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Did you know that almost all didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold without clearly stating this fact?

Did you know that many didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold using Aboriginal cultural images or are even sold by deceiving the customer into believing they were made by Aboriginal people?

On this page you can read the answers our visitors gave to this question as part of our yearly visitor surveys, where you can win great prizes.
(we post comments only if permission was given)

Over the years we have asked our visitors many different questions and any of the below topics contain hundreds of comments from people all over the world. Enjoy reading what other people have to say on those subjects:-). If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Name and Country

Did you know ... sold without stating that fact?

Did you know ... sold by deceiving customers?

What do you think or feel about these issue that almost all didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold without clearly stating this fact?
What do you think or feel about these issue that many didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold using Aboriginal cultural images or are even sold by deceiving the customer into believing they were made by Aboriginal people?

Anonymous

Yes

No

It shut bi made more public

Alan from Australia

No

No

I feel strongly that it shouldn't happen it is Aboriginal culture and it means a lot to us

Anonymous

Yes

No

It's hard to make something to change this fact but if I can buy one made by aboriginal I will be grateful!

Alonso Elizondo from Mexico

No

No

I'm depress now.. =..( is clear that our world is taking care more about the money than how we live as a graphic designer (student) I'm trying not to contribute with this kind of facts refuting any work bring at me with this sings of bad intentions.

Andrew Sargent from Australia

No

No

To deliberately deceive someone into thinking that what they are buying is genuinely made buy an Aboriginal person is shameful and shows no respect what so ever to the Aboriginal people and culture. The majority of peoples reasons to buy Aboriginal art didges etc (I think anyway) apart from the beauty and wonder is to try and show a bit of solidarity. The history of this country is disgraceful and deliberate deception buy the non indigenous shows that some people haven't changed in their attitudes but in this racist country and with it's racist leaders it's not that surprising. I wonder if it would be possible to implement some sort of national certificate so the deceitful people would be weeded out and people would know there getting the real deal.

Andy Wood from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Successful and beautiful things are always copied! Music and art are out there in the universe for us to pick up with our inspiration - we don't own them and I don't generally believe in copyright. If the didge has decided to travel the world we can't stop it but no-one shop copy the art of others and pass it off as their own - it is a simple moral issue. The aboriginal people have been abused more than most others but we are all one people

Angela from USA

No

No

I think this is UNETHICAL

Anonymous from Denmark

No

No

It's wrong - both the buyer of a non-authentic-didgeridoo and the Aboriginal people are cheated! The buyer is cheated into thinking he/she has bought an original and the Aboriginal people should receive a certain percentage of the price paid for a non-authentic-didgeridoo.

Anonymous

Yes

No

It is a intellectual theft

Anonymous

No

No

That's really bad.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I wish there were a way to correct this problem so that the Aboriginal people could receive the benefits of their work and not others.

Ben from USA

No

No

I don't know I never really noticed it before but I think that as long as they don't say it aloud then at least they're staying true to the originality of the instrument.

Ben from USA

Yes

No

See previous answer:)

Anonymous

Yes

No

Truth in labeling is important

Bill O'connell from USA

No

No

In the USA several "Indian" markets are open only to proven Native American people. It would seem this Aboriginal situation needs to be regulated in Australia as well.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I think that didgeridoos should be clearly labelled as to their origin.

Bjørn from Norway

Yes

No

It¨s a fraud. There are many other ways to decorate a didje

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I dislike fraud

Brad Powell from USA

No

No

It's not a good idea for non-aboriginals to copy and sell images they know nothing about. These people could inadvertently offend a person of aboriginal blood by using images that are sacred. I've painted pvc didges that I made (for my personal use) with art that was inspired by cave paintings but I was very respectful about the images used. Aboriginal friends have seen the didges I painted and have said I had a "proper feel for the art". Anytime a non-aboriginal person copies or paints an aboriginal image it should be done with great care and respect for the people and culture. It should be done for spiritual or educational purposes and not for monetary gain.

Brenton Roberts from Australia

No

No

They should not try to deceive the customer.

Brian from USA

Yes

No

Same as above. I refuse to purchase from any vendor except those implicitly stating their merchandise is created by Aboriginal people (such as didjshop).

Brian Greed from United Kingdom

Yes

No

It's a shame that these artifacts and images cannot be copyright of the Aboriginal people!

Bruce from Australia

Yes

No

Need some system of authentication to establish genuine articles.

