Didgeridoo enthusiasts love Didjshop.com!
Where you can listen to your didgeridoo before you buy

Did you know that well over 90% of all didgeridoos sold are not made by Aboriginal people,
nor is any money from those sales returned to Aboriginal people?

On this page you can read the answers our visitors gave to this question as part of our yearly visitor surveys, where you can win great prizes.
(we post comments only if permission was given)

Over the years we have asked our visitors many different questions and any of the below topics contain hundreds of comments from people all over the world. Enjoy reading what other people have to say on those subjects:-). If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Name and Country

Did you know that fact?

What do you think or feel about the fact that well over 90% of all didgeridoos sold are not made by Aboriginal people, nor is any money from those sales returned to Aboriginal people?

Aaron from Canada

No

It sucks.

Aaron from Germany

No

I had no idea that the percentage was so high. It seems to me that anybody in the world should be allowed to make a Didj but that they should be clearly labeled where the material comes from and who manufactured it. This is already being done with the auto industry in the USA. Would you want to buy a BMW built in China? Knowing that a Didj was harvested and made by an Aboriginal person adds value and authenticity to the instrument. It also make you feel good that your supporting this group of people.

Anonymous

No

It is sad to know that many buyers are being ripped off without even realizing it. I'm sure that some non-Aboriginal made didgeridoos are of a good high quality and made with the highest level of knowledge and care but I think for the most part they are cheap and mass produced. I do not feel however that Aboriginal people are in any way entitled to any portion of other people's sales. That would be like saying that the rest of the world owes a portion of their automobile sales to the U.S. because the automobile was an American invention.

Alain Di Carlo from Italy

No

In this world there is always who is prepared to damage the next one for his/her own profit.

Albert Russell from USA

No

On one side of the coin any amount of didgeridoos made and brought into the world expands the listening for them. on the other side it is to bad that the Aboriginal people do not partake in their value.

Alexandre from Portugal

No

It is sad to know that the original aboriginal culture is being destroyed by all the low quality imitation didgeridoos paintings etc... This ancestral cultural should be defended and maintain its pure state

Anonymous from Canada

No

Terrible

Anonymous from USA

No

Unfortunate

Anonymous from USA

No

Doesn't seem right its a part of their culture and if they are being reproduced for monetary gain at a plant or company then the whole history of the instruments is lost.

Anonymous

No

It saddens me because it destroys the forest and the Aboriginal people's environment.

Anonymous

No

Good idea

Angel Cabrera Rodriguez from Spain

No

It is a shame! I do not understand this lack of ethics.

Anonymous

No

Sad

Anonymous from USA

No

Very unfair

Anthony Plakias from Australia

No

This is not good at all. Money should go to the families that need it for basic needs. White man is greedy with both land and money as it also does not respect the true land owners.

Anonymous from USA

No

I think that's terrible. Honestly this is a beautiful instrument that deserves to have it's original makers recognized. I also believe that the money should go to the Aboriginal people as they do deserve the money for THEIR work.

Anonymous

No

Mixed some other cultures may be earnest in their sales and genuinely selling to live the aboriginal people should be entitled to some royalties and rights

Anonymous

No

Like it

Barbara from Australia

No

It is not fair. Unfortunately local history attracts tourists to our country but tourists would often pay for cheaper un-authentic items without knowing the difference.

Barbara from USA

No

I did not know the percentage was that high and I think it is very important to support the Aboriginal people.

Barry Shrimpton from New Zealand

No

Annoyed.

Bart Vrancken from Netherlands

No

It's absolutely unacceptable.

Benjamin from USA

No

That sounds like theft to me. The Aboriginal people should be compensated according to sales.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

This needs to be changed!

Beth from USA

No

Its a shame

Anonymous from USA

No

Seems unfair.

Anonymous from USA

No

I feel that it is morally wrong to steal a piece of the Aboriginal culture and then not even consider the fact that it is rightfully theirs.

Billy from USA

No

I think that it's great!

Blaine from Canada

No

It is unfortunate

Anonymous from USA

No

They should be labeled as facsimiles.

Brad Lackey from USA

No

Sadly it is inevitable. Cheap copies are available for all products.

Brad Olson from USA

No

I feel we we should give back to were the art of the didge really came from. Not to change their culture but to assist in culture strength.

Anonymous from USA

No

Great

Anonymous from USA

No

I feel that the Aboriginal people should benefit in some way or form. Since it is their art.

Anonymous

No

Sad

Anonymous from USA

No

It is unfair

Anonymous from Australia

No

I think that it is unjust and disrespectful

Bruno from Australia

No

Disgusting

Carla from United Kingdom

No

Seems a shame that aboriginal people don't get any sales from didgeridoos

Anonymous

No

Governmental intervention required to secure authenticity and genuineness of all aboriginal art. This statistic is absurd!!!

Carol from USA

No

I'm surprised but perhaps those artists love and respect the art form and the people and really meant to help them.

Carole from USA

No

No

Cass from USA

No

I do not like this fact

Catherine from USA

No

That is exploiting people. They should earn a proceed

Chad from Canada

No

I feel that although any presence of a didgeridoo helps change the world nobody can deny the absolute necessity of respect and fairtrade to the original artists and owners.

