Didgeridoo enthusiasts love Didjshop.com!
Where you can listen to your didgeridoo before you buy

Did you know that well over 90% of all didgeridoos sold are not made by Aboriginal people,
nor is any money from those sales returned to Aboriginal people?

On this page you can read the answers our visitors gave to this question as part of our yearly visitor surveys, where you can win great prizes.
(we post comments only if permission was given)

Over the years we have asked our visitors many different questions and any of the below topics contain hundreds of comments from people all over the world. Enjoy reading what other people have to say on those subjects:-). If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Name and Country

Did you know that fact?

What do you think or feel about the fact that well over 90% of all didgeridoos sold are not made by Aboriginal people, nor is any money from those sales returned to Aboriginal people?

Anonymous

No

It is a fact how is not fair

Alan from Australia

No

I feel only Aboriginal people should make them

Anonymous

No

It's a cultural theft

Alonso Elizondo from Mexico

No

I feel sad for it because our world culture vision and learning are being lost; on this times people are changing without reason of what are they doing I don't want to change proper culture in Aboriginal people or in economy progress because they have their beautiful beliefs I only would like to share those lessons to my community trying to bring a little bit of what our world is showing us with the help of this music instrument.

Andrew Sargent from Australia

No

I find it disappointing that this is true. I wouldn't consider it a real didgeridoo if it wasn't made by and painted by an Aboriginal artist. 90% is a very large amount and that would be a lot of money back in the Aboriginal community not to mention more jobs for people in the communities as well.

Andy Wood from United Kingdom

No

I try very hard to ensure that any didges I buy are fairly traded -maybe Oz needs to get into the Fairtrade Federation - there are many of us in the UK aware of this issue and making it public

Angela from USA

No

This is absurd! made in china? I bet that is the truth of the matter

Anonymous from Denmark

No

In my opinion buying a didgeridoo which is not made by Aboriginal People is a bit like buying a copy of a Gucci hand bag: It's a copy and it will never be the same experience to play a copy item compared to playing an authentic didgeridoo!

Anonymous

No

That this fact is a really

Anonymous

No

I think it's awful!

Anonymous from USA

No

I feel that the Aboriginal people should be the ones to benefit from the sales. We should strive to be sure we are supporting them by being sure we are buying didgeridoos from them and that they receive benefit from the sales.

Ben from USA

No

Well I'm not certain about the sound quality but it's going to happen.

Ben from USA

No

I absolutely believe it is wrong to sell "traditional" didges or didges that are marked as being Aboriginally produced if they were not in fact made by Aboriginals. There needs to be a clear way to distinguish Aboriginal made didges. In particular it should be illegal to market non-Aboriginal didges as such and whatever scheme is adopted should *not* place an undue burden on the Aboriginal didge markers. The system should be flexible enough to allow for Aboriginal art-work on non-Aboriginal didges or non-Aboriginal art-work on Aboriginal didges etc. It should be easy to distinguish exactly what part of the didge was Aboriginal in origin (the didge the artwork etc.). This should apply to other types of Aboriginal products/artwork as well. There should also be some way of distinguishing products that are not Aboriginally produced but somehow benefit the Aboriginal people. For example if the maker donates a certain percentage of the price of the product to the Aboriginal people.

Anonymous

No

I think that Aboriginal People groups should be the only ones selling instruments made from their local resources. ie... no large corporations!

Bill O'connell from USA

No

I'm disappointed. I strongly support the Aboriginal people and would only knowingly purchase the products they craft

Anonymous

No

I don't think anyone should have sole ownership of a musical instrument but I also believe that didgeridoos should be clearly labelled as to their origin so that a consumer can make an informed decision.

Bjørn from Norway

No

I¨d rather support the aborigines but there are certain items like the slide didge that can be made by factories.

Anonymous from USA

No

Not an issue for me

Brad Powell from USA

No

This makes me sad. Selling aboriginal art is many times the only way the people can make a living in this modern world while still maintaining their traditional culture. Non-aboriginals selling imitation art not only takes money the from aboriginal community if it's not done properly it can also diminish the culture. The native americans are also facing the same issues.

Brenton Roberts from Australia

No

Money should be given back to their community and Didjes should continue to be made by other people besides aboriginals as long as they are made correctly and to the same standards

Brian from USA

No

It's a total scam and this should be regulated by law.

