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Did you know that well over 90% of all didgeridoos sold are not made by Aboriginal people,
nor is any money from those sales returned to Aboriginal people?

On this page you can read the answers our visitors gave to this question as part of our yearly visitor surveys, where you can win great prizes.
(we post comments only if permission was given)

Over the years we have asked our visitors many different questions and any of the below topics contain hundreds of comments from people all over the world. Enjoy reading what other people have to say on those subjects:-). If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

Name and Country

Did you know that fact?

What do you think or feel about the fact that well over 90% of all didgeridoos sold are not made by Aboriginal people, nor is any money from those sales returned to Aboriginal people?

Étienne from Canada

No

I think that there's no way in a capitalist society to stop fair or unfair competition between producers without putting in danger the economy. There's not much we can do in the long run. Strive for socialism.

Aaron from USA

No

It is a crime! Taking a piece of someone's culture for profit and not giving back.

Adam Diiulio from USA

No

I think it's lame. I just received one for christmas and as cool as it looks as soon as I tried to play it I knew it wasn't quality. It has many flaws that I know wouldn't pass had it been made by caring hands. I also feel aboriginal people should always receive a portion of the sales of aboriginal artwork.

Anonymous

No

It should be changed and be fair.

Aggeo Caccia from Italy

No

We need more information about these products

Anonymous

No

It's sad.

Anonymous from Canada

No

It's pretty sad actually!

Anonymous

No

I think that is horrible.

Aleksi from Finland

No

I don't like it.

Alisha from USA

No

That is sad I feel they should receive a profit in return.

Alison from Australia

No

I find it extremely disrespectful my aunty was one of the stolen generation and her parents family have often had to struggle to make ends meet. to produce counterfeit artwork on any scale is shameful let alone passing it off as native

Allegra from USA

No

It stinks! When I buy anything imported from a another country I want it to be authentic and for the people who crafted it to be paid fairly.

Amanda from USA

No

Wish more were made by them and that they could profit more from them.

Amber Fauson from USA

No

It's disturbing and sad. I am a firm supporter of Fair Trade and Equal Trade.

Anonymous from Hungary

No

I think it is very unfair for Aboriginal people but there is nothing we can really do about it. People will keep making didgeridoos and sell it to shops where exotic products are sold in any part of the world. For some

Andrew from Australia

No

Very sad!

Anonymous from Australia

No

It is disappointing as I know Aboriginal People near to us and their communities and traditions are sacred and close to their hearts

Angela from USA

No

If I'm right I'm surprised

Anonymous from USA

No

I have no feelings on this one way or the other.

Anonymous

No

I would rather have one made by the Aboriginal people.

Anu Van Leeuwen from Netherlands

No

It feels like stealing again form those who's souls have been tried to steal already!

Anonymous from USA

No

It sickens me. I think that a large part of what makes a didgeridoo so special is the culture and history. I would hope that my interest in the instrument and purchase of a didge would in some way benefit the people that created such an amazing instrument.

Barb from USA

No

Never new anything about them

Belinda Eaton from Spain

No

Sad the fact that very few people realise this when they buy a didgeridoo. And also the energy must be so very different in the mass marketed ones.

Bianke from South Africa

No

Due to the fact that the Didgeridoo is strongly ingrained within the Aboriginal people's culture and they are the ones who created this beautiful instrument not merely an instrument but also a part of their identity. Thus I think that The Aboriginal should be greatly rewarded in terms of receiving a portion of the sales. Making the Didgeridoo universal and public to all people desensitise the true meaning and origin of the didge thus exploiting and taking something very personal from them. Therefore when buying a didgeridoo one should take into account acknowledge appreciate and respect the cultural meaning of the didgeridoo.

Brad from USA

No

I think there should be a label designation such as "authentic aboriginal" or something of the like. Unfortunately this happens all the time to a culture or people that have cornered the quality of a market... look at bordeaux or champagne wines. But if they had the legal right just like wine at least then the consumer would know the true origin.

Anonymous

No

I guess that's bad??????

Anonymous from Australia

No

Like everything nowadays there are always ripoffs but people who want the real deal will spend the money on the original.

Anonymous from Switzerland

No

It's obviously not fair for the aboriginal people and part of the money must be returned to the people who have participated in the process of making the didge.

Brian from USA

No

Sucks!

Calvin from Canada

No

A little surprised I guess

Anonymous

No

It is sad. Didgeridoos are Aboriginal art and hence should be made by them also they should received the money from the sales

Catherine from Australia

No

It doesn't surprise me and it saddens me because I'm sure most Australians and tourists would prefer their money to go to Aboriginal people.