Chalton Monteiro from Brazil

No

That is cruel and selfish.

Charlie from USA

No

It is pretty sad that less than 90% of all didgeridoos are not made by Aboriginal people. However the only way I feel it is possible to know for sure I'm buying a native instrument is to buy one in Australia from a native artist.

Anonymous from Australia

No

I think it is very unfair.

Chris Scott from United Kingdom

No

I think that the cutting of trees for didgeridoos on aboriginal land by non aboriginal people is wrong and needs to be stopped.

Anonymous

No

I think that the didgeridoo is a musical instrument and as such anyone who can make one should be allowed to. The quality of the product should set the market not a law.

Christopher Benbow from United Kingdom

No

It's a same as it is an aboriginal instrument

Christopher from Australia

No

Its upsetting to see Australian people getting ripped of for their art. Something as creative and personal as a didge shouldn't be made by a machine. Or a person making the instrument that doesn't appreciate the Aboriginal culture

Anonymous

No

I think that sucks. I think that money from the sales should go towards the Aboriginal people.

Cierra from USA

No

It wrong an that just means more people are stealing from an ancient culture that's rich with history. Aboriginal people have a lot to teach us an all we can do in return is steal there means an not give them a share. We should at least give them that much (money) for sharing the didjeridu with us all if not money at least give Aboriginals something in return so its a fair exchange and it will make them feel more appreciated as well.

Cindy from USA

No

I think that this practice should be stopped. It is fraud

Clarence from USA

No

I think it sucks but that's the way the world is today

Clark Berryman from Canada

No

I think its another example of a people's culture being appropriated by a dominating colonial power.

Claude Beauaire from Canada

No

I'm outraged!

Claudio from Chile

No

I think and feel in the place of those who is the true owners of the root of the instrument and it simultaneously seems to me an abuse and a robbery. this profiting with which he is other people's

Anonymous from USA

No

I think that the Aboriginal people are being robed of their culture through the sale non-Aboriginal Didjeridoos.

Anonymous

No

Its amazing

Connie from USA

No

It's sad but no surprising

Craig from Canada

No

That is why I extensively researched as many suppliers as I could and after almost four years of checking into every available supplier I decided to purchase my first true didgeridoo from your company. Your business ethics and treatment of your indigenous people/suppliers are exactly what I was looking for.

Anonymous

No

I feel that it is very sad.

Dale from USA

No

It appalling. We need to do everything we can to protect indigenous culture around the world. They are our only means of survival for the future.

Dan Desmarais from Canada

No

I have seen many cases of stolen culture for the sake of making money. I makes me feel ill. I find it very shameful.

Dan Snell from USA

No

I feel it is some what wrong but not entirely because if you look at other instruments that certain cultures created they are not getting money from sales made on that instrument

Dane from Australia

No

Makes me wild. It is an Aboriginal Instrument that is also being sold as an Aboriginal Instrument but fake ones has nothing to do with Aboriginal people.

Anonymous

No

Any inferior quality products then looks bad on the Aboriginal people who were not involved in their production nor did they receive income from the product.

Darin Petersen from USA

No

It bothers me when people use something that indigenous cultures have created with out do respect or credit.

Darlene Demos from USA

No

Yes I knew this because I read your news letters which keep me informed!! I think that no matter what it is that is for sale people try to get in on the action. It's human nature. If something is not original however it should certainly be marked so the consumer knows exactly what they are purchasing. The consumer is then in control of their expenditures and able to make an informed decision.

Darrel Haltmann from South Africa

No

Its a rip off

Anonymous

No

Not good

Darren from Australia

No

I think it would be fair that a certain percentage of a sale should be put back into the culture.

Dave from USA

No

I think it is very sad that other countries infringe on another country culture for gain and profit.

Anonymous

No

Doesn't seem right

David from USA

No

I think its ok unless its all happening near the Arnhem delta. Everyone has a right to survive. That would be lik e asking for all moneys from the banjo to be sent to Uganda to pay the original people that made them.

Anonymous

No

That's horrible

David from Canada

No

I have mixed feelings on this fact. -Modern craftsmen can bring this instrument forward to new heights. Presenting amazing variations on an ancient instrument. -Traditional instruments made by aboriginal people offer spirit and history to the instrument. -However I do not approve of the mock traditional instrument.

David from Germany

No

If the quality is the same then this is o.k.. However it is always nicer to have an original.

David Ponicki from USA

No

A rip off of the aboriginals

Deb from USA

No

On the surface it appears to be unfair...

Anonymous

No

Not sure. I don't think any other culture specifically makes money off of the sale of instruments originating from those areas i.e. flutes violins drums etc..

Anonymous

No

Very interesting

Diana from USA

No

Its terrible as it with all cultures.it is not a fair world.

Anonymous

No

Many people make different countries' things

Diane from USA

No

I feel that if the person selling the Didgeridoo can afford to and if there is a place to send the money they should do so.

Anonymous

No

Totally ridiculous

Anonymous from USA

No

Cool

Donald from Australia

No

Terrible

Drew from USA

No

I will only buy a termite hollowed authentic didgeridoo.