Brian Greed from United Kingdom

No

All articles claiming to be genuine Aboriginal art or made by Aboriginal people should donate half of any money received to Aboriginal people. And the articles must state that they are not original.

Bruce from Australia

No

I do not believe that Aboriginal people should have or need a monopoly on making didges but the origin of each instrument should be made clear by the vendor so that the inexperienced buyer can be aware of what an experienced player would know by inspecting and handling it.

Bryan Auld from USA

No

Frankly this is an outrage! 2 Years ago I spent 6 months studying the Aboriginal Culture and Dream Time Story based in Kalgoorlie WA. During this time I was exposed to the Aboriginal didjeridu production process and how native artwork was painted onto the instruments. That was the main reason I bought mine! (the sense of nativity to the instrument) Perhaps if they were given some proceeds from the sales Aboriginals would be financially able to produce more native didjeridoos.

Cal from Australia

No

Feel that there should b more aboriginals making Didjes because people should only b able to real Didjes by aboriginals also if that 90percent of Didjes were made by aboriginal people there would b more aboriginal employment especially in northern territory where there needs to b more aboriginals employment

Caleb Long from USA

No

It is wrong I have some didgeridoos that I haven't gotten from other stores and not only do they not compare in the sound quality but the fact that they have no real home my healing didge in the key of A ds-930f is the carving on it is hands down the best didge I have had the joy of playing. and holds within it a feeling of power that I have never felt from an instrument ever before.

Carl from USA

No

It totally sucks! However since I live in the USA I'm used to evil rich people getting richer at the expense of the human race.

Carol from Canada

No

It's unfortunate

Casey from Canada

No

All didgeridoos made should have some proceeds put back into the aboriginal community. It is an amazing instrument created by the aboriginal people and they deserve acknowledgement for this.

Anonymous

No

Well it would be different if the Aboriginals made them themselves but as they don't l don't see why they should get paid. What about drums guitars pianos etc..do the relatives of the first persons to create and make these instruments get paid for other peoples work?...its no different to aborigines getting paid..if they made them themselves sure they should get paid but as they don't they shouldn't.

Chris Trail from Canada

No

I feel that there should be more money getting to the aboriginal people who know best the history of the didje.

Christian from Canada

No

Makes me quite sad especially before you know that fact and buy a bamboo didj which juts cracks after a few uses.

Christopher from United Kingdom

No

It's not surprising but it is very unfair.

Anonymous

No

Its not fair

Claude Beaucaire from Canada

No

It isn't fair.

Anonymous from Germany

No

That depends on the circumstances. If it is stated as not original instrument I think this is ok.

Anonymous

No

It's terrible.

Courtney from USA

No

I think it's a shame that not many authentic didgeridoos are available. I also believe that this art form should not be limited to Aboriginal people and am happy that no-Aboriginals appreciate the art enough to produce them.

Damien from Ireland

No

It's a sad reflection of the attitudes of people towards the indigenous peoples of Australia and their culture.

Dan from United Kingdom

No

I think the fact is disgusting as is the way they are treated especially when it comes down to land rights in my eyes it s there country.

Dana Doliber from USA

No

I think it is a terrible injustice for the Aboriginal people. Every time that happens a part of who they are is lost.

Dave Feetam from Australia

No

It is wrong! how can they be marketed as "authentic" when not made by indigenous Australians?

Anonymous from USA

No

They should be horsewhipped

David Lassio from USA

No

I think we need to educate the public about these facts. The Aboriginal people would enjoy the proceeds from this skill and trade.

David Mason from New Zealand

No

My own people the Irish Celts go back thousands of years.....but the Aboriginal people far longer than this. And the fact they have survived this long as a unique identity is worthy of respect. The didjeridu is unique to their life culture and history and they deserve fair and just acknowledgement (and return!) for each one originating and created by them. Sadly it may be impossible to grant patent rights to Aboriginal peoples but this website and other quality Didj sites like it may go a long way to redressing this issue. AND of course promotion of their craft by word of mouth.

David Smith from USA

No

Should be authentic

David from USA

No

Bad

Dean Archer from United Kingdom

No

Its wrong

Anonymous from Ireland

No

It's kind of typical in the world today and is a difficult situation to manage. It's exploitation of the aboriginal people.

