonymous

No

No

It is good to be informed...lack of information= lack of knowledge= lack of care= lack of action.

Jesse from USA

No

No

Takes away from the joy of owning something containing an awesome heritage and history

Jim Arrington from USA

Yes

No

Like German or California wines they should be clearly labeled so that the consumer knows what they are getting. Without full information it is fraud and attempting to sell a product as quality-made without having that quality.

Anonymous

No

No

Unfortunately to many people deceive for the sake of money. It's wicked and they will have to pay for this someday

Jocelyn from France

No

No

I'm not so much surprise people always try to make more money... our society's big problem...

Anonymous from Australia

No

No

It's just wrong to do this to people

Jody from USA

No

No

Artwork NOT MADE by Aboriginal Peoples should be CLEARLY MARKED-inspired by... or in the style of...

Joe from USA

No

No

I don't think deceiving people is nice or necessary but the instrument itself show may give that off

Joel from USA

No

No

Country of origin method of making and other pertinent manufacturing information should be revealed. I don't have a problem with Aboriginal cultural images being used by non-Aboriginal makes but this fact should be revealed; claiming they are Aboriginal made when they are not is a crime and the sellers should be prosecuted.

John Norris from Canada

Yes

No

Again buyer beware. A lot of research into the making and distribution of didgeridoos by buyers would prevent mistakes.

Anonymous

No

No

Unfair

Jorge Cereceda from Peru

No

No

It's bad. The people who are doing that are stealing to the aboriginal people and the customers. We made didgeridoos of bamboo and agave we always tell the people about the history of the aboriginal didgeridoos and mark the differences between those and the ones we make.

Anonymous

No

No

Correction or even regulations should be made as needed in a case by case basis as to safeguard the integrity of the cultural value and art of the instrument.

José from Peru

Yes

No

I have been given this reliable web page to get to know more about you and I really think you all are doing a good job in trying to preserve these people's tradition alive. They should not deceive us into making us believe they were made by Aboriginal people.

Josh Greene from USA

Yes

No

I just feel that the Aboriginal people aren't getting the credit/respect that they deserve.

Juan Diego from Costa Rica

Yes

No

I think there should be more cultural control from many entities of the state has to be associations to preserve the cultural facts and not only in Australia but also around the world people has to conform society's to preserve the cultural heritage of this magic instrument its a big shame how far is Costa Rica from Australia and being thinking how to help...

Juan Krespo Diaz from Spain

Yes

No

I think that all of us can make & paint didgeridoos but never using the name of the aboriginals because like this people steel the essence & the spirit of them to get money lying other people.

Justin from USA

No

No

Again another capitalistic manoeuvre. Businesses may exclude the original artists for production and profit margin reasons but they know its these artists they are taking from that make the art desirable so they are willing to put up a front making their mass produced knock offs seem authentic. The fact that this is done at the expense of the artists livelihood the products and the business' integrity and the consumers knowledge of what they are buying makes no difference as long as the bottom line is in the favor of the business.

Kelly from Australia

Yes

No

I believe that it makes the product not as unique and makes didgeridoos lose some of their specialness.

Kerrie from USA

Yes

No

Again I do not have a problem with it unless it offends the people themselves. If they don't want their images being used then their wishes should be respected but if they don't mind then I think it's a fine way to pay homage to the history of the instrument.

Lambert H Dilling from Netherlands

No

No

Their shout be a international licence for this product and all copy's (maker's) to be brought for court. otherwise they shout pay royalties to the aboriginal people

Lars from United Kingdom

Yes

No

I think it is disgusting. It would be like selling the bible if you are a muslim.

Lionel from France

Yes

No

(as much of exploited countries )that even more will put the customers in states of suspicions bus they same do not know exactly in what they can have faith the salesman or their knowledge limited.But that return has to say that as in many domains only the people "enlightened" the values of the things know. the problems in the broad sense and that too many information (often deform)"kill"information and brings confusion to the people eager to have an object having an ethnic identity.