Anonymous from Netherlands

No

Horrible

Edward from USA

No

It is not good.

Elisha Manthis from USA

No

I believe its quite horrible- making instruments is a huge part of any culture and when this vital aspect of a culture becomes taken over by outsiders it becomes all the more insignificant and a part of their history and way of life is lost forever. it is very important to me that these pieces of art are carefully handcrafted by the peoples who have hand crafted them for centuries.

Ellen Lopes from USA

No

It makes me uncomfortable knowing that some people buying didgeridoos might not know this and that those that do know don't care.

Eostar from USA

No

I think that didjeridoos belong to humanity.

Eric Andries from Belgium

No

I think this is wrong. Didgeridoos has to be made by Aboriginal people so they heave al the benefits of it when sold.

Eric from USA

No

I think that is totally bogus! it is like we are stealing their culture and getting rich off of it. frankly it makes me sick that third world countries can't even make a buck!

Eric Frisbee from USA

No

I think its sad that cultures all over the world are being reduced to nothing because of the word "money". We should all learn to respect all cultures and if that culture chooses to share their history and way of life or culture with the world it should be respected. If not then it is truly sacred to them and we should mind our own business and show respect.

Anonymous from Colombia

No

I think that everyone is able to make a didgeridoo even for sale it. What's really important to take in account is the original nature of the instrument so that its music value won't be modified. And in most of the cases who can build a better didge than aboriginal people? Mainly the aboriginal handcraft can preserve better the didge's nature.

Anonymous

No

I think it is wrong it is as bad as a poacher

Frances from USA

No

Sad. But so typical of any indigenous peoples' fate culture and arts.

Anonymous

No

I think the money are the bad think for the unman and the human don't understand this is normal for the company no give you the money.

Frederick Ashplant from USA

No

To me this is an example of fraud and an outrage

Gabrielle Littlefield from Australia

No

Another sad injustice relating to the theft of cultural capital from indigenous people being perpetrated without any penalty to those doing such illegal activity

Garry from Australia

No

I wouldn't buy a non aboriginal didj. It's like buying a fake. If all so called Aboriginal products sold delivered royalties to the Aboriginals they would be more self sufficient happier people and able to afford social infrastructure.

Gary from USA

No

For a Didj to be called a Didj it should be from Aboriginal origin from start to finish.

Gary Cooper from USA

No

I'm a sculptor 1st a painter 2nd. So of course I have a strong feeling against this. Just as the American Indian has had so many opportunist take advantage of their art culture to prostitute it and make millions of dollars from their inheritance. Man can be a greedy animal. This is disgusting how one may look to use another's creation to reap the spoils from. If someone were to take one of my pieces of art and manufacture it I would feel raped of my work. Sincerely. Gary Cooper

Gary from USA

No

That sucks

Gavin Bamber from Canada

No

Amazed

Anonymous from Germany

No

I am feeling bad as I do not know where my didges come from. I think this is wrong and Aborigines should be supported more

George Walsh from USA

No

Serious problem. Other Didj aren't authentic and is an economic tragedy to aboriginal peoples.

Gerrit Lacroix from Netherlands

No

I personally think that although we all try to make a living this is not a good thing. for didges and didge playing are in fact aboriginal. so copyright and other such things should be looks at closely.

Anonymous

No

I would like to know which ones are made by the Aboriginal people

Graeme from United Kingdom

No

Poor; give the right people their right to preserve their heritage /culture!!

Grant from United Kingdom

No

Terrible

Anonymous

No

I think it's a disgrace

Gregg Nardozza from USA

No

A complete shame. So many people out there are selling non-aboriginal didjes and some vendors even lie about their origin.

Gregory Ling from USA

No

I feel the aboriginal people should be honored and respected. Anytime a culture is exploited by conscious intent there is no integrity. Without integrity there is no love. Love is what heals. The products made by these people lower the vibration of humanity.

Anonymous from Italy

No

I recon everybody can make didjeridoos because everybody has the right to do it we should only write on the didjeridoos targets its features as wood builder artist..

Anonymous from Mexico

No

Lets give the chance to participate to the aboriginal people they have great ideas and great culture

Henry Saavedra from Japan

No

Proceeds of sales should be put aside or set up for a foundation to help support the aboriginal community but something definitely has to be done.

Herb Cohen from USA

No

I think its shameful.

Hillel from Australia

No

I had an idea that it was many but didn't realize it was this high. Competition for everything is great so through educating people of the importance of supporting aboriginal arts hopefully this figure (of non aboriginal didges selling) will decrease.

Anonymous from USA

No

That's crazy

Iain Tidmarsh from United Kingdom

No

Very saddened

Anonymous

No

It is not always easy to obtain Didjes from Aboriginal source cheaply when you start out.

Ilian Ninov from Bulgaria

No

I think that real Aboriginal is a man of knowledge a man who is very near to the mother earth and this is something which will make him survive under any circumstances. Maybe we are the people which must thing about how do we feel and thing in our concrete jungle.