Bryan Auld from USA

Yes

No

As stated above the true didjeridu buyer would appreciate the instrument for the meaning behind the object as well as being an art form. I love the sound and finish quality of mine but if your going to by a didjeridu for its sound alone... go buy a saxophone!

Cal from Australia

Yes

No

I think if Didjes are made by non aboriginal people should state that they were made by non aboriginal people

Caleb Long from USA

Yes

No

Wrong. wrong. wrong. this is as bad as not enforcing the lemon laws on cars you get what you pay for if you want something that has no value save some cash and cop out if you want nothing more than a toy if you want a tool seek the craftsman.

Carl from USA

Yes

No

See my previous comment.

Carol from Canada

No

No

It's unfortunate

Casey from Canada

No

No

It is unfair both to the aboriginal people and to the person who purchases the didgeridoo. It is misleading and completely immoral.

Anonymous

Yes

No

Again its like anything. There are prints on all different types of products that weren't created by those companies...no different.

Chris Trail from Canada

Yes

No

Well as I said the aboriginals are the real true designers but like everything else in the world there are "knockoffs" so to speak. Just the way of life people need to make money somehow even if it stiffs the competition.

Christian from Canada

Yes

No

I know these facts now. But it's not easy to afford a good eucalyptus didj from the true masters.

Christopher from United Kingdom

No

No

Disappointing as this deception must stop even if that would be difficult to do I think.

Anonymous

No

No

Its tasking something special away from aboriginal people

Claude Beaucaire from Canada

Yes

No

There should be copyrights on Aboriginal artefacts.

Anonymous from Germany

Yes

No

This is unfair it should be stated clearly who made and painted the didj-

Anonymous

Yes

No

Terrible and should be stopped

Courtney from USA

No

No

I think lying in any circumstance is horrible. Thankfully my experiences have not supported this but I do not dispute its validity.

Damien from Ireland

No

No

Again a sad reflection on society as a whole and in particular the lack of respect for indigenous people. If any product had a label claiming is was something is was not then Today Tonight and A Current Affair would jump on the band wagon and wax lyrical about it!!

Dan from United Kingdom

Yes

No

I think it wrong but it is the nature of the beast everyone wants a genuine article but are not willing to pay for the real deal and these companies cash in on that.its deceit on all levels.

Dana Doliber from USA

No

No

There needs to be enforceable laws to keep this from happening and people willing to prosecute this injustice.

Dave Feetam from Australia

Yes

No

It is a rip off both to the purchaser and the Aboriginal people!

Anonymous from USA

No

No

People suck

David Lassio from USA

No

No

I feel this is a great injustice to the Aboriginal people and I would like to find a way to correct this.

David Mason from New Zealand

Yes

No

Greed and avarice always look for the easiest targets first! Laziness and lies usually follow close behind. You'll never stop the greedy from misrepresenting themselves or their products in their pursuit of a few equally dollars......but pro-actively raising the profiles of genuine aboriginal crafts people can go a long way to limiting their 'others'!) effectiveness.

David Smith from USA

No

No

Seems to be stealing from Aboriginal people

David from USA

No

No

Not good

Dean Archer from United Kingdom

No

No

I think it should be made clear who made what.

Anonymous from Ireland

Yes

No

It's not fair on the aboriginal people.

Diederik Wydooghe from Belgium

No

No

Dishonesty makes easier money

Dorothy from USA

No

No

Not fair to the Aboriginal people. In the USA there was a similar problem for the Native Americans who make beautiful silver jewellery.

Anonymous from Australia

No

No

Angry that I have been deceived

Ed from Netherlands

No

No

That is a real scandal! To the aboriginals as well as to the buyers.

Ed Obermeyer from USA

No

No

I feel I have been very naive and trusting. I was aware that some of the modern didges were made in other places like Indonesia and India but they did state that they were.

Anonymous from Canada

Yes

No

I don't think it's a very big issue because a lot of people (like myself) aren't buying a didge to have a piece of aboriginal culture per se; they're buying it to have a good quality sounding instrument.

Evert-Jan from Netherlands

Yes

No

Well people who buy a didge are buying the didge because they like the aboriginal culture. So it's nice to get the feeling that the didge was made by real Aboriginal people. By thinking you no it's not but it's just the idea.