Anonymous

No

No

Again - very sad and this makes me angry as we mislead

Lori from USA

No

No

There should be laws protecting the artwork and images and those violating these laws should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. Any financial proceeds from these lawsuits should go to the Aboriginal people to uphold their traditions and culture.

Louis Block from USA

Yes

No

Money makes money while lies generate a larger profit and if they lie to make a larger profit it only hurts the people who already have nothing now I start to cry for the inhumanity openly committed against people who know no better.

Lucas Sayer from Australia

Yes

No

By doing this writing or saying that it is aboriginal made states that obviously the salesperson knows that the products is not as good as that made by an aboriginal. It shows that the consumer wants the best and for the second best to be sold they have to claim that it is better than it is and its an obvious fact that an aboriginal musical instrument would be of higher quality if it were made by aboriginals.

Anonymous

No

No

They should let them know when they purchase it.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

This is very deceiving. I dislike lying for self gain.

Malcolm Pengelley from United Kingdom

No

No

Trades description should show who made the item and decoration for sale and be legally binding. If the decoration used is from the Aboriginal culture and produced by non Aboriginals then it should be labelled as Aboriginal type image. Similarly with the actual didge itself. I can't see that a natural resource as a termite eaten tree trunk can be claimed to be Aboriginal but the finished article should be named after the people doing the work.

Marijo from Germany

No

No

Not good!!!

Anonymous from USA

No

No

It makes me unsure about buying a Didgeridoo from anywhere because I could be buying a fake and would supplementing those who make the fakes.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I thought this would probably be the case however I believe it should not be so. It should be clearly stated whether the didgeridoo including the images are genuine or not.

Mark Strauss from USA

No

No

It is a shame that this is the case and that the Aboriginal people are not recognized.

Marty Fisher from Australia

Yes

No

Intellectual property of the Aboriginal people in Australia is of utmost importance and the recognition of this equally important. Sick of cheap rip offs disadvantaging Aboriginal people culturally ethically financially spiritually and am sure emotionally.

Matteo from Italy

Yes

No

I really think that business in every fields have ruined the history of the different countries

Matthew Brewster from South Africa

Yes

No

If one is a tourist and enjoying Oz and buys a didj to hang on the wall in his bedroom he knows know different and does he need to? Someone like you and I on the other had who know about didj and the playing of it look for the real thing made by those who live and breath tradition and culture the spirit of the didj is passed on by its maker so who better than the pioneers - the Aboriginal people.

Matthew Smith from USA

No

No

The sound of the didjeridoo is ancient and distinctive as Aboriginal culture and if most trade in them is based on lies or cultural theft -- well there's yet another example of capitalism's inherently exploitive tendencies. If non-aboriginals want to make and enjoy these instruments for their own use it should be done with respect and reverence and not out of greed or hope of profit. Only Aboriginal people and organizations should be able to gain from this industry.

Max Rivera from Peru

No

No

Uhhh this is bad. Mankind is the most complex unprevisable and uncomprensible specie. Man is the most hypocrite and diplomatic specie. Here we are talking about lies and hypocrisy. Man uses masks and in the facts shown above a big and ugly mask of money and power is used. There is a need of intervention of people cause we need to stop this abuses. There's no right. **** In the next part of questions I can not understand which is the meaning of 'clearly state' so for my absence of information and known I will mark don't care. Remember it doesn't means I really don't care.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

They are lying to the consumer and the aboriginals.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

The people who make and sell didgeridoos should not say they are made by real aboriginal people. It is false advertising and could cause them some trouble.

Anonymous

No

No

Deception in any form is unacceptable and all artists should be accountable for their products however educating the consumer is more effective than trying to control the artists or salesman.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I think the people of the Earth should share the things that work best for us in the sense of bringing a joint effort to healing the planet.

Anonymous from Finland

Yes

No

Its a offend against the Aboriginals believe and culture that factory made didgeridoos has aboriginal culture images and cheat buyers to believe its "genuine".only a didj made by aboriginal is genuine.