Irene from Macedonia (FYR)

No

Just like any other instrument the violin for instance emerged in Italy latter to spread all over the world so does the Didge.The only bad thing about this is that the Aboriginal people can't gain more. Eventually sooner or later everything turns into a profit.Sad isn't it?

Jack from USA

No

This is not good.

Jack Whelan from USA

No

Not too good but it's typical

Jackie from USA

No

As with any instrument I believe that anybody has the right to make them. Didgeridoo-type instruments are not the sole creation of Australian Aboriginal people... the Bronze Age Irish Horn is one example. Money from sales of instruments rightfully belongs to the legal seller.

James from USA

No

Its not right--this needs to be protected by AU govt

James Hoege from USA

No

I feel this is wrong

James Lewis from United Kingdom

No

I feel that only didgeridoo's made by aboriginals should result in them getting money for them. Whoever makes the didgeridoos should get the money. I however wish that there were more didgeridoos made by aboriginals.

James Whiteford from United Kingdom

No

The law should be changed so if someone outside the community sells anything they say is aboriginal they at least should pay a levy which should be distributed amongst all the communities within the aboriginal culture.

Anonymous

No

That is disgusting

Anonymous

No

Its not right

Javier from Spain

No

Estaría bien q se hicieran todos así. Porque esto favorecería más a los ingresos de esta gente

Anonymous from USA

No

I want the original makers to profit not fakes

Jean from USA

No

I feel that it's outrageous...and sad. (Somewhat akin to how I feel about all the US manufacturing jobs being outsourced to China etc. all in the name of the Mighty Dollar for cheap labor.) In the case of didgeridoos (and boomerangs?!) people who are made aware of this should make an extra effort to purchase only didgeridoos made by Aboriginal people so that they will reap some benefit from their native instrument and also to help strengthen and maintain their culture in this regard.

Jean from USA

No

It is sad it is nice when products are marked that when purchased the sale will help a certain group of people.

Anonymous

No

I feel that the aboriginals should at least get 60% of the sale

Jeffrey Levine from USA

No

The aboriginal people must persevere to dominate the field of didge-making of the highest quality as only they have perfected it over the millennia. There needs to be much more exposure of their plight and their instrument throughout the world's media. The didgeridoo needs to be heard and appreciated through documentary presentations on our educational channels. Every aspect of the use and meanings of the various tribal styles of playing should be explained and exposed to the minds of caring and interested non-aboriginal populations around the world. All "real" didges should be stamped and a portion of each sale should go to the tribes.

Jennifer from Australia

No

I did know that a lot of 'fakes' as such are sold but did not realise over 90%! I find this incredibly serious and something needs to be done to police this more!

Jennifer White from Canada

No

I happen to own a bamboo didj because it was affordable ($20.00)and readily available in my small town. It was my introduction to didjing and now I love it and want a true Aboriginal termite-hollowed one. SO in a weird way if it wasn't for the non-aboriginal market I might not have got "hooked". Also my ancestor is Celtic but my cells molecules and DNA have been shared by All-who-have-gone-before me. We can All meet in Dreamtime.

Jennifer from USA

No

I didn't know that.

Anonymous

No

I was unaware of this

Jeremy from USA

No

I think it's absurd. The aboriginal people should be making and reaping the reward of that creation.

Jerry from USA

No

Sucks

Jerry from USA

No

Indigenous people of australia are due a financial percentage of every didgeridoo sold in australia especially since they are responsible for the instrument's origin.

Anonymous

No

I think it slightly fair since it is on land they have claim too. Considering that I've no information upon the problems in this cultural area though my opinion is limited.

Jessanna from USA

No

That is very upsetting!

Jessica from USA

No

It's sad

Jim from USA

No

If someone wants to replicate - and sell for profit - an Aboriginal art piece they obviously must first obtain permission and then pay a royalty for each sale. However if someone wants to make their own original didj and sell it for a profit I see no need for paying royalties (provided they didn't copy any designs or images exactly).

Jim from USA

No

Mortified and disgusted

Jim Davis from Canada

No

I feel this is not good as many people try to take advantage of sell what they sometime mislead as an Aboriginal item.

Anonymous from USA

No

I'd rather have one from the Aboriginal people personally and that way they would be compensated.

Jim Wegner from USA

No

Not surprising.

Anonymous from Czech Republic

No

Well For me Didgeridoo is a musical instrument in the first place so if it's well-crafted and everything I really don't mind if it isn't made by Aboriginal people. But I see it carries very specific and ancient tradition so I'm glad if I see authentic aboriginal didgeridoo though it helps spreading the word. And about the money I'm not sure if didgeridoo is anything like copyrighted. Djembes are made all over the world and nobody gives money to People of Guinea. I'm pretty sure there are other way of getting some money...

Joe from USA

No

They should band together and create their own authentic outlet

Johan Thaens from Belgium

No

It's a sad sad thing and we can only fight this by spreading the news and take our own responsibility one by one.

John Blanchard from USA

No

The Aboriginal people need to make more didgeridoos.

John from USA

No

I think it an abhorable situation but it is a hard fact to deal with in a free market society. The best way to deal with the problem is with increased education and I would support forcing some sort or required labeling to state how and where the didge is made.

