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Did you know that almost all didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold without clearly stating this fact?

Did you know that many didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold using Aboriginal cultural images or are even sold by deceiving the customer into believing they were made by Aboriginal people?

On this page you can read the answers our visitors gave to this question as part of our yearly visitor surveys, where you can win great prizes.
(we post comments only if permission was given)

Over the years we have asked our visitors many different questions and any of the below topics contain hundreds of comments from people all over the world. Enjoy reading what other people have to say on those subjects:-). If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Name and Country

Did you know ... sold without stating that fact?

Did you know ... sold by deceiving customers?

What do you think or feel about these issue that almost all didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold without clearly stating this fact?
What do you think or feel about these issue that many didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are sold using Aboriginal cultural images or are even sold by deceiving the customer into believing they were made by Aboriginal people?

Aaron from Canada

No

No

Robbery

Aaron from Germany

No

No

I have no direct experience with this. I have only shopped at a Didj shop in California that clearly explained who made each Didj.

Anonymous

Yes

No

To deceive someone into believing something false like that is terrible. Anyone who practices this is not a professional and should not be allowed the privilege and responsibility of selling didgeridoos or anything else for that matter.

Alain Di Carlo from Italy

Yes

No

Would want us laws and very severe punishments but above all more humanity and less egoism.

Albert Russell from USA

No

No

I believe this is very wrong.

Alexandre from Portugal

Yes

No

This fact is bad both for the customer who will be fooled into buying a low quality product and for the aboriginal people who see their products being replaced by bad quality ones. Not only the cultural part is affected but also the economical

Anonymous from Canada

No

No

Should be stopped

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Unfortunate

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I think this is sad I didn't know any of these facts in fact I never even gave it a second thought. If I was shopping for an item and the company selling it stated that it was made by a specific group/etc I wouldn't think to question that. Guess I will think twice. In fact I just ordered handmade photo albums as Christmas gifts and they were advertised as free trade and that they were made by individual artists in villages in other countries I'm hoping that was true I guess no way to really tell if it wasn't. Thank you for the information.

Anonymous

No

No

It is an outrage for the Aboriginal culture.

Anonymous

No

No

Not good idea

Angel Cabrera Rodriguez from Spain

Yes

No

Again lack of ethics.

Anonymous

No

No

Sadder

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Very unfair

Anthony Plakias from Australia

No

No

It really does not matter who makes them at all. What really does matter that is to make sure the images and the art work are designed according to the customs.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I think once again I am ashamed to say that corporate America has once again taken away the meaning of an "honest sale." I feel that respect is due to the original creators of this fine instrument. I think it's terrible that didgeridoos are sold to people with the impression that they were all made by the Aboriginal people. If the one they are buying wasn't made by the Aboriginal people then the consumer should be made aware of that. In regards to the money. If the didgeridoo was made by an Aboriginal person then all those proceeds should go back to them. However if it wasn't and it was made by some other company then only a part of the proceeds should go to the Aboriginal people.

Anonymous

No

No

I don't think this is right at all and some control should be placed

Anonymous

No

No

Not good

Barbara from Australia

Yes

No

I think it should be clearly stated and legislation should be imposed to ensure that genuine products are not replicated artificially for the purpose of deceiving customers and generating profits. The aboriginal artifact market was created initially from tourist interest into local aboriginal history and culture therefore replicas do nothing but diffuse the authenticity of the culture.

Barbara from USA

Yes

No

I found out when I started shopping for a didgeridoo that there are millions of them out there and almost none of them are made by Aboriginal people. I was very glad to find your site and that is why I'm buying from you.

Barry Shrimpton from New Zealand

Yes

No

There should be a special tax on all didjeridoos sold like the royalties on music discs etc. That way a percentage would be paid to the Aboriginal people for every Didgeridoo made.

Bart Vrancken from Netherlands

Yes

No

It's unacceptable

Benjamin from USA

No

No

I feel that it is intellectual theft. Also that the merchants that use deceit should be fined for that as well as for the Aboriginal royalties.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

No

While it's okay for non-Aboriginals to use Aboriginal images it needs to be made clear that such images are non-Aboriginal

Beth from USA

No

No

Shameful

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Seems similar to the problems of the Native Americans in this country.

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

I think that a didjeridu sales person that is lying about the origins of their Didgeridoos and claiming that it Aboriginal made is doing the entire Aboriginal culture and race a severe injustice.

Billy from USA

No

No

I think that it should be made illegal for those people to do this.

Blaine from Canada

Yes

No

It is stripping away one of the cultural aspects of Aboriginals.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I think the Aborigines need a more organized approach to the misleading marketing of the didgeridoos... and other native articles sold as original when they are not.

Brad Lackey from USA

Yes

No

That should be illegal. In New Mexico we have that trouble with fake turquoise Indian jewelry. They have passed legislation to make it illegal to claim it is Indian made if it is not.

Brad Olson from USA

Yes

No

The didge should not be falsely represented. I think there a seal of authenticity.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Great

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

Its not being impeccable nor is it really honoring the tradition. Like it should be.

Anonymous

No

No

Sad

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

Again very unfair

Anonymous from Australia

Yes

No

I think it is criminal

Bruno from Australia

No

No

It's a farce and enrages me to think that after the unspeakable injustices committed nothing is being done to protect the aboriginals right to promote their heritage.