Diederik Wydooghe from Belgium

No

There must be serious Quality Differences

Dorothy from USA

No

I had no idea the percentage was 90%.

Anonymous from Australia

No

It saddens me. I'm angry and shocked!

Ed from Netherlands

No

It has a good side and a bad one. The good side is that more people can play the didge but the bad side is that aboriginals are deprived of income.

Ed Obermeyer from USA

No

I think it terrible. A percentage of funds should go to the Aborigines for every didge sold worldwide.

Anonymous from Canada

No

I'm not very surprised seeing as there are always rip-off's of everything being made nowadays.

Evert-jan from Netherlands

No

Well I think it's weird that other people make the didge because the invention is made by the aboriginal people so it belongs to them. But because more people around the world like to play the didge then the only solution will be that other people will make the didge to. So everyone around the world can get one.

Francesco from Italy

No

I think it's important to inform people about it because few know about aboriginal culture. Cultural diversity is so important especially in times like these. Every time I play the didj I always try to introduce the instrument to the audience before I start so they know something about aboriginal people.

Frank Fitzpatrick from USA

No

I think it is a lousy deal for Aboriginal people.

Gareth Carter from South Africa

No

Being a South African I understand the need to protect a cultures heritage. I think that if non aboriginal persons are making didgeridoos for commercial gain they should give a percentage of the profits back to the aboriginal culture in Australia.

Gerard School from Netherlands

No

OK as long as they harvest the material with respect to nature like most Aboriginals do. But some of the profits should go to preserving the nature where he Aboriginals live in. I personally prefer an original Aboriginal instrument because then I'm sure the instrument is made with love and respect not only for business.

Anonymous from Italy

No

It's a shame the nature is as always destroyed by "men of business" and aboriginal people are survived for a long time in a changed world. We must be grate for their existence.

Greg from Switzerland

No

I feel that other people and manufacturers have taken advantage of the exclusivity of this instrument and have jumped on the bandwagon so to speak selling didges whilst often making false claims about their origins and manufacturers. I think this is scandalous.

Hauke Kellner from Germany

No

Well its it's 1 out of 1412242 things that run wrong;). Of course it's not in my opinion I hope they will get some justice at last (this website seems to be a step in the right direction). Keep it up!

Herman Wennink from Netherlands

No

So it is

Anonymous

No

Nice

James from United Kingdom

No

I'm not surprised to hear that. Other than a few people at the didj workshop that I go to most that I know have bought theirs from souvenir shops including me.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

Not that surprising with the far east exports.

Jason from USA

No

Unauthentic but unfortunately the entire world has catered to this mode of supply and demand. I have one made by an Aborigine and a bunch that I have made from bamboo which is the only resource I have. I don't make much money off a percentage was given to an aboriginal friend who is a teacher and cultural performer in Sydney.

Jason from United Kingdom

No

Many didj-lovers here in the UK do not know how to obtain genuine aboriginal instruments and so make their own. Those that really get into it appreciate the value of a genuine didj and will seek one out. I don't believe aboriginals should have the exclusive right to making these instruments - after all swiss farmers don't expect exclusivity when it comes to Alp Horn manufacture - because layers will ultimately find genuine aboriginal instruments in their search for quality.

Jason from USA

No

When I first learned this I was a little angry at the fact that the Aboriginal people were not receiving anything. But I realized that music and the instruments that create it are too universal and too spiritually important to worry about on a materialistic level. I am glad that so many people have taken an interest in the didgeridoo and help spread its use.

Jason from Australia

No

I thought it was probably a high figure but not this high

Javi from Spain

No

I think that a percentage of all the sales you would have to give to Aboriginal people

Javier from Spain

No

It is unjustice...

Jeff Bottjer from USA

No

Welcome to global free trade! unfortunately this is for the large corporations' benefit.:(

Jill from Australia

No

It makes me sad to know that our country is quite happy to capitalise on the beauty of Aboriginal art and music for it's own financial gain but doesn't give that money back to the amazing people it comes from. I feel ashamed of how our country treats the native people of Australia. We are all One and should all be treated equal.

Jim Puckett from USA

No

This is an obscene fact!

Joao Carvalho from Portugal

No

Before reading this fact from your website I did not know. I think it's a shame. Aboriginal people should have the right to sell their didj culture as the real thing. Didj related handcrafts kind of license or stamp that could effectively prove its origin should be implemented in the market.