Anonymous from USA

No

It bothers me because I know the struggle that the aboriginal people have gone through and they have greater meaning behind the didj and the way life was created.

John from USA

No

Sad

Jonathan De Reuck from South Africa

No

I think it is a shame.

Jos Vandenbroeck from Belgium

No

The aboriginals to be the original makers and players of de didgeridoo and that must remain this way!

Jose Pablo Aguilar Vega from Costa Rica

No

Is fine

Anonymous

No

Sad

Jr from USA

No

Do not agree with this practice

Judy Echols from USA

No

I have played other people's didjes that were so bad that they were not worth playing. I would only buy a non-aboriginal didj if it were not a traditional type of didj for example a glass or metal didj. I also think that it is important to support the aboriginal people by buying from them and I feel that some of the methods of cutting trees used by other didj makers will do harm to the supply of trees in australia. I also know that when I buy from you you will be there should I need help with a didj that has gotten damaged and that you help me to find the right didj for what I want to play.

Anonymous

No

Great

Anonymous from USA

No

Why would you want one of those?

Kathy from Australia

No

I think that it is wonderful that other people groups have learnt the skill of didgeridoo making - it keeps the art alive! I believe that the revenue belongs to the person who crafted the instrument - more than likely they paid money to learn the craft. They obviously make didgeridoos because they love the instrument! Some Aboriginals paint using other styles and images from other cultures - should / do they pay royalties?

Kathy from USA

No

I think it would be a rip-off on both parties.

Kathy from USA

No

I have mixed feelings---if they are made from wood and person of another country it bothers me less than the people who in ANY way capitalize on the aboriginal makers woods country etc.

Kazimierz from Netherlands

No

It's not right because of the Aboriginal people we can play the didge. We have to pay them back with money and respect. Not exploit their culture

Kelly Baste from USA

No

I know how you aborigines feel my tribe is american indian I am a Navajo we to have copies of art work made by other countries as well that hurts all people of all different tribes here and around the world. it don't hurt me to say THIS HAS TO STOP but it never will just keep up the good work some day ill owen my own Didgeridoo from your tribe not from a pvc pipe.

Ken Rath from Denmark

No

Its a shame that people (tourists) are unaware of the fact that they era taken by the nose and that some people are making money on others behalf

Kenneth from USA

No

I think some kind of labeling should be required so you know what you are getting.

Kevin from South Africa

No

Not all of us from around the world have access to authentic aboriginal didjes - until we discovered this site that is. In Australia certainly at least a portion of the benefits of the sale of traditional instruments should go to the Aboriginal people -

Kim Allen from USA

No

That's very disappointing! I would rather have the profits go to a native (Aboriginal person).

Anonymous

No

It doesn't seem fair at all

Anonymous from USA

No

Sad

Landon Hilde from Canada

No

I think it's stupid and the aboriginal peoples should get some cut in profit

Lara from USA

No

That's horrible. That's what I think.

Anonymous from USA

No

Depends on the materials especially for artificial didjes I see no problem. Mass production harvesting I find a large problem since they are not sustainable.

Anonymous

No

Seems very wrong to me.

Leah Morgan from Canada

No

I think if the material/wood is coming from Aboriginal land then they are entitled to money for their wood. If they don't want their wood or didjeridu's sold then the rest of the world needs to respect that.

Anonymous from USA

No

I'm outraged!

Anonymous

No

Doesn't seem fair. There should be at least some kind of royalties involved.

Len from USA

No

If the wood the didgeridoo is made from comes from australia then the aboriginal people should receive compensation

Leon from United Kingdom

No

Very sad but what do you expect from a world that is becoming selfish greedy but to name a few.

Anonymous from Netherlands

No

Obviously it sucks.

Anonymous from Canada

No

It's like many other products. There are always imposters. Not good buy the real thing.

Anonymous from USA

No

It's a shame

Lincoln Jensen from USA

No

I surely would like an aboriginal didge but it is hard to tell if it is

Anonymous

No

I think that all items should be marked where and by whom they are manufactured. Nothing should be marked as 'original' or 'authentic' unless it is indeed so.

Linda from USA

No

I think it is so sad

Lindsay Dyche from USA

No

I believe to have in your didge spirit and good energy it needs to be 100% aboriginal

Anonymous

No

Its not right

Anonymous

No

This is where it starts how can it not go back to them!

Anonymous

No

Ok

Lorelei from USA

No

That it is very unfortunate and happy there is a site & people such as yourselves set up to ensure a reputable group is available to purchase from. Stealing from the poor/not supporting those who could greatly benefit & more then deserve it for their hard work is horrible. That's why I & my boyfriend will only buy from your site.. though its taking me a bit longer to save up then if I went elsewhere. But that isn't even a factor to me. I'm happy to support quality work.

Anonymous from Mexico

No

I feel so sad.

Luke White from Australia

No

Although it would be hard to regulate I feel that the Aboriginal people should receive a percentage of the money made from didgeridoo sales as they were the original creators of the magical instrument. This money would help to ensure the tradition of making authentic didgeridoos will no tbe lost.