Carla from United Kingdom

No

No

I can't say I have a problem with it personally but I think a fair few people would.

Anonymous

Yes

No

Extremely distressed by this because purchases on most occasions are falsely satisfying buyers. Aboriginal communities should not have to compete against greedy businessmen to express their own culture.

Carol from USA

No

No

Perhaps the Aboriginal people could get the message out to the world for those of us wanting to buy items should only buy from them.

Carole from USA

No

No

Don't

Cass from USA

Yes

No

Pure deception and Pure Theft

Catherine from USA

No

No

That just isn't right and it makes me mad.

Chad from Canada

Yes

No

I feel that these images are owned by aboriginal people and their rights should be upheld. When people capitalize from misleading information they are stealing pride and respect from aboriginal people and they should be ashamed

Chalton Monteiro from Brazil

No

No

That is piracy.

Charlie from USA

No

No

It seems like false advertisement to me. That's not how I would run my business!

Anonymous from Australia

No

No

Again very unfair.

Chris Scott from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Its very wrong but sadly its the way of the world these days and I can't see it changing in a hurry. There will always be some ass hole ready to make a buck off someone else's back. Sucks but what can you do.

Anonymous

No

No

Deceptive marketing of a product is a common sales technique and I feel that it is deplorable. A company that cannot sell their product on its own merits should not be making that product.

Christopher Benbow from United Kingdom

No

No

It's a same people are using images they don't understand

Christopher from Australia

Yes

No

STUPID (as above)

Anonymous

No

No

I think that leading people to believe something is made by Aboriginal people when it isn't should be a crime.

Cierra from USA

No

No

Even worse so people make someone else's culture theirs and don't tell the truth. I believe the truth will come out some how. An now that I know this I'll make sure to buy products like this from this site only(at least I know it's authentic) and I will get a piece of real Aboriginal culture and the feel its presence within my spirit home etc. I feel bad for them an now that I know the truth I will let others know if there thinking about aboriginal items. I'm korean/black I know exactly how the Aboriginals feel about culture being stolen from them it hurts and I wanna say"keep love in your heart an the truth will turn out keep your head up"

Cindy from USA

No

No

Fraud

Clarence from USA

Yes

No

That's the only way they can get people to buy them

Clark Berryman from Canada

No

No

It reminds me of the "dream-catchers" of the native peoples of canada which are sold in tourist shops and gas stations and are probably manufactured in china.

Claude Beauaire from Canada

No

No

I think that Aboriginal Art should be copyrighted.

Claudio from Chile

Yes

No

I think that he is shameful that nobody has the right to lack the respect to something as deep as the beliefs of a whole town

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

I think that if a seller plans to demean someone else's culture they should at least have the decency to tell the buyer.

Anonymous

No

No

Its wrong

Connie from USA

No

No

Shameful!

Craig from Canada

Yes

No

I have a lot of native friends here in Canada and this type of treatment and cultural theft of the native population occurs here too. It is deplorable.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I think the Aboriginal people have cause for a suit against the deceiving vendors.

Dale from USA

Yes

No

They should be clearly labelled. We also need to mount an education campaign.

Dan Desmarais from Canada

Yes

No

I think it takes a coward to hide behind someone else's culture. I love aboriginal art and I must admit that I have practiced aboriginal dot art on canvas but it was strictly for my own personal gain and not to make money.

Dan Snell from USA

No

No

This issue I believe is wrong because they are tricking the customer into thinking they are buying an authentic didgeridoo when they are really not

Dane from Australia

Yes

No

Makes me wild! Should have to state if what you are getting is genuine or wha!

Anonymous

No

No

Any inferior quality products then looks bad on the Aboriginal people who were not involved in their production nor did they receive income from the product.

Darin Petersen from USA

Yes

No

From my perspective ( being Native American/Hawaiian) it seems like its just a new form of the old colonial mind set.

Darlene Demos from USA

Yes

No

It's not fair to either party. The Aboriginal people are excluded from their rightful claim /their creations and the consumer is deceived.

Darrel Haltmann from South Africa

No

No

As above Its a rip off

Anonymous

No

No

Not good

Darren from Australia

No

No

If you are borrowing a style from a particular culture it should be made clear if being sold that it wasn't created by a person from that culture. Also a non-cultural person using cultural images for monetary gain and passing them off as genuine for profits is wrong and disrespectful to the culture. The misuse of certain cultural images could be quite distressing to a culture. On the flip side I wouldn't think much of cultural people exploiting their own culture for just monetary gain as this would dilute the value and importance of their culture and reduce the quality of the art.

Dave from USA

Yes

No

Sad

Anonymous

No

No

Sellers should donate

David from USA

No

No

Not enough details to make an opinion. Is Australia a communist state? No! pay the Aborigines what they deserve and create value for their products and everything will be alright.

Anonymous

No

No

That's horrible

David from Canada

No

No

I do not approve of the mock traditional instrument.

David from Germany

Yes

No

This is how it is done with all products that are originally from any certain region in the world.

David Ponicki from USA

Yes

No

See previous answer

Deb from USA

No

No

That is fraud.

Anonymous

No

No

I believe it's fraud to claim an item is an authentic instrument made by the Aboriginal people when it isn't. I've never seen any culture's designs/images used exclusively (native americans africans) unless they are trade marked.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I don't like that fact and think that it should be stated on the didgeridoos

Diana from USA

No

No

There should be new laws enacted.