Joao Santos from Portugal

No

I think that everybody is free to make instruments but with a trade mark. That's the way to don't let people sales didjeridoos as an aborigines ones.

Anonymous

No

I think the aboriginal people should get some commission out of their heritage.

Joe from USA

No

This just reinforces my decision to only purchase didges from Didjshop.

Joe Kershner from USA

No

It is unfortunate. The aboriginal people are already so exploited and downtrodden the least that could be done is to leave their native arts and culture to them

John from Canada

No

I think/feel it is just another example of how commerce is more important than community. From my understanding not only does none of the money go back to the community but the way in which the "lumber" is harvested is - well - a shame. More devastation to the already fragile ecosystem instruments are barely that as the market is for the tourists who don't even understand or want to understand what the yidaki is all about (in most cases). I do not pretend to be an authority on the subject but from what I have read it makes me very sad for the Aboriginal people history and the forests from which they come.

Jon Christensen from USA

No

On the one hand it is a good thing to indicate that the Didge is gaining popularity. Of course it is always good to see those who created the art benefit from said art. I suppose the best thing to do would be to simply damn commercialism.

Jonathan Puhalsky from USA

No

Its a tragedy that the revenue is not returned to the aboriginal people. This money could be used to help them preserve there way of life. I don't see anything wrong with the sale of an untraditional didge as long as it is stated so. A sale of this nature helps to expose this great instrument to the masses at a price that a beginner is willing to invest which in turn helps to inform them. A result of this type of sale can lead to research and skill which in turn can generate sales of a traditional instrument.

Jonny Monument from United Kingdom

No

Bad. Authentic is the only way. A Steinway is only a Steinway when made by the people at Steinway. Didges are no different. it's like copyright. It exists to protect people's intellectual property and its values should certainly apply here. Shame on those who fail to help this happen.

José Antonio from Mexico

No

Que es tan grande el mundo que no se podria surtir todo el mercado por los aborígenes.

Joseph Kern from USA

No

This angers me in the sense that the people who originally made the didgeridoo isn't getting any credit or money out of it. You would think that there would be some kind of a patent on it so that those people would get the recognition/money that they desire.

Joy from USA

No

It is pretty disappointing

Anonymous

No

Very poor should have aboriginal input

Justin Hook from USA

No

I feel that what is happening to the aboriginals and their land is an outrage. people need to realize what an amazing culture they are and try to learn everything we can from them. they have a lot they can teach us.

Kathy Hornick from USA

No

Typical

Katy from USA

No

Since its their culture at least the %10 should be theirs.

Anonymous

No

I feel that this is unfortunate. The didgeridoos are an important factor in their culture and if they are not made by the Aborigines then at least the government should make those selling them to give a portion of that money back to the people.

Anonymous from Canada

No

This is not just. While I do believe that a true lover of the instrument from any cultural background has the right to make any instrument the majority of these makers are capitalizing on the aboriginal connection and ignorance of the buyers to make a quick buck.

Anonymous from USA

No

It makes me sad that so many companies create knock-offs and try to sell them as authentic.

Kevin from USA

No

I think its rotten

Kevin Summers from USA

No

I think it is another crime against humanity. I would personally work to correct the atrocity as it constantly occurs on a daily basis. I also think a way should be developed to determine what the aboriginal people as a member of the world community want to happen in regard to this situation. I believe that other members of the world community should insure that the Aboriginal Way is protected and carried out in as much as no harm is ever conveyed to any member of the world community. To sum up if it doesn't hurt anybody out side of the Aboriginal Community the Aboriginal people should determine their own destiny and then be allowed to pursue that destiny to whatever end.

Anonymous

No

It is a shame that in our world today we often lose quality over the mass marketing to supply cheaply made items to the "I want it now" generation. Being from eastern Canada we are also seeing this in Mic Mac baskets..they are hard to come by it is a dying art form and no one really seems to care. Luckily for me I have found a band in Quebec that still do and I have been filling my home with their baskets while I can..