Manas Chowdhary from India

No

I knew that all the didgeridoo sold r not made by the aboriginals.but the 90% is something really to think about.

Marc from Spain

No

Is a poor action in front of this actual society that only want to do do more money and don't think for important people who are very important in this case

Marcia from USA

No

I'm not surprised to hear it but it seems very unfair.

Anonymous

No

That's terrible

Marilyn from New Zealand

No

I think it is done for commercial reasons and should be banned unless it is clearly stated.

Mark from United Kingdom

No

I think it is truly awful and more people should be made aware of.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

I feel this is very sad. I believe a proportion of the profits of all instruments sold should go back to the aboriginal people

Anonymous from Germany

No

In my opinion it's sad because the people which should earn money for making this instruments doesn't and also the soul of the Didje can't be the same if a stranger produces it as it is if one of the native people does it! You also need love and appreciation for doing something.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

This is a aboriginal patent and so I think that whether it was made by them or not that a certain amount should be paid to the aboriginal people.

Mary from USA

No

I didn't know it until I read it on your site. I agree with what you wrote.

Matt from USA

No

I think they should get something from the sales of didgeridoos or something from the government

Matthew from USA

No

That is pretty sad. Considering the fact that the didgeridoo is a sacred instrument of the Aboriginal people I think that more recognition should be given to those people. Also I don't think that enough people know the origins or the significance of the didgeridoo to the Aboriginal people.

Maureen from USA

No

Pleased

Anonymous from Chile

No

Well I think is something very common I am not really surprised about this.

Merv from USA

No

It comes down to educating the public about didgeridoos and authenticity.

Michael from Japan

No

Actually I thought the aboriginal people I met in Tjapukai sold authentic Didgeridoos. And I now question the authenticity of sticks I purchase on the internet. Of course exploitation is not acceptable. [OUR COMMENT: Tjapukai actually sourced many didjes from non-Aboriginal makers]

Michael from USA

No

Unfortunate

Michael Gibbs from USA

No

I do not feel anything against non-Aboriginal people making didgeridoos. Hopefully these Didjes would be made in a respectful way.

Anonymous from USA

No

I have mixed feelings. I think there are some excellent thoughtful non-aboriginal craftspeople who have as much right to consciously craft a didge as do its original peoples. I do think that folks making a living from didge-making should probably tithe some of their earnings back to the Aboriginal community. I think any mass production of didges is not in keeping with the essence of the instrument...

Anonymous

No

Cool!

Anonymous

No

Its unfair

Michelle from USA

No

Amazed

Miguel Lajas from Portugal

No

In my opinion it's bad because these people are using the aboriginal culture without even helping the aboriginal people to maintain their traditions by giving them some of that money. I don't like when people do this because this is the same way that many other native cultures were extinct. As we know in history there were a lot of examples in which the natives were used by the white-men and later on also destroyed by him. So concluding I think that nowadays the governments should help the remaining cultures protecting them with laws or anything that can help them to remain active.

Nancy from USA

No

It is unfair to the Aboriginal people to use them for ones own benefit

Nancy from USA

No

Doesn't seem fair

Anonymous from USA

No

I would prefer that the Aboriginal people both made them and profited from the sales of them

Neil Wakeling from United Kingdom

No

I'm a tad shocked. Mine was bought directly from the maker.

Nejc from Slovenia

No

It's really hard to find real didgeridoo but I started with commercial didgeridoo because native were not cheap enough.

Niagara Cruz Vieira from Brazil

No

Very Bad

Nicholas Pottle from United Kingdom

No

Should be stopped

Nick from USA

No

The money should go to help preserve and protect the native cultures

Anonymous

No

I think that aboriginal people must made didj because it's the tradition

Anonymous

No

A percentage of the money earned from those sales should be given to the aboriginal people in order to help them and thank them for giving us such a great instrument for life.

Nigel from United Kingdom

No

I feel its good to support aboriginal artists when possible as it was them that gave us the instrument in the beginning

Nuno from Portugal

No

Didgeridoos are a part of the historical and cultural background of the aboriginal people so they should have the exclusivity of the construction and commercialisation.

Olivier from France

No

It is a shame! Only Aboriginal people (or a people recognized by Aboriginals) can tell they make genuine didgeridoos. Ideally a large part of money should be returned to Aboriginal people as they continue to make their culture proudly alive.

Oscar from Mexico

No

Is really sad because they just not steal the money on top on that they not recognize their work.

Anonymous from USA

No

It is very interesting to know

Pat from Australia

No

Their mongrels but all over the world people try to "cash" in on anything. You always have to be wary of what you're buying & look at labels and quality of items.

Patricia Schraier from USA

No

Another culture rip off.

Patrick from USA

No

This is a terrible injustice that should have been corrected years ago by law.

Anonymous

No

Welcome to the global economy!

Anonymous

No

On the one hand it's a part of modern life that all kind of things instruments artwork etc is made by many different people all over the world and that in principle is a good thing. On the other hand buyers should see where / who has made the instrument and then decide if they want the real thing. There are for example great instruments similar to didges made by Europeans Americans Asians etc but at least these are usually not declared as being authentic from Aboriginals.