Anonymous

No

No

That is deceiving people

Diane from USA

Yes

No

I know that some synthetic didgeridoos are made and decorated using designs that are from the People. And I think that's part of the lure of a Didgeridoo. However I think anyone who sells Didgeridoos not made by the people should put actually make it a point to let the customer know exactly what they're getting.

Anonymous

Yes

No

Totally ridiculous

Anonymous from USA

No

No

No

Donald from Australia

Yes

No

I think it's disgraceful and people should be made more aware but unfortunately as we are in the minority it's very hard. But keep up the good work hopefully it will pay off

Drew from USA

Yes

No

It is a shame. I am glad that the Didjshop supplies only authentic merchandise.

Anonymous from Netherlands

Yes

No

Horrible again

Edward from USA

No

No

The Aboriginal people should be given there cultural and historical due. The "other" didgeridoos should be labeled as nontraditional.

Elisha Manthis from USA

Yes

No

I think it is very deceiving of any company to omit these facts about their product. it makes a costumer feel as if they weren't important enough to receive a genuine artifact or piece of art.

Ellen Lopes from USA

No

No

I know there is probably nothing to be done about it technically but I think the word needs to be sent out so more people know the facts and will walk away accordingly.

Eostar from USA

Yes

No

If the aboriginal cultural images are made with the intention to deceive then it's wrong. If they are made simply because they are beautiful and they are evocative of the mysteries and the transcendental depth of the aboriginal mind then it should be OK. Everything depends on the intention one has.

Eric Andries from Belgium

Yes

No

This an illegal practice.

Eric from USA

No

No

Once again it makes me upset. I think if you aren't from australia then don't pretend and use their art work its bad enough we are using their instruments for our own greed.

Eric Frisbee from USA

No

No

Stealing is stealing. Lying is lying no gray area can exist.

Anonymous from Colombia

Yes

No

The costumers should have the eyes wide open. Many people can make the didgeridoos with copies of aboriginal art without being but one can search a little for the characteristics of the real ones and can know when it's original. Art is art and it's quality can be detected.

Anonymous

Yes

No

Same as above it is wrong

Frances from USA

No

No

Again very sad. But that's what cultures in power tend to do: appropriate and co-opt native peoples culture and livelihood. It happens in North America too and I'm sure this happens all over the world. As a marketer it makes me sick how my profession often contributes to this deception and theft--although no one will call it that.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I think no a lot of people understand now the world is in the hand of the fox people and for this people nothing are important except they

Frederick Ashplant from USA

Yes

No

It is very upsetting and I think there should be a standard verification/authentication process.

Gabrielle Littlefield from Australia

Yes

No

Aboriginal people have cultural ownership of didgeridoos this must be acknowledged respected and upheld by the law and benefits of sales being rewarded to aboriginal people

Garry from Australia

Yes

No

Common practice with retail products around the world.

Gary from USA

Yes

No

Not good.

Gary Cooper from USA

No

No

I know it is wrong as I had written in my answer earlier. I feel "cut" for these people. They have my prayers.

Gary from USA

No

No

That sucks dude

Gavin Bamber from Canada

No

No

Sad

Anonymous from Germany

No

No

I am feeling bad again as I do not know where my didges come from. I think this is wrong and Aborigines should be supported more. There should be trademark or something to protect the rights of Aboriginal people.

George Walsh from USA

No

No

Sad and angry at the deception.

Gerrit Lacroix from Netherlands

Yes

No

Personally I think: Let the buyer beware!!! But again on a personal basis I also consider this malpractice.

Anonymous

No

No

I think that is terrible and it is cheating these people

Graeme from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Poor; give the right people their right to preserve their heritage /culture!!

Grant from United Kingdom

No

No

The sale of didges should be like food a nd have its place of origin displayed

Anonymous

No

No

It's another disgrace

Gregg Nardozza from USA

Yes

No

As I said above... a complete shame. People are robbing the aborigines of their due rewards for bringing to us the most incredible instrument and artwork ever known to man.

Gregory Ling from USA

No

No

I think people should become more aware of these issues so they can make an educated decision about purchasing a Didje or other type of aboriginal art/instrument.

Anonymous from Italy

No

No

We should respect the Aboriginals and their culture and images but I think they shouldn't say its Aboriginal made if its not

Anonymous from Mexico

No

No

What a fake

Henry Saavedra from Japan

No

No

Businesses will do anything to make a sale I think you are on the right track here in trying to educate people about these facts.

Herb Cohen from USA

No

No

I think the public probably wouldn't know enough to question such and this cheats the aboriginal artisans of commerce that should be theirs and cheats the public by paying a good price for a probably inferior product.

Hillel from Australia

No

No

This dishonesty pisses me off! There needs to be some way of protecting real aboriginal art!

Anonymous from USA

No

No

That's disrespectful to the people

Iain Tidmarsh from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Again saddened and angry

Anonymous

Yes

No

Art is a universal it is not always possible to identify the source of goods without a mark of authenticity.