Kristoffer Stensbo-Smidt from Denmark

No

I don't think the problem is people selling non-Aboriginal didgeridoos the problem is people selling non-Aboriginal didgeridoos AND claim them to be made by Aborigines. You can't make it illegal to sell didgeridoos which are not made by Aborigines but these should definitely be marked as such. And the real problem is of course that most people do not know the huge difference between Aboriginal and ?akedidgeridoos. I don't think either that it would be fair to charge all didgeridoo makers and sellers to support the Aborigines (as long as didgeridoos are not patented) but I would gladly pay twice the price if I could be sure that the money was going to the Aborigines. So I think there should be some kind of ?boriginal trademarkto be given to traders supporting the Aborigines. I think many more people would buy from those traders if they knew that they were supporting the Aborigines.

Anonymous

No

Wow

Laurence from United Kingdom

No

Disgusted it's always the same; as soon as something becomes fashionable and therefore moneymaking there will always be those who exploit it with no thought for those they rip off!

Anonymous from Belgium

No

I think its a scandal. I think the didjes witch are made by the aboriginals are much much better than the fabricated didjes witch are on the market now. That's why I love this shop because it sells original didjes no fakes. Dreamtime for ever!

Lee Evans from United Kingdom

No

Their culture is being ripped off

Levi from Brazil

No

That is strange... If they invented and made the didj... so they have the right on them ( like a copyright) and obviously they know how to do it better than every one

Libby from USA

No

That is a large percentage and I feel that Aboriginal people should get some of the credit. I also almost feel as if I would feel more secure buying a Didgeridoo from Aboriginal people because it originated from them so this statistic is rather shocking.

Linda Hendricks from USA

No

It sucks

Anonymous from Australia

No

I think its sad that white people take their traditional ways just to make profit.

Linda from USA

No

I think the Aboriginal people should get some compensation from all didj sales. I also believe beginners should be able to purchase inexpensive Didjes to practice and see if they have the ability or need to have a better didj later. But they should know that the inexpensive didj is not made by an Aboriginal person before purchase.

Anonymous

No

I think that it's unfortunate for many reasons and I'm glad that didjshop.com supports the maintenance of this traditional art form for Aboriginal society.

Liz from Australia

No

It upsets me. The indigenous people of Australia have been screwed over since 1788 and as an Australian and a human being it embarrasses me that it continues. Human rights issues aside the dishonesty that has engulfed indigenous art in this country is appalling. It makes it virtually impossible for artists to retain the value of their work and is a nightmare for the very best intentioned of first-time buyers to purchase a genuine item.

Luciano from Argentina

No

I think that it should be stated if the didj has an aboriginal origin. I'm not sure if aboriginal people should get royalties for these didjes but then I don't have all the information on the subject to make any judgment.

Anonymous from USA

No

I'm uncomfortable about it.

Anonymous from USA

No

I think the maker of the didgeridoo should always be known to the customer

Marc from Luxembourg

No

It is ok when non aboriginal people manufacture didges. Only this should be clearly indicated to the purchaser. I use the didge to make music and some western creations like the slide or glass didges might be fun and interesting to try... As for the problem with the aboriginal people I honestly don' t know. They 'invented' the didgeridoo and certainly should touch some form of profit from its sale but the problem goes a lot further than that. They are not allowed to live their traditional lifestyle anymore and forced to adapt to the modern world (same problem with the Indians in North and Latin America). Tough problem which must be taken care of on a political base. Maybe stopping hoards of tourists to trample on sacred sites would be a good start...Indigenous people everywhere in the world tend to disappear along with their culture because western society has no time for tradition. Unless of course you could build a tourist trap out of it...

Anonymous from Australia

No

It's not on

Marcus Holm-Petersen from Germany

No

I could assume that a lot of didges are non australian ones. There are artists like Stefan T. or Walter S. [full names deleted] who create wonderful didges from native tree wood and I love the idea. But talking about the suppression of the Aboriginal-culture its a shame and has to do with greed and the lust for power. I feel thankful and openhearted of the old wise people in australia. The didge is a gift to any creature. And it should be known that this instrument belongs to their culture.

Margaret from USA

No

Grim which is why I am checking out your site. I bought 2 didges one was given away and one burned but both were made by a friend.

Anonymous from USA

No

The aboriginal community should pursue and lobby diligently to be able to have their individual talents and endeavours acknowledged. Everyone should be able to express their talents and make an honest living.

Anonymous from USA

No

I feel that it depends on which point of view you take. You could say it isn't right because they were the original creators of didgeridoos. You could also say that it is okay because there are now many different types of didgeridoos (plastic metal wooden etc.) and anyone can now know how great of an instrument it really is.