Paul from USA

No

The aboriginal people have lent us so much of their beautiful culture including these fine instruments. It is right and fair to recognize this contribution and their masterful ability to create such fine instruments by patronizing firms(such as The Didjshop) that give credit where it is rightly due. Thanks for helping us enjoy this fine instrument while still celebrating the culture that gave it to us!

Peggy Adams from USA

No

It is a cultural shame

Peggylynn Terrien from USA

No

It is a shame that money gets in the way of indigenous peoples life and art and livelihood I hate rip offs and the people who do it I have a didj that is real and I will not buy a fake

Peter from Sweden

No

Both and. You can't keep a technique or a certain music instrument to some people. Compare with lappish handicraft. I can make similar things look the same but it is not lappish handicraft because I'm not a lapp.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

Clearly there are job opportunities for local aboriginal people to start up cooperatives to sell didjes. Overseas customers would prefer to buy the genuine article made by an Aborigine

Petri from Finland

No

I had an idea about that fact but didn't know exact statistics. It's Sad. Greed is a deadly sin!

Phil from USA

No

Having native american ancestry I can understand the special cultural bond of such a creation as a didgeridoo. A copy would not be "alive" it would be just a piece of wood to me.

Phil from France

No

I think it's a major problem a part from the fact people think real Didjes are made out of bamboo and you buy them on the african markets aboriginal people have lost a part of their heritage and they were the ones to create this amazing musical instrument.

Anonymous from Germany

No

It's sad...

Anonymous

No

Saddened

Ray Higgins from Australia

No

I feel it is a great pity that the best suppliers of didges are not protected as a lot of the didges for sale in melbourne australia are rubbish. with a reliable supply I feel the didge would be more appreciated.

Anonymous

No

Makes me want to buy something to support them

René from Netherlands

No

Not good the aboriginal people need the money to get a better live

Anonymous from Canada

No

Sad

Richard from Belgium

No

Not good. Didgeridoo is an aboriginal article they should earn a sort of compensation for all the articles made elsewhere.

Richard Kaiser from Italy

No

It's unfair and sad! But for most people it's just 'bout money.

Anonymous from USA

No

Hardly seems fair - no patents?

Richard from USA

No

They should receive some money

Richard from United Kingdom

No

If it is not authentic there should be a law banning replicas.

Rick Malone from USA

No

This is a sad truth. Aboriginal art is very unique. Unfortunately there is a ready worldwide market for all things Aboriginal and those peoples do not benefit at all.

Rick Whelan from Australia

No

It sucks but hardly surprising seeing as how greedy and self centered the average australian is.

Robert from USA

No

It's okay I guess but people should be made aware of the origin of the instrument and what makes a traditional "real" instrument.

Robert from USA

No

This takes from the history but exposes more people to the hobby

Anonymous from USA

No

Perhaps Aboriginal people should make more of them

Robert from USA

No

I think it's a shame but typical of what happens when a product becomes popular.

Robert from United Kingdom

No

Shameful! I own two didges - both genuine Aboriginal didges.

Anonymous from Sweden

No

I hope that will change cause I think the more people know about this fact the better the chance is I think that people will know that this isn't good.

Roger from United Kingdom

No

Original would be best and money should go directly to the makers

Rolf from United Kingdom

No

It seems like another case of exploitation whereby copies are made and sold for the greed of individuals/ companies with no respect for the originator.

Ron from USA

No

People need to be informed of this fact whenever and wherever didges are mentioned.

Anonymous from Canada

No

Didn't know that fact.

Anonymous from Spain

No

Well to tell you the truth I do not expect to have in my hands an authentic australian didgeridoo when paying 30 at a local shop of my city for a "didgeridoo"(made by african immigrants probably)....but still it is a beginning and after sometime I guess I'll want something more properly called didgeridoo (like a Aboriginal-australian made one)

Anonymous

No

Not too hard to believe - although very unfortunate. I buy 'fair trade' coffee so I'd prefer to support Aboriginals if I was to buy one.

Anonymous

No

Not right

Sabine from Netherlands

No

I think that the Aboriginal people should at least get part of the money.

Sally Ann Bryant from USA

No

Aboriginal people should receive money for any sold.

Sally from USA

No

No...I think its sad.

Samuel from France

No

Just feel disgusted!

Sandy from USA

No

It's unfortunate

Anonymous

No

It's sad

Anonymous from Finland

No

It sucks!

Scot Glackman from USA

No

Having traveled in Australia I understand the importance of helping a culture who gave us the didgeridoo. Elsewhere like America people need more education on the matter.

Anonymous

No

A musical instrument should be public domain. Perhaps a more generic name could be used for non-aboriginal instruments. Like sparkling wine instead of Champagne or Blue Cheese instead of Roquefort.

Scott from USA

No

I that people are stealing from their culture

Scott from USA

No

It's sad that others feel compelled to take advantage of others for the sheer sake of making money.

Anonymous

No

This is not right!

Simon Ashby from United Kingdom

No

Not sure I have friends who have made split didges for me and this is a valuable thing. Of course tapping the true source is and will always be of incredible value.