Ilian Ninov from Bulgaria

Yes

No

I think that the making a didgeridoo is a magic. And the symbols on the didges are something very special if they are done with such intention they are magic too:). And this is like the monks from shaolin which are traveling around the world and showing their technique - you see only what is from the outside some funny movements and after that the lay down to very sharp knifes they brake bricks on them and they are in all peace without even a scratch. The real thing is inside the breathing the power come from inside with the symbols and images is the same you could draw anything that you want but the real thing is very different. So maybe this is better in this way I know that this things must be much more honest like "deceiving the customer into believing they were made by Aboriginal people" but maybe the way it is is better.

Irene from Macedonia (FYR)

No

No

Deceiving people? It's all about it. Unfortunately.

Jack from USA

No

No

Sounds like someone is making a lot of money at their expense which is not fair.

Jack Whelan from USA

No

No

It's not fair but it's typical

Jackie from USA

Yes

No

Unless use of the Aboriginal cultural images violates a copyright law there is nothing wrong with using those images. Images from many their cultures around the word are used frequently outside of their original context. HOWEVER -- Customers should never be deceived about the origins of the instrument they are purchasing and cultural imagery should not be used as a means of deception. Ever. That is false advertising which is illegal in the United States. That being said if such things are not pursued there will not likely be a resolution of the problem. Ultimately it falls on the customer to make sure he/she is getting the expected merchandise.

James from USA

Yes

No

Like I said--its not right

James Hoege from USA

Yes

No

Should be a law against it

James Lewis from United Kingdom

No

No

I think that is appalling if the didge is not made by an aboriginal then it should not be described as having been made by one.

James Whiteford from United Kingdom

No

No

I think the law should be changed to comply with authentic material and fraud if it is not stated that the item is not authentic.

Anonymous

No

No

Not right I am disgusted

Anonymous

No

No

Not right

Javier from Spain

No

No

Esta muy mal

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

I don't want them then

Jean from USA

No

No

Again I feel this is outrageous and horrible. Unfortunately I am not surprised -- just another example of how unethical and deviant mankind has become.

Jean from USA

No

No

I wish something could be done about it.

Anonymous

Yes

No

That's just sick

Jeffrey Levine from USA

No

No

I think that this is an obvious instance of fraud and it must be exposed to the public at every turn.

Jennifer from Australia

Yes

No

I have regularly been told by salespeople that I would be buying 'original' pieces by artists in specific tribes but when I pressed further they made up details including the areas the tribes lived.

Jennifer White from Canada

No

No

I think out right lying is unnecessary. I bought a Djembe drum made by my neighbour who is British descent not African and I knew that but still wanted the drum he makes. Lets leave the deceit out of it. Also I am an artist and I painted my own didj. Why not? I am human. Last I checked freedom to express to create is very important. But I did not say someone else painted it. My cultural images include the world community now.

Jennifer from USA

No

No

Well it seems that most people are out to make a buck. Its a shame that it is this way. Makes me sad.

Anonymous

No

No

I'm glad I now know this

Jeremy from USA

No

No

It's completely unacceptable.

Jerry from USA

Yes

No

That sucks!

Jerry from USA

No

No

I feel that this is false advertising and that the government of australia should regulate and legislate to correct this injustice.

Anonymous

No

No

I think it common sense that selling any item under false pretense is wrong and that true respecters of native Australian Culture should at LEAST give some of the money they make on that native culture to preserving it and its peoples.

Jessanna from USA

No

No

I would more closely check into the product before buying it!

Jessica from USA

No

No

It's not right

Jim from USA

Yes

No

I feel that "nondisclosure" is immoral and unethical. As long as cultural images are not copied exactly I don't see a problem with that. Misleading and/or deceiving customers is wrong. Indigenous peoples should be honored and respected for their artwork. Unfortunately there are always those that will scheme cheat deceive etc. to make a profit. Most respectable sites selling Native American Flutes will say whether it is a Native American "Style" Flute or not. The will in fact direct you to several sites of genuine Native American Flute makers it that is what you are interested in. All "we" can do is be discerning and do our research before supporting anyone claiming to be the genuine article - due diligence.

Jim from USA

Yes

No

Horrified

Jim Davis from Canada

Yes

No

There should be a law stating the seller must make it known whether the item being sold is authentic or not.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

That's fraud in my opinion.

Jim Wegner from USA

No

No

Again not surprising. If I were selling non-Aboriginal didgeridoos I would not advertise the fact although I would like to think I would not deliberately deceive people. I would also like to comment on the following six questions (although I don't think you'll like my comments): 1) Only Aboriginal people should be allowed to play didgeridoos: People all around the world play didgeridoos. To suggest that only Aboriginal people should be allowed to do so is a position so extreme it is laughable. This is akin to insisting that one must be of Scottish descent to play bagpipes. It wouldn't exactly help your business either. 2) Only Aboriginal people should be allowed to make didgeridoos: A didgeridoo is essentially a stick which has been hollowed out by termites. I am not Australian so I am unfamiliar with your patent laws but I would be surprised if blowing through a hollow stick you found would be patentable. If it were I would guess that the patent would have expired long ago. To continue the Scottish analogy this would mean that only Scots would be allowed to make bagpipes. 3) Only Aboriginal people should be allowed to paint Aboriginal designs: Artists and non-artists alike have been inspired by their predecessors throughout history. There is a difference between inspiration and plagiarism however. To incorporate traditional Aboriginal designs into one's work is fine. To copy a particular Aboriginal artist's work is not. Only Scots may weave plaid? 4) Non-Aboriginal didgeridoo makers should pay royalties to Aboriginal people or organisations: I don't expect any royalties from bagpipe sales despite my one-eighth Scottish heritage. It is no more reasonable for an Aboriginal person to expect royalties from sales of a traditional unpatentable instrument discovered by an unknown ancestor an unknown number of centuries ago. 5) Any didgeridoo sold should clearly state if it is not made by an Australian Aboriginal person: Non-Aboriginal people should not be required to label work they have every right to produce. This would imply that it is of inferior quality. While this is undoubtedly true in the majority of cases it is not necessarily so. I personally would prefer to purchase an Aboriginal didgeridoo so I would like some way of distinguishing between the two but I do not believe a requirement to label non-Aboriginal didgeridoos is the best approach. Voluntarily labeling Aboriginal didgeridoos as such would be preferable. This is something consumers would learn to look for and be willing to pay a premium for. 6) Any painted didgeridoo sold should clearly state if it is painted by an non-Aboriginal person: See above.