Michael Manning from Australia

No

No

Its time that it changed

Michael Räse from Germany

No

No

It is not good

Michelle from Australia

Yes

No

I am aghast that these practices are still continuing after fairly common knowledge of backpackers working at painting boomerangs etc for the tourist market. A didge is a sacred item but unfortunately many tourists are unaware of the significance and so go 1. for price 2. for slick talk 3. for looks - often bought as an ornament only.

Michelle from Australia

No

No

Aboriginal art should only be practiced by aboriginals.

Mike from USA

No

No

I hate lying. I loath it. If I ever have the funds to purchase a "real" didj I'll buy one from this site. In no way do I want to support liars.

Mike Griffith from USA

Yes

No

I only know the answers to these questions due to your great and informative website. People who manufacture market and sell specific items as "Cultural items" should be paying royalties and should be required to follow the guidelines set forth by the people who's culture is being represented or do I dare say being infringed upon.

Anonymous from Japan

No

No

We Have to care not only didgeridoos but also Aboriginal culture.If only playing didgeridoos We cannot feel so good.

Nicholas Tillinghast-lewman from USA

No

No

I feel that it is deceptive and unprofessional because the customers trust the information on websites. I most definitely would by a didgeridoo from your company.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

Yes

No

I personally think that only didgeridoos should be made by aboriginal people and sold by them. Looking at your next Question I personally think all should be allowed to play them.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I'm not surprised by these statistics. There will always be someone out there trying to make a buck off someone else's good idea or culture. Cynical? Yes Realistic? Yes.

Patrick from USA

Yes

No

There should be some body that certifies didgeridoos as authentic and Aboriginal-made so to allow consumers to make a more informed decision.

Patrick from Australia

Yes

No

It is breaking all copyright law

Paul from Canada

Yes

No

Only aboriginals can or should create a didj.

Paul from USA

No

No

That is not right.

Anonymous

No

No

It needs to be remedied

Philip from USA

Yes

No

Same thing...can't we make this illegal?

Phillip Seaton from USA

Yes

No

How can you stop this practice? You simply cannot. All I can do is to be informed and buy from the artists or their marketers. Being aware is not that hard if you take the time to do research. There will always be those who feel it is okay to make a buck any way they can. I choose not to support them. Rather I buy quality musical instruments from quality craftsmen.

Pierre Cooper from New Zealand

Yes

No

Commerce is not always fair-fender guitars have had their products ripped off for years and in the end fender came up with innovative solutions on how to retain their lead in the marketing and selling of their guitars-the aboriginal community should employ the same tactics. For example fender started selling cheaper versions of their own products through subsidiary companies-the thing is when people are on holiday in aus (anywhere form the gold coast to sydney) they are simply tourists who want a didj to take home and display they aren't necessarily ever going to learn to play it or feel any interest in the cultural background of the instrument-it is this fact that the aboriginal peoples of the northern territories should exploit-ultimately it depends whether the desired outcome is to prevent non-aboriginal makers selling Didjes or whether the aboriginal community wants to get the share of that market-the strategies and outcomes would be different for each scenario

Rachel from Australia

Yes

No

Aboriginal art and cultural images are sacred and should only be shared or used in a commercial way if deemed appropriate by community elders.

Rachel from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Again it is morally wrong to do so.

Randy Ledingham from USA

No

No

Its not right

Rebecca Campbell from Australia

No

No

It should be a federal offence. The Aboriginal art & culture should be protected under national trust. Wake up Government.

Anonymous

No

No

Abhorrent

Anonymous

Yes

No

I feel peace and harmony and I believe in that you saying

Robert from USA

No

No

I think it is an unfortunate but not surprising commentary on the current global economy. On the other hand without the internet I would not have found you!

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

Very very sad! The native people of OZ deserve to be respected and honored.