Francesco from Italy

Yes

No

I feel sad and I believe it's part of the self-service kind of world we live in: people don't stop for even a second to think about what they eat what they see what they hear. If we want to live in a better world and if we want to respect one another we must start talking about cultural diversity and also the economic side of it.

Frank Fitzpatrick from USA

No

No

This is clearly deceptive and fraudulent. these practices are harmful to the general public as well as the Aboriginal people.

Gareth Carter from South Africa

No

No

The symbols used by a culture could have religious or cultural significance that may or may not be fully understood by a layperson making the didgeridoo. This could come into conflict with what that culture believes or is trying to say.

Gerard School from Netherlands

Yes

No

It's often hard to determine what is genuine but to be sure I would only by from didjshop.com. I bought one already.

Anonymous from Italy

Yes

No

The culture is polluted by business only the true aboriginal didj can clean the air.. playing for the world

Greg from Switzerland

Yes

No

As mentioned in my previous answer. I think it is the responsibility of each individual to give a true representation to what they are making and what they are selling without leading the customer into believing a lie. It comes down to respect.

Hauke Kellner from Germany

Yes

No

Imitating the artwork of Aboriginals is OK for me but the sellers should act fair and disclaim everything. Its a plump lie.

Herman Wennink from Netherlands

Yes

No

So it is again

Anonymous

No

No

Don't loose your soul!!

James from United Kingdom

No

No

After reading this I guess mine is one of these. I bought mine about four years ago for about £40 but didn't really get playing until this year. My attitudes and opinions have changed a lot since then and had I known then what I know now I would have made sure that it was genuine. I will be buying a new one soon......

Anonymous from United Kingdom

Yes

No

They are just jumping onto the band wagon and trying to make money from other peoples heritage.

Jason from USA

Yes

No

It sucks

Jason from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Many of the 'fake' instruments are quite clear to spot as imitations. However when sellers set out to deliberately mislead buyers that is wrong.

Jason from USA

No

No

Using cultural images does not bother me for I see that as giving homage to the creators. Deceiving people into believing that they were made by aboriginal artists is a moral disaster and should not be happening.

Jason from Australia

No

No

Again - I thought it might be the case but not so high a figure...but now it's been pointed out it seems obvious - you see so many didges for sale everywhere...

Javi from Spain

No

No

It's a fraud and it would have to be penalized by the law

Javier from Spain

No

No

There should be a law against this...

Jeff Bottjer from USA

Yes

No

See above

Jill from Australia

Yes

No

Again I feel ashamed and disgusted. I do not understand why there is such inequality in the world. There is no excuse for countries all over the world to exploit the culture of their countries for their own gain and not include the people they exploit it from.

Jim Puckett from USA

No

No

THis also STINKS!

Joao Carvalho from Portugal

No

No

Those fake products copying the real aboriginal brand should be forbidden in the market as other illegal copied-brands are those who sell it should pay high fees for it.

Joao Santos from Portugal

Yes

No

It's a shame using a culture unique.to make money sheeting people.

Anonymous

No

No

They should clearly state that they are not made by aborigines and they shouldn't use the cultural images to deceive the buyers.

Joe from USA

Yes

No

If the Australian government had any concern for the Aboriginal people they would make it a crime to allow such deceitful practices.

Joe Kershner from USA

Yes

No

Again it is unfortunate that so many are so willing to take advantage of the Aboriginal culture and the didjeridu while at the same time taking advantage of the consumer as well as I understand it mainly tourists and foreigners. All for a buck.

John from Canada

Yes

No

Again - commerce over community. We have a similar situation here in BC (Canada) with our aboriginal community with their artwork and imagery. People just take the image usually completely out of context or... and then sell it to the tourist as original Aboriginal art pieces. Usually way cheaper as a knock off (although like your situation still marketed as original work) which limits sales by the true artists as they cannot compete nor should they have to.

Jon Christensen from USA

Yes

No

Again damn commercialism that requires people to lie and cheat just to make a buck.

Jonathan Puhalsky from USA

Yes

No

Most didgeridoo's sold in this manner can be rather expensive. I think the consumer should research where their money is going. If you truly enjoy the art and support the cause than you need to inform yourself. There is a lot of fraud in the art community this is no different.

Jonny Monument from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Discrimination. Imagine Coca Cola or Nike putting up with this! It is plain rip off. No one is free to take someone else's heritage art and way and cash in on it. It's utterly unfair and it seems that certain people who regrettably are in "authority" have no drive to stop it: there must be money in it somewhere for the powers-that-be otherwise this wouldn't be happening. Sad but true.