Anonymous from Czech Republic

Yes

No

Pretension is always a bad thing and with this it's no less worse. It's a pity. I don't mind didgeridoos with specific images(I've once seen a didgeridoo with Frank Zappa's moustache on it:) but in this case we're discussing a fake-making. Which is by the way illegal. I believe it's a bit of an outrage for Aboriginals.

Joe from USA

Yes

No

Concerned parties should pass legislation stopping that practice

Johan Thaens from Belgium

Yes

No

Giving as much as possible information is the only thing we can do.

John Blanchard from USA

Yes

No

Counterfeiters need to be prosecuted.

John from USA

Yes

No

I definitely think that this is wrong and even fraudulent. I believe that there should be required truthful labeling on didges and would even support a law to this affect.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I feel that part of the feeling behind the instrument is lost because of of people being miss-led

John from USA

Yes

No

Sad

Jonathan De Reuck from South Africa

No

No

Well I would not buy it if I sound out that I was being tricked. I would prefer a didge made by aboriginal people.

Jos Vandenbroeck from Belgium

No

No

Most of people know not enough concerning aboriginals and didgeridoo's

Jose Pablo Aguilar Vega from Costa Rica

Yes

No

It's so cool I love this instrument

Anonymous

No

No

Not good

Jr from USA

No

No

Do not agree with this practice.

Judy Echols from USA

Yes

No

It is a sad thing. More people should be aware of this. I talk to people about didjes and always mention these facts. I recommend you to people.

Anonymous

No

No

Glad to know

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Something should be done to guarantee authenticity

Kathy from Australia

Yes

No

All instruments should have the name of the maker and the year made. As with the Stradivarius violin some people labeled the instrument they made as a Strad - not meaning to deceive people but to indicate the model the design was based on. After 1891 the United States required imported goods to be identified with the maker the year and the town in which it was made and many times the country as well. This could work for the didgeridoo as well - Maker's name & race year made and in what town & country. Perhaps there can be a special marking that would be copyright for Aborigines only to use. Then if this is used by a non-Aboriginal legal action can be taken.

Kathy from USA

No

No

Same as above its terrible. I have a great respect for the Aboriginal people

Kathy from USA

No

No

I feel as I do about the native Americans of the US i.e. the indigenous people should be the only ones to capitalize on their own culture. It should always be clear who and how something was done.

Kazimierz from Netherlands

Yes

No

It so easy to use others influences paintings and so on. It's misleading for people who don't know.

Kelly Baste from USA

Yes

No

We as indian people have been given a number by the government called a certificate of indian blood (CIB#)this tells the people that by from us that is was made by a real native that brings us a little more money but the market is flooded by look alikes fakes that's only the half of the story then we get ripped off by the shop owners as well and the price still keeps dropping. its pretty sad.

Ken Rath from Denmark

Yes

No

I think that the cheaters should be prosecuted for false saying

Kenneth from USA

Yes

No

I still think there should be some labeling that can't be counterfeited.

Kevin from South Africa

Yes

No

This is unethical and amounts to forgery.

Kim Allen from USA

No

No

I think that their should be some kind of regulation against it--although enforcement might be quite a challenge. Perhaps I am wrong but I don't see any mention on your website of marking (with a trademarked insignia ) and numbering of individual didgeridoos. I know when I purchase other fine instruments there a signature of the maker--which you have--along with a number and sometimes a certificate of authenticity. In addition many items I purchase have some kind of guild "mark" which is proof of craftsmanship.

Anonymous

No

No

It doesn't seem fair at all

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Angry

Landon Hilde from Canada

No

No

Blasphemy

Lara from USA

No

No

Natives of any culture should be able to sell their works without competition from non-natives.

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

Not knowing enough about Aboriginal culture I cannot be specific. The main issue would be over representing the artwork as Aboriginal made. As long as the source is stated then I have not further opinion.

Anonymous

No

No

How can someone's culture be sold without permission or inclusion?

Leah Morgan from Canada

No

No

Only Aboriginals should be allowed to use their cultural images. If people want authentic Aboriginal Didjeridu's they should pay the Aboriginal people for them. Maybe some kind of registry would help with this situation? Only didjeridu's with the Authentic Stamp on them could be sold as Authentic? This is a difficult situation to find an easy solution for. I'm not educated enough about the situation to be of any real help.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

I'm deeply saddened by this hoarse reality!