Stan from USA

No

They likely are poor sounding

Stane Andolek from Slovenia

No

I am not agree with this fact. Didj is part of their culture. They know everything the best about how to play and how to paint it. They just haven't enough power to protect their culture. And they know the best how to protect nature not to cut down all the forest to find few didj. People could respect their culture more not just to steal...for profit...

Anonymous

No

It is a shame

Steve from USA

No

I believe that it should be a law that you cannot sell a product under false pretenses and also should be stated upon purchase the origin of the didgeridoo

Sue from Canada

No

LITTLE BIT CONFUSING FOR THE BUYER

Anonymous from USA

No

Anger of course this is the way all things are going. I could continue but it would be considered ranting

Susan from USA

No

That's sad.

Anonymous

No

Surprised

Szabolcs Nemeth from Hungary

No

This is terrible every person who is interested for didj...the first question must be... it is 100% aboriginal?

Tammy from USA

No

I believe that true didgeridoo players should respect the origins of this unique and ancient instrument. Having said this each person should make an effort to research where their money is going.

Anonymous

No

Sounds like people need to be educated.

Anonymous

No

Sad. Especially when the Aboriginal culture is used to sell these products.

Anonymous

No

Interesting

Tero from Finland

No

Simple and blunt IT SUCKS.

Terry from USA

No

I believe credit should be given where credit is due. Any recompense should be within the order of the belief system of the originators.

Theresa from USA

No

It is very disturbing. I am still amazed at how few abhorring people are still around.

Theresa from South Africa

No

Exploitation - same as the Hoodia phenomenon in South Africa. But can understand why. Our weak currency makes it difficult for the average man to afford the real thing. (Cannot comment on other countries like UK / States).

Thomas from Canada

No

It's disappointing but it doesn't surprise me. Once there is a market many people will jump in.

Tiago from Portugal

No

Using aboriginal trees to make didgeridoos and claim them for aboriginal authentic is a crime. I feel that people over the world need to be educated to respect the earth and all the living beings. If this sacred knowledge is spread worldwide then we can expect a good future to humans and the earth.

Anonymous

No

I think that 10% of profits made should go to the aborigines

Tina Johnston from Australia

No

It's unfair

Anonymous

No

I feel it is degrading to native artists and confusing the buyers.

Tom Gibson from United Kingdom

No

Its a bit of a shame but I would never have began playing the didgeridoo if it wasn't for a friend and his £10 bamboo didge also being a student I cannot afford an expensive aboriginal didge though I would like one.

Tom from USA

No

People are misguided

Toni from USA

No

Am neutral. The more didges being played the more good vibes on the atmosphere as far as I'm concerned.

Tony Kiser from USA

No

If the didj comes from australia the aboriginal people should be in control of how many Didjes are produced and what is done with the profits

Tracey from USA

No

That seems like economically rotten for the Aboriginal people

Trey Sansom from USA

No

It really depends on the material that the didges are made of and the location of the artist. For example if a guy in the USA is making and selling didges made of local hardwoods or pvc I don't feel that they have any monetary obligation to the Aboriginal people. But if a guy is in Australia cutting from the eucalyptus forests and selling the didges as artifacts and tourist items I feel that they have an obligation to the indigenous people of the land. I also believe that if it wasn't for the guy selling cheap pvc didges to beginners there would not be the interest in or the sale of much higher priced authentic instruments myself included. I began with a piece of pvc and then sought and bought my Aboriginal crafted termite hollowed way more expensive didge. Also if 90% of didges sold are non-Aboriginal then the demand far exceeds the supply of these instruments and if all nonindiginous makers stopped making didges the price of the instruments would skyrocket and only be attainable by a few elite (i.e. very wealthy) individuals. On the other hand I hate to see any group of people be taken advantage of and exploited. It is their culture and one of their main sources of income. Illegal harvesting is a real problem not only for the Aborigines but also for the ecosystem so that is a practice that needs to be thwarted. Also I believe it is wrong to misrepresent a didgeridoo as being Aboriginal when it is not. So really there are valid arguments for both sides. If the Aboriginal people would like more of the market share then they need to produce more instruments.

Vedran Katušić from Croatia/Hrvatska

No

Did not know that but if I had even think about I would come to that answer I know that humans are alike and can be blind when they need to be graceful and thankful for the knowledge they got from those people because we can understand our roots from such artifact tribe and the beauty of their simple minds mixed with imagination that has no room for doubt.Evil manifestation is upon civilized people and aboriginal tribe are the healers good thing in all is that they can live money free course not all of them will be able to make some money but recognition allove the world and all players around the world to tell them 1 story story how 1 tribe can die which within contains the truth as it happened and that's why we didge players and all lovers of the world need to make them really high on level from earth to the god in eyes of blind mortal man.

Vicki from USA

No

I think this is wrong

Vickie Mccoy from USA

No

That seems wrong and unfair to real Aboriginal artists.

Vickie from USA

No

Very unfair.

Anonymous

No

It's a little bit unfair.

William Causey from USA

No

Sad

Anonymous from USA

No

Not fair

Yerai Oliveras from Puerto Rico

No

Australian Law should prevent this.

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Check out other selections of our visitors' comments:

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

 

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