José Antonio from Mexico

Yes

No

Que es una estafa

Joseph Kern from USA

No

No

I feel extremely mad and cheated. I had always thought that the dealer would tell you who made it and how long they have been doing so. I feel like the concept of a real aboriginal person making it makes the experience of playing it so much more real.

Joy from USA

No

No

It's a shame that greed controls people and allows them to take liberties when they should not

Anonymous

No

No

Unfortunate that laws allow this

Justin Hook from USA

Yes

No

I think that aboriginals should be the only ones allowed to harvest the trees from Australia used for making didjes and anyone selling a didgeridoo that is not made by an aboriginal should have to clearly state it before the sale

Kathy Hornick from USA

No

No

Typical

Katy from USA

No

No

I think that is false advertising and the Aboriginal people should be compensated for the didgeridoos sold.

Anonymous

Yes

No

This one is a real stinker. When I was living in Australia for a few years I bought a didgeridoo at a store in Pitt Street Mall from a person claiming that it was the real deal. I still have my suspicions whether it was actually made by the Aboriginal people. The designs and wood used are unlike those seen on this website or any others for that matter.

Anonymous from Canada

Yes

No

See above.

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

It's not fair the the Aboriginal people.

Kevin from USA

No

No

Its wrong and should be stopped

Kevin Summers from USA

Yes

No

I don't like it at all Personally I own on guaranteed aboriginal crafted Didges except for the three didges I crafted myself. Those three didges I crafted from authentic aboriginal harvested timber that I ordered from an aboriginal site on the web. I will never sell them and the images I painted on them are not reflective of the aboriginal culture.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I feel it is terrible this generation can not tell real from mass produced..I also feel this is one of the reasons the young Aboriginal people are allowing their ancestor art forms to die..

Kristoffer Stensbo-Smidt from Denmark

No

No

As stated above there should be some kind of quality mark on Aboriginal items. It is NOT fair taking advantage of the Aboriginal culture without contributing to its existence.

Anonymous

No

No

No way

Laurence from United Kingdom

No

No

Surely the Aus government or an indigenous peoples organisation should monitor this and stamp out this plagiarism?

Anonymous from Belgium

No

No

This is a scandal too. People may NOT abuse the traditions and cultural images of the aboriginals to make money!! Of course its allowed to make your own didge but don't use pictures of other aboriginal people to put on a didje and certainly not to sell it...

Lee Evans from United Kingdom

No

No

Criminal!!!!!!

Levi from Brazil

No

No

That is disgusting!!! So the didj are sell like original and they are not... completely wrong!

Libby from USA

No

No

It makes sense that they might deceive customers into believing that but it unsettling that people are making business off of a blatant lie and that customers are being jipped.

Linda Hendricks from USA

Yes

No

It is not fair at all

Anonymous from Australia

No

No

It sucks

Linda from USA

No

No

I think it should be clearly stated if the didj is not made by Aboriginal people. That is only fair.

Anonymous

Yes

No

It's unfair but I'm not surprised. Much of modern marketing is set up to encourage the buyer to make incorrect assumptions (to the disadvantage of the buyer and in this case to the Aboriginal people as well).

Liz from Australia

Yes

No

It makes me angry! This flagrant dishonesty devalues culture craftsmanship authenticity and artistry. It unfairly positions the work of imposters as equal to the beautiful work of indigenous people and that is criminal.

Luciano from Argentina

No

No

Its sad that people try to deceive the customers. As I said before it should be stated if the didj and the art have an aboriginal origin. It's ok if a non aboriginal artist want to paint aboriginal designs but he should state that he's not an aborigine and that he's emulating or being inspired by aboriginal art. Each customer should be able to choose freely about his purchase.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I don't think it's fair to the consumer or the Aboriginal artists.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I think that they're serious issues and people shouldn't be being deceived like that.

Marc from Luxembourg

Yes

No

Non aboriginal didges should unmistakably be advertised as such. But it is also the responsibility of the customer to inform himself on these facts and to know what he ' s buying... OK I fell for it too when I bought my first cheap bamboo didge:)

Anonymous from Australia

No

No

Someone should do something

Marcus Holm-Petersen from Germany

Yes

No

I feel sad about it. As I said so many people don't know what they do because out of greed and ignorance about the truth.