Anonymous

No

No

Give a way of identifying originals

Len from USA

No

No

The facts should be known by the purchaser

Leon from United Kingdom

No

No

There is something special about the didgeridoo and only those who can feel the Spirit being in the presence of one or hearing one can appreciate sad to say again there is a huge element of bushiness that is making money out of this other than the very people that should ABORIGINAL PEOPLE.

Anonymous from Netherlands

Yes

No

It's like the Rubicks game in which the original inventor does not get any money... Rich people making even more money over the backs of other people...

Anonymous from Canada

Yes

No

That's business. Not good but that's the way it is.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

It's a shame

Lincoln Jensen from USA

Yes

No

People are untruthful that is a fact

Anonymous

No

No

It's not right.

Linda from USA

No

No

I feel that all the people are being deceived.

Lindsay Dyche from USA

Yes

No

I was misinformed when buying my didge and was pissed off!

Anonymous

No

No

Very wrong

Anonymous

Yes

No

Still sad but this happen with all kinds of tribal equipment all over the world! maybe the government should start to change this!!

Anonymous

Yes

No

Ok

Lorelei from USA

No

No

See above. It's horrible.

Anonymous from Mexico

No

No

Again I feel so sad with this.

Luke White from Australia

No

No

Makers of didgeridoos should have to state exactly how and by whom the didgeridoo was made. This should also extend to the artwork on all didgeridoos.

Manas Chowdhary from India

Yes

No

They should say it clearly weather the make is genuine aboriginal or not. this instrument is so basic sellers or makers shouldn't be so complicated that the make or paintings issue.

Marc from Spain

No

No

I don't like this didgeridoos because I prefer without images on it.

Marcia from USA

No

No

Aboriginal people should benefit from their art forms.

Anonymous

No

No

Not fair

Marilyn from New Zealand

Yes

No

I don't think it should be allowed unless it is clearly stated.

Mark from United Kingdom

Yes

No

I was duped into buying one of these as my first didge it was not till I really started research into the aboriginal people I realised. They even gave a fake certificate saying it was an aboriginal didge. It was not till I purchase my first didge from you that I found the difference in quality and sound I wanted.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

No

Again this is a very sad statistic. They should have some sort of copy right to protect people exploiting them.

Anonymous from Germany

No

No

It's almost criminal!

Anonymous from United Kingdom

Yes

No

These issues should be taken up with a court of law as this is fraud and any proceeds given to the aboriginal people.

Mary from USA

Yes

No

I'm very glad your site brought it to my attention. I'll be a far wiser shopper now and not spend my money at a dishonest vendor.

Matt from USA

No

No

It could be a good thing because it spreads knowledge of them and there culture.

Matthew from USA

Yes

No

In my opinion that is a a form of fraud. Also the fact that the people not of aboriginal ethnicity use images which are sacred to the Aboriginal people is almost like they are mocking the aboriginal culture. Granted there is not copyright on these images I think that people should have more respect for other peoples' cultures. It's like going into someone else's home. You don't just take off your coat and run to the refrigerator fix yourself a sandwich and sit back on the couch with your feet on the coffee table. That's just disrespectful.

Maureen from USA

No

No

Not pleased

Anonymous from Chile

Yes

No

As I said before I am not surprised about it. they are cheating the people that's not fair for anyone

Merv from USA

No

No

It's no different than counterfeit knock-offs and should be a prosecuting offence.

Michael from Japan

Yes

No

Does someone have a patent on the violin? Can I manufacture one and sell it? Aboriginal people should be the main benefactors from the sale of instruments art and all other items derived from their culture.

Michael from USA

No

No

Well it is something else that is going wrong with the world

Michael Gibbs from USA

Yes

No

I feel that when one buys a didj or anything for that matter that person has the right to know where how and by whom the didj was made.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Clarity and honesty are high values to me. While I think it appropriate for non-aboriginal didge lovers to construct didges they should always be clear.

Anonymous

No

No

Horrible

Anonymous

No

No

Really not right

Michelle from USA

No

No

Not right at all.

Miguel Lajas from Portugal

Yes

No

It's worrying because I think that when people buy a didgeridoo they are also buying a cultural icon and it should be a truly a genuine item even because if these things continue to happen people will think twice before buying anything.

Nancy from USA

No

No

It seems to me that type of advertising or marketing should be illegal

Nancy from USA

No

No

The government should take steps to protect the purity of this art!

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Terrible

Neil Wakeling from United Kingdom

No

No

I feel it should be law to state accurately the maker I would far rather purchase a n aboriginal-made instrument in the hope that it would directly benefit the community. I also feel it would likely be a far better didge.

Nejc from Slovenia

No

No

It's not really nice but what can we do!?

Niagara Cruz Vieira from Brazil

No

No

I think that is cheat

Nicholas Pottle from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Its about time something was done about it.

Nick from USA

No

No

Its very saddening

Anonymous

Yes

No

I think that only aboriginal people make and paint didj very well

Anonymous

Yes

No

The customer should not be told it was made by aboriginal people if it really wasn't. A customer should pay for what they get. It's logical that those images are used cuz it refers to it's origin.

Nigel from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Not good. I don't have a problem with non aboriginals making and selling didges but do have a problem with some who pretend the didges are made by aboriginals and the are not

Nuno from Portugal

Yes

No

I think is a kind of faking the true items of cultural background of the aboriginal people.