Anonymous

No

Angry and annoyed

Mary Lindhart from USA

No

That is pretty sad news for me to hear.

Anonymous from USA

No

I didn't know

Matthew from USA

No

This is an unfortunate fact. There are many other instruments of differing cultures that are also poor quality fakes such as the Native American flute and Scottish bagpipes. I think people who truly appreciate these cultures and instruments should only buy from known quality sources such as your site.

Matthew from Canada

No

I think it is tragic. Australian Aboriginal people have lost so much at the hands of white colonizers and now their culture is being exploited and stolen as well.

Anonymous

No

Its wrong the aboriginal heritage should be preserved.

Max Nelson from USA

No

It is bullshit why do most people exploit a culture like that.

Meri from Australia

No

Who makes them then and who gets the money? maybe only aboriginal originals should be called didgeridoos.

Michael from USA

No

This is equal to stealing ideas and monies from the people who are the real artists.

Michael Potter from Australia

No

We'll that's legal. I would prefer that circumstances were not as they are but we live in a democracy.

Michael Sleiman from Canada

No

That's sad it at least shows that more people are getting involved with the aboriginal culture but its sad that nothing goes back to the people. It seems that that's all we do is take what is rightfully theirs and pawn it off as our own. Perfect example is the land I'm from Canada and its sad.

Anonymous from Finland

No

Its very bad

Anonymous

No

Sad sad. How about you guys? Is it owned by Aboriginals or...? And what is your arrangement?

Anonymous from Canada

No

Its kool

Nick Buckley from USA

No

Unfortunately it is a fact of life that people will cash in on any worthwhile product and sell cheap poor quality merchandise often under false descriptions. i.e. using words like "authentic"

Anonymous

No

It is very sad but not surprising.

Nicole from USA

No

It is a shame and should not be allowed to happen. A law should me made concerning this and enforced. Maybe a hefty tax should be charged to any company making such didges for every didge they sell not made by a aboriginal native and the tax money should go to the Aboriginal people.

Numa Lallemand from Belgium

No

I think it is quite fair I think that every job has to be paid to the jobber;BUT I also think that the aboriginal land and territories has to be respected and I would feel very sad and angry if I would buy and play on a didge that has been stolen from any sacred ground.it also a reason why I made them myself with local wood [I come from belgium[

Anonymous from Ireland

No

I appreciate the fact that the Aboriginal people have been disenfranchised in this area but I also think that if an instrument is made from scratch by someone who is not associated to the Aboriginal people financially or emotionally then why should they share the profits of their individual endeavours with them.

Patty from Canada

No

Non-aboriginals should not be banned from making them and should not be required to share profits with aboriginals. ADDITIONALLY aboriginals should not be banned from making non-aboriginal type products and should not be required to share profits with non-aboriginals.

Paul Brown from USA

No

I would rather have something that is true to its nature made by the people who use them!

Paul Cyr from USA

No

It's sad to see what society has become anything to make a dollar. It's also hard to stomach the fact that the majority of people don't even look into the didges they buy.

Paul Meneghini from Italy

No

It's really a theft

Anonymous

No

Its unfortunate but probably very little can be done to change that fact

Peter Callinicos from USA

No

It's a disservice to the original Aboriginal Didgeridoo makers.

Peter Jackson from New Zealand

No

It stinks!

Anonymous

No

I'd rather buy from Aboriginal

Phil Flowers from United Kingdom

No

I think it's absolutely appalling and insulting to Aboriginal people and a sad indictment of white Australia.

Rachael from Switzerland

No

That it undermines the industry the community and culture.

Ravyn Nimchuk from USA

No

It bothers me while at the same time it is an accent. Instead of having to pay hundreds of dollars to have an authentic dig made shipped then spend ours of frustration trying to play it work out circular breathing there are less expensive avenues. I worked with my father at a festival and there was a dig maker in the sop behind ours. His were made from bamboo and higher pitched. It was on one of those I first learned to breath and play. Latter I was looking at some PVC digs and found them quite easy to play while my friends could not manage to produce the proper tones. I later gave them my bamboo one and they were able to play it. So while I do not necessarily agree that every Didgeridoo must come from Australia I do understand that for the bet quality and those who are very much into them you are providing a wonderful service.