Margaret from USA

Yes

No

I made a sleeve for my burned didge using a beaded pattern inspired by authentic artwork but would prefer indigenous peoples get the money.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

The aboriginal community should pursue and lobby diligently to be able to have their individual talents and endeavours acknowledged. Everyone should be able to express their talents and make an honest living.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

The person selling the didgeridoo shouldn't use their aboriginal cultural images unless they have permission and are accurate of the real images.

Anonymous

No

No

Pissed

Mary Lindhart from USA

Yes

No

I think it time we change this

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Truth

Matthew from USA

Yes

No

There are many bad people out there who use these fakes and sell them using deception. If it is not against the law it should be.

Matthew from Canada

Yes

No

As stated it is a tragic reality. Likely the majority of these didgeridoos will not be played but were purchased as souvenirs by overseas travellers.

Anonymous

No

No

People should respect other peoples heritage and not profit from by selling something that is not genuine.

Max Nelson from USA

No

No

Again more bullshit

Meri from Australia

No

No

All covered in above

Michael from USA

No

No

The public at large are being deceived and cheated. there should be a law protecting both the buyers and the Aboriginal people.

Michael Potter from Australia

No

No

That's unfortunate. But it seems to me that the person or persons who are asking these questions have issues. And by the look of the questions below they could be racist. They definitely are unhappy people.

Michael Sleiman from Canada

Yes

No

Its true but that sis because they want the authentic look. Craftsmanship is important and imitation occurs all around but there is nothing that can be done.

Anonymous from Finland

Yes

No

Its thieving

Anonymous

Yes

No

How do you do it?

Anonymous from Canada

Yes

No

Don't care

Nick Buckley from USA

Yes

No

Again this is going to happen - with the ease of marketing that the internet provides people the customers are unable to see the product "in the flesh" before buying and that leaves them open to abuse by the seller. "Get out clauses" are also often written in the small print which leave the buyer with no recourse or rights.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I wish most people were honest and sincere but I know we do not live in a perfect world.

Nicole from USA

Yes

No

There should be strict laws with prison as consequence. Because as long as there is no consequences then it won't stop.

Numa Lallemand from Belgium

No

No

I feel disappointed when I think of it. Sometime I buy eucalyptus made didge and the sound is for me the most important but if I buy an aboriginal product I want it to be aboriginal. I need honesty

Anonymous from Ireland

No

No

I think deceiving people into believing they are purchasing a didj made by an Aboriginal person is wrong. I also think using there cultural images while not fully morally correct is inevitable. People copy ideas and designs all the time not just in this area.

Patty from Canada

No

No

I don't think there should be deceit in any transaction but I'm sure some people just want a didj and don't care who made it. Could aboriginal Didjes have some marking that specifies it as being 'authentic' so that if non-aboriginals used that symbol it could result in litigation?

Paul Brown from USA

Yes

No

Not cool!

Paul Cyr from USA

Yes

No

People these days. Dealing with what the world's become isn't always easy and facts like this just make it all the more difficult.

Paul Meneghini from Italy

Yes

No

I feel like shamed it was a real offence to the aborigines of Australia

Anonymous

No

No

I'm not sure I believe that

Peter Callinicos from USA

Yes

No

Like counterfeiting money!

Peter Jackson from New Zealand

Yes

No

It certainly is on the nose!

Anonymous

No

No

People will do anything

Phil Flowers from United Kingdom

No

No

These practices should be outlawed vigorously enforced and hopefully put an end to.

Rachael from Switzerland

No

No

Aboriginal images belong to Aboriginal people and their culture - it is not right for others to appropriate those images and that culture for their own financial gain.

Ravyn Nimchuk from USA

Yes

No

It is the market. Many people are very "plastic" (Plastic meaning that they want it all now and must be looking pretty underfed and have multimillion dollar homes a cell phone and know who was cast out of the top ten American Idol categories. People want to feel like they have an authentic piece even if they know it is not. From my experience many people are able to fool them selves into thinking that they have the real thing and while tones and artwork are exact it still is not authentic. I much would prefer an authentic didj however I also am practical so far as funds are concerned. I do not have the money to fly down to Australia play the Didgeridoos to find that perfect fit or tone. I understand that I want to play one so I must compromise in some way.