Olivier from France

No

No

A big lie added to others. Some people have stolen Aboriginal part of culture to make profit it is disgusting.

Oscar from Mexico

Yes

No

It is terrible there should be laws about this situation a painter song writers etc have rights and nobody can use the name or art work without being recognize it should be the same for the aboriginal work.

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

I think it is wise of your website to state these facts

Pat from Australia

Yes

No

Like I said their mongrels.

Patricia Schraier from USA

No

No

Should be corrected.

Patrick from USA

Yes

No

Control of didgeridoo art and manufacture should be tightly controlled with ALL royalties going to a fund to be controlled by Aboriginal leaders for the betterment and preservation of Aboriginal lands and holdings.

Anonymous

No

No

Regrettable but once again a fact of life in this day and age. There needs to be a clear way to identify the 'real deal'.

Anonymous

Yes

No

See above. In principle artwork should be available for all to create but the declaration issue hold of course!

Paul from USA

Yes

No

Aboriginal artwork is beautiful and worthy of emulation; however marketing and selling non-genuine products under the guise of being "genuine" is deceitful and lowers both the seller and our collective culture.

Peggy Adams from USA

Yes

No

Plagiarism

Peggylynn Terrien from USA

Yes

No

There should be laws and seals to tell the real thing from the fakes or really just stop the fakes

Peter from Sweden

Yes

No

It may be wrong to use symbols strongly connected so a certain culture that you do not belong but it is difficult to forbid. Instead you should work on strengthening the knowledge about differences between real and fake.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

No

The Aboriginal people need to make representations to their local member of parliament so that their ancestry is recognised and some form benefit is passed to the aboriginal people maybe in the form of a royalty

Petri from Finland

Yes

No

Yes to the first part but not sure 'bout the second one. To my opinion the circumstances usually are rather "not telling too much" than straightly deceiving customers.

Phil from USA

No

No

I am not at all surprised. Aboriginal people have lost so much and have been swept aside by a tidal wave of outsider people. The culture is important it is what makes each of us different and special in a world of increasing sameness and isolation from the earth.

Phil from France

Yes

No

Yet again it's a problem people no longer respect the fact that this ancestral musical instrument belongs to this day to the original creators the aboriginal people of australia

Anonymous from Germany

Yes

No

It's a shame and it's bad for both customers and the Aboriginal People

Anonymous

Yes

No

Saddened

Ray Higgins from Australia

Yes

No

A pity there was not a patent on the didge. might stop the rubbish. and the real didges and art work would flourish.

Anonymous

Yes

No

It makes me upset

René from Netherlands

Yes

No

If a didge is sold it has to be clearly that it is not an Aboriginal didge and a part of the money should go to aboriginals

Anonymous from Canada

No

No

Sad but not surprised

Richard from Belgium

Yes

No

It 's wrong but we are living in a commercial world where all that is not forbidden is allowed. Even if that is not wright.

Richard Kaiser from Italy

No

No

That there should be laws forcing sellers to clearly state this fact.

Anonymous from USA

No

No

Very unfair - no recourse?

Richard from USA

No

No

The aboriginal people are hurt

Richard from United Kingdom

No

No

The Australian government should legislate to protect Aboriginal interest.

Rick Malone from USA

Yes

No

It is a sad deception that the world accepts. People purchase Aboriginal art simply to have it. Whether or not it is real is not important.

Rick Whelan from Australia

Yes

No

I think that the union jack on the australian flag should be replaced with the skull and crossbones because we are a nation of pirates! We have stolen everything.

Robert from USA

No

No

Painted Didgeridoos should not have Aboriginal symbols on them if they are not crafted by Aboriginals. It's deceptive dishonest and violates truth in advertising ethics.

Robert from USA

Yes

No

I disagree with the fraud

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

Bah

Robert from USA

Yes

No

Hopefully serious collectors will pay attention to the facts as you point them out.

Robert from United Kingdom

Yes

No

Shameful!

Anonymous from Sweden

Yes

No

These people who sell these fakes don't understand what kind of problem they make for the Aboriginal people who had lived in peace until the white man came across their land and since then suffered from alcoholism to different kinds of diseases. It makes me sad and angry!

Roger from United Kingdom

No

No

Deception is always wrong

Rolf from United Kingdom

Yes

No

I put 'yes' here because it is clear you never see an advert for didgeridoos without an idealised picture of an Aboriginal person or the culture. Again the exploiters are using the idealistic image to sell what is not their own and obviously to create personal profit.

Ron from USA

No

No

I have mixed feelings. On the one hand the "counterfeiters" expose more people to the aboriginal art forms but on the other hand they need to present the art truthfully.

Anonymous from Canada

No

No

Didn't know that fact.

Anonymous from Spain

No

No

It's not like that here at this shop...the owners do not mention where they get it from....Also these shops in Spain where you can find a didj are not properly specialized and they sell Didjes as they sell many other "exotic" stuff (bongos rain-sticks...marihuana and other hippy merchandising

Anonymous

Yes

No

I am from Canada and our Native Art is often commercialised and stolen the same way.

Anonymous

No

No

Not right

Sabine from Netherlands

No

No

I think that people should be made aware of it.