Ron from USA

Yes

No

I agree with the majority of your respondents that didgeridoos should be clearly labeled as to their origins.

Anonymous

Yes

No

Misrepresentation of the provenance of the didgeridoo by the seller is tantamount to consumer fraud and should be prosecuted. The fines paid by the convicted criminals should be placed in a trust fund to help the aboriginal people.

Sam from USA

No

No

I prefer to get what is advertised

Sam from Australia

Yes

No

I don't think it changes THAT much. To a lot of people a good didgeridoo is a good didgeridoo. If it is done in a deceitful way then that's another matter.

Anonymous from Australia

No

No

I don't care

Santiago from Chile

Yes

No

I think it's very wrong to imitate anything and trying to sell it as an original art. Also deceiving people is something that's not right but don't worry because at the end you pay your own karma.

Scott Hazen from USA

Yes

No

Product labeling and certification is needed. Just as the American Indian People have required here in the USA that all authentic artifacts and traditional representations must be recognized.

Sean Malone from USA

No

No

Sound like fraud to me

Sean from Australia

No

No

I feel there needs to be some kind of system in place so this can no longer happen. The fact that other people are cashing in on their Heritage makes me sick!

Sheri from USA

Yes

No

That it is quite misleading and they should be investigated and legally forced to state these things in their dealings

Anonymous

Yes

No

It is what happens today not just with didgeridoos. Lack of genuinity will still be recognized by the true lovers.

Stano Beták from Slovakia

Yes

No

It is sad. and it's a shame. I don't like it. Here It's called "tourist trap".painted didges that should look like original didges. I'm glad that I know a little bit about that.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

This is wrong. A didgeridoo that is made to copy an aboriginal one should state that this is the case.

Steve from USA

No

No

It's like buying counterfeit items made in China - passed off as the real thing. A sham......

Steve O'Neill from USA

Yes

No

Again I despise the uncaring commercialism of history and the STEALING of aboriginal art in the form of coping it to a "fake" didj just to make a few dollars is just so wrong!

Steven from USA

Yes

No

I feel this is wrong and very disrespectful. Esp. those imported into Australia marketed to unsuspecting tourists. There needs to be some action against such practices.

Anonymous

No

No

Undecided

Teemu from Finland

Yes

No

It makes me sick and sad.

Thor from Australia

Yes

No

Nobody likes being cheated! buyer beware!

Tim from USA

Yes

No

It is wrong. It is the same problem that exists with Native American flutes. Both maker and flute should be identified for the buyer.

Anonymous

No

No

It is deceptive and I would like to know how those people feel.

Anonymous

No

No

It is wrong and dishonest.

Anonymous from France

Yes

No

There isn't any respect for the aboriginals and nobody says something about it (law)for me it is stealing culture and music

Tom Maucher from USA

Yes

No

It's a marketing ploy to fool the public. The "buying public" needs to be educated to a lot of information. Hopefully this will prevent more rip-offs and deception and put the money where it is sorely needed.

Tom from USA

Yes

No

It's a global market and it's a shame that it happens. How can it be regulated though?

Tony from Canada

Yes

No

Like wine there needs to be an approval process

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

No

There should be a law passed to stop this taking place

Anonymous

No

No

The world only think about money the heart is not there so in the end the aboriginal wins

Valerio from Italy

No

No

This is what is called fraud..

Anonymous

Yes

No

I was shopping for a Didge recently. If you are new into the Didge shopping you get lost! They try to justify the authenticity with a higher price. It should have a genuine seal on each Didge.

Vít from Czech Republic

No

No

Ii is bad!

William Morton from Canada

No

No

It's one thing to make a didj and sell it but you cross the line into being a con man (person?) when you try to present the object as something that it is not. That is fraud. That is a crime.

Xander Van Stenus from Netherlands

No

No

I think that lying about that they are actually made by Aboriginal people is just a fraud but these sales tricks are used more often these days.

Anonymous

No

No

Not fair

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Check out other selections of our visitors' comments:

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

 

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