Richard from South Africa

No

The Oz govt should prohibit the sale of any non-indigenously produced didjes in Oz. If that is too extreme at least prevent the importation of non-indigenous didjes.

Anonymous from USA

No

I think it is a good idea.

Robert from USA

No

I think it's important that the aboriginal people should benefit from the sales of the didj's taken from their land

Roger from USA

No

This dilutes the authenticity of any art or expression especially when the art that should be created in a sacred manner is not. Understanding that the intent of the maker is always imprinted into any art or artifact renders the artifact enviable when made as a knockoff or fake. Understand quantum intertanglement and you will understand what I mean.

Rose from USA

No

This is about as absurd as the demolition of precious petroglyphs for short-term energy goals. The value of one of these instruments is as much due to its cultural heritage as its musical quality.

Roy Páramo from Spain

No

It's a problem that we must face trying to make fairtrade with didjeridoos as Oxfam does with coffee chocolate etc.

Roy Wykoff from USA

No

I think it is wrong. Great respect is needed for the Aboriginal people. We tend to forget the ROOTS!! of the didgeridoos.

Rupert from United Kingdom

No

I think the aboriginal people should benefit from all sales of didgeridoos and genuine hand finished items should be promoted over inferior tourist rubbish.

Ryan from USA

No

I believe that while people do have a right to create and sell everything within legal limits they should respect the origins of the didgeridoo and donate a portion of their proceeds to aboriginal foundations.

Ryan from USA

No

I think the people are getting ripped off.

Anonymous

No

Well I prefer originality.

Samiul Ghani from United Kingdom

No

It shocked me to the core. It just goes to show that imperialist exploitation has never ceased in Australia but instead has shifted into the less conspicuous realms of big business.

Sandra from USA

No

I think it is fraud and it is taking money away from those who deserve it. It is people taking advantage of another person's true skill and the ignorance of the average tourist

Anonymous

No

Pathetic really

Sharon Calvert from USA

No

I think it is wrong and feel that Aboriginal people should be making selling and obtaining money for their own artwork. Those who exploit the native people should be stopped.

Sheridan from Australia

No

Well that make them not originally cultural if they weren't made by an aboriginal. Kinda takes the meaning away from them.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

Appalling. Another example of Australia's indigenous people being exploited.

Stan from USA

No

Authenticity should be required on the purchase

Anonymous from Australia

No

Disappointed

Steven Lloyd from Canada

No

That's very unfortunate that not many people ever get the real deal a hand made didgeridoo made by an aboriginal in the out back on a walkabout(beautiful) the Aboriginal people disserve more then just the money from the sales also they should get recognition for who they are. and the whole story they have should be shared with all.

Sybil from Australia

No

This is wrong. It is your instrument and is not authentic if not made by Aboriginals in Australia.

Anonymous from Canada

No

I personally think that whoever made them should get the money.

Anonymous

No

As a traditional craft didges should be made and sold by Aboriginal people it seems unfair for others to capitalize on it. There should at least be some money paid to Aboriginal peoples.

Todd from USA

No

I believe that the items should indicate that they are not made by Aboriginal people on them if that is the case.

Tom from USA

No

If more people are turned on by the didj the better but people should not sell fakes.

Tomas from USA

No

The flow of energy should go back to the originators or keepers of this ancient wisdom in different ways. Money recognition respect. In that way they should get some more money that they are doing now but at the same time if other people are doing good sounding Didges they are creating a universal healing tool or way of manifesting the sound of spirit for anyone and anywhere. The more people play the didge the better our world is going to be waking up peoples to the ancient memories of our ancestors; the original people.

Tony Romano from United Kingdom

No

Saddened and angry

Triinu from Estonia

No

It should be the other way round: 90% of didgeridoos sold by Aboriginal people

Tyler Kehoe from USA

No

I think it is sad and more people should know.

Victor Remmers from Netherlands

No

So far its a free world. Apart from that: there are also european drone instruments based on the same principle.

Anonymous

No

Nous n'avons pas tous les moyens financiers d'acheter un didjeridu à 600 euros

Previous Page

Return to Top

Check out other selections of our visitors' comments:

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

 

If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

Visit The Didjshop

Check out the world's coolest shop for didgeridoos

The Didgeridoo Specialist - founder of didjshop.com