Sally Ann Bryant from USA

No

No

Aboriginal people should have the opportunity to place a marker on each piece sold and state the makers. They should receive a profit from all sold...

Sally from USA

No

No

I think its disgusting!

Samuel from France

Yes

No

I try to find real stores like Didjshop!!!

Sandy from USA

No

No

That's extremely unfortunate and unfair. Clearly the Aboriginal people are being exploited abused and under appreciated.

Anonymous

No

No

It would be nice to know the facts upfront

Anonymous from Finland

Yes

No

Its all very wrong!

Scot Glackman from USA

No

No

Deception is never okay especially when cashing in on a culture that brought you the object. THinking of visiting tourists many of them just want an Australian souvenir to put on their wall. Too bad money can't go to the Aboriginal people.

Anonymous

No

No

I guess it comes down to what is being sold the physical instrument or a "culture" of manufacture. In the end we should give credit to where credit is due. Does the name "didgeridoo" imply that it is made by Aboriginal people or does it merely describe a type of musical instrument?

Scott from USA

No

No

Too bad it is not widely known that this is occurring

Scott from USA

Yes

No

It's sad that others feel compelled to take advantage of others for the sheer sake of making money.

Anonymous

No

No

This is a dishonest practice.

Simon Ashby from United Kingdom

Yes

No

All of my didges are undecorated and I will wait until I know enough or have met the right people to decide if they are to respectfully decorated.

Stan from USA

No

No

I have seen bamboo didges decorated like the real ones. For art I guess it's OK. We even purchased a nice looking didge but is it is very difficult to play

Stane Andolsek from Slovenia

No

No

Aboriginal people could organize to sell didgeridoos by themselves or to connect with the people which respect their culture and the original work of them not to lie customers.

Anonymous

No

No

It is a crime

Steve from USA

No

No

I think that its deceitful and not a good way to do business and furthermore the Aboriginal people deserve their due credit for such a wonderful instrument

Sue from Canada

No

No

It's not right

Anonymous from USA

Yes

No

Native instruments should be sold and constructed by natives=if the products are not native that MUST be included in the advertisement

Susan from USA

No

No

I think it's outrageous!

Anonymous

No

No

Surprised

Szabolcs Nemeth from Hungary

Yes

No

Must stop! respect the didjeridu!!!

Tammy from USA

No

No

I believe in people's rights to produce and sell didgeridoos but only true aboriginal didgeridoos should be sold as such. If someone is selling a farce it should be public knowledge.

Anonymous

No

No

See above education comment.

Anonymous

No

No

I know little about Aboriginal culture but I do know that the paintings aren't just pretty dot patterns. They tell a story. Passed from one generation to another.

Anonymous

No

No

Terrible

Tero from Finland

Yes

No

It's a big problem and a form of cultural piracy. It sucks when the officials don't do anything to this kind of blatant forgery although they have strict anti-piracy laws against other forged goods. Why should Lacoste or Nike have any better protection for their product than aborigines? I made this point extremely clear to my brother who spent last summer in Australia as an exchange student. Happily the message got through and as a souvenir I got a rain stick with an original dot painting while my nephew got a boomerang also with original art. As an added bonus he bought himself a didgeridoo from the same artist and is now practicing to play it:D

Terry from USA

No

No

I believe that everyone should be truthful.

Theresa from USA

Yes

No

Same as above. It is similar to robber but it is really worse since it is robbing a culture.

Theresa from South Africa

Yes

No

The ideal would be that aboriginal art/symbols should be copyrighted & that didjes should be sold with a certificate of authenticity.(Would be difficult to police that one!). Unfortunately you cannot trust that people will be honest.

Thomas from Canada

No

No

When you make an imitation or a copy in the style of the original without presenting it as such it's dishonest. Declaring that something is authentic when it isn't is even worse.

Tiago from Portugal

Yes

No

Aboriginal art and culture should be res

Anonymous

No

No

That's not right

Tina Johnston from Australia

Yes

No

There should be some way of preventing this.

Anonymous

Yes

No

I feel this is a fraudulent use of cultural icons and should be prosecuted as such.

Tom Gibson from United Kingdom

Yes

No

It shouldn't be done Its fraudulent so I'm dislike that fact that it is done.

Tom from USA

No

No

See above

Toni from USA

No

No

Lying by omission implication or outright deception creates crappy karma. It's a shame that this occurs.

Tony Kiser from USA

No

No

There should be laws in effect to certify authenticity of the didj

Tracey from USA

No

No

You can't trust anyone

Trey Sansom from USA

Yes

No

It is wrong to misrepresent any product and it is a very unfortunate practice that hurts an entire culture.

Vedran Katušić from Croatia/Hrvatska

No

No

I can be angry very easily but know my ways to control my lion instinct at anger because I had woman's love to show me the way..........ill dedicate 1 aspect of life to change things to the real truth around my surrounding.have nothing more to say.

Vicki from USA

No

No

This is wrong

Vickie Mccoy from USA

No

No

Again that seems wrong and unfair to real Aboriginal artists.

Vickie from USA

No

No

Not right.

Anonymous

No

No

I think they should ask.

William Causey from USA

Yes

No

Mad

Anonymous from USA

No

No

They should be corrected

Yerai Oliveras from Puerto Rico

Yes

No

Australian law should punish these liars.

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Check out other selections of our visitors' comments:

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

 

If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

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