Richard from South Africa

Yes

No

The Oz govt needs to recognise the unique nature of the didj as an Aboriginal cultural artefact and safeguard this uniqueness by legislating that only didjes made by Aboriginal people be allowed to use Aboriginal imagery. At the least non-indigenous didjes should be clearly labelled as such!

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

I think it is terrible

Robert from USA

No

No

Like most items imported from other countries the Didjes should be clearly marked from country of origin to try and prevent false claims made from sales

Roger from USA

Yes

No

I feel that this is wrong and dilutes the cultural expression even though the end result of a persons temporary or longer use of any product or artifact.

Rose from USA

No

No

These are issues that must be globally promulgated. How many people would pay substantial sums of money if they knew they were getting a "faux" didj. Another important facet of this is that Aboriginal people make didjes from wood that has been hollowed out naturally by termites. That can't be said of other didjes whose manufacture may be contributing to deforestation.

Roy Páramo from Spain

Yes

No

It is sooo unfair! Unfortunately most people don't know or don't care about this not helping to solve the problem.

Roy Wykoff from USA

Yes

No

When you have sellers out there who try to con people into thinking there product is the real thing they are looking at Money and not being honest to the public. In Arizona we have the same problems with Native American products.

Rupert from United Kingdom

No

No

There should be a license category for didges so only genuine ones can carry such images and then maybe more money could be returned into the aboriginal community.

Ryan from USA

Yes

No

A individual purchasing a didge should know exactly what they are buying. Many could say that this falls into a "buyer beware" category but when a customer is being fed lies about who constructed their didge and where their money is going there should be more than bad karma heading in the sellers direction.

Ryan from USA

No

No

I think it should be against the law to misrepresent an item in that way. I believe it disrupts the authentic sales of these items and the people who buy are mislead.

Anonymous

Yes

No

It's a fact that exist in almost everything nowadays. Can't help it. However I don't have to follow the mass.

Samiul Ghani from United Kingdom

Yes

No

I think the commodification of any culture is despicable especially so when coupled with the exploitation and marginalisation of that culture as has happened with the aboriginal. Didgeshop.com is one of those few organisations that highlights these issues and alleviates the problems by encouraging aboriginal artistry and consumer appreciation.

Sandra from USA

Yes

No

I was in Melbourne at their public market and someone from china was selling china junk and Didgeridoos and I knew they were junk

Anonymous

Yes

No

Disgusted

Sharon Calvert from USA

No

No

I think it is morally and ethically wrong. Every single didgeridoo made for sale by non-native people need to be clearly marked as such. Deception is wrong. Aboriginal cultural images are supposed to be protected (ie.intellectual property rights)

Sheridan from Australia

No

No

Gee that's not good for the aboriginal communities whom do make them. kinda cultural fraud really I'm not surprised though or impressed.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Not altogether surprising given the world we live in

Stan from USA

No

No

Should be a law against such misrepresentations.

Anonymous from Australia

No

No

Again disappointed

Steven Lloyd from Canada

No

No

After the first stat it doesn't surprise me about the next ones.most people have no exp. with or haven't learned about the products they are selling. a sales person after educating him self he should inform the customer all about the item he is selling. Unfortunate again lying is not cool.

Sybil from Australia

Yes

No

It is a shame that your culture has been taken from you and then copied to make money.

Anonymous from Canada

Yes

No

I personally think that people want you to think that aboriginals made them but most people don't really care who makes them just as long as they look good in their home as decoration. The only people who really care are the people who know about them and are intrigued by them.

Anonymous

No

No

If someone is going to sell one it should be made clear and honest whether or not it is a genuine Aboriginal craft not only is it false advertising but some people may only want to pay for an Aboriginal craft for ethical or other reasons.

Todd from USA

No

No

Understanding the culture I would see this as an infringement on their rights which should be protected by the government.

Tom from USA

Yes

No

I feel angry that their are people in the world that take advantage of this.

Tomas from USA

Yes

No

Lying about anything is never good for marketing purposes or whatever.

Tony Romano from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Saddened and angry

Triinu from Estonia

Yes

No

It should not be like this

Tyler Kehoe from USA

Yes

No

I think its even sadder.

Victor Remmers from Netherlands

Yes

No

Now that's another question. It should be clear weather a Didge is original or a replica

Anonymous

Yes

No

Ça c'est pas normal du tout. çe me dégoute de voir des choses comme ça.

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Check out other selections of our visitors' comments:

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

 

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