Anonymous from USA

No

Its totally unfair.

Anonymous

No

Wow

Anonymous

No

Speaking for myself when looking for native instruments I want as close to original as possible -- and certainly from the country of origin.

Charles from USA

No

I don't care

Chase Moser from American Samoa

No

I feel like the didgeridoos are sort of a rare instrument and that they should be exported thru out the world.

Chase from USA

No

This is both a positive and a negative thing. For me I first purchased my didge at a Bali import store and always wanted to learn to play and bought it. From then that non-Aboriginal didge helped me learn the culture and respect the art and music made by this instrument. It's not just a cool sound anymore it's a feeling and respect for Aborigine people and the instrument.

Chris from USA

No

This part's okay

Chris from USA

No

That sucks but big corporations frequently do this crafts and traditions of native peoples.

Chris from Australia

No

Well as long as it's not being advertised as being authentic then I don't see the harm though seeing some profits returned to the aboriginal peoples would be nice.

Anonymous

No

SAD

Anonymous

No

It's lame.

Anonymous

No

I don't like it.

Anonymous

No

I think that is too bad. It is an Aboriginal instrument and would be nice to see them benefitting from the making of them.

Cliff from USA

No

I feel it is extremely unfair

Anonymous

No

Saddened

Cory from USA

No

Aboriginals aren't getting the proper respect as it is and I believe in giving credit where credit is due. The Didj was created from their culture so the proper funds $$ should be returned to them not only for respect but to continue the culture.

Anonymous

No

Interesting

Ct from USA

No

I support buying on native made didges and will not purchase any others.

Dani from Australia

No

It feels like us as consumers are being misled

Daniel from USA

No

I think it's the thing to do

Anonymous from USA

No

Cool

Anonymous from USA

No

Surprising and offensive.

Dave from Canada

No

Frankly I am bothered that people try to make a buck off a beautiful culture.

David Jackson from Sweden

No

People shouldn't rip off others culture for a profit but similarly if an artist can make great instruments it shouldn't matter what culture he comes from.

David from USA

No

I think it's a shame that the exploitation of native peoples in Australia and across the world continues today.

David from France

No

It has both advantages and disadvantages. The advantages are that by buying cheaper less good quality didgeridoos people may want to buy a proper real Didgeridoo made by the aboriginal people in the future. The disadvantages are that in buying Cheaper fake didgeridoos people are not recognizing the aborigines culture and not contributing to the people in the sense that they don't get money to rebuilt their lives and to get out of poverty.

David from Australia

No

It's not surprising considering the overall popularity of the Didgeridoo or for that matter all Aboriginal artefacts. If there is a market for it then it is only reasonable to think someone has realized this and decided to exploit it.

Anonymous

No

I like it

Debby from USA

No

It just shows that the didgeridoo is becoming more popular and other people and companies are trying to cash in on the success.

Anonymous

No

I feel this should be stated on the product.

Denton from USA

No

Not good

Dominique from USA

No

I think it's disgusting.

Don from USA

No

I don't think that we can change the free market but you only get what you pay for and if you want the best then you buy the real thing

Anonymous from USA

No

A portion of the monies that are received from the a purchase of a didgeridoos needs to be donated back to Aboriginal people.

Donna from Australia

No

It is wrong & an insult

Doug from USA

No

A didj not made by the Aboriginal people does not have the same soul to it.

Dylan Davenport from USA

No

It's bullcrap! The Aboriginal people deserve credit for creating such a wonderful instrument. Not only is is it and instrument but a symbol of culture. They deserve recognition but nobody will give it to them. Like I said It's BULLCRAP!

Anonymous

No

I dunno

Anonymous

No

It's a crime.

Elaine from USA

No

I had no idea but I think that it should be changed. I have found that word of mouth is a great tool. I for one will be spreading the word!

Elliott from Canada

No

I feel as do most I assume that it is exploitation of the Aboriginal art form. However by the same token no one complains about the fact that bagpipes are being made in Pakistan (except the Scots of course). And that many North American Native Flute makers are White.

Erin from Australia

No

It's a travesty

Ethan Mud from USA

No

A quality instrument is made by the people that invented it. not by those who think to make a living and a killing from it

Anonymous from Ireland

No

Its difficult to force organisations to donate to Aboriginal causes but I would certainly only buy from companies who do

Fran from United Kingdom

No

It is about others cashing causing the Aboriginal people to loose out

Anonymous

No

This is wrong and the Aussie Govt. should do something about it.

Gary from Australia

No

This is a good fact not only do they create beautiful sounding instrument but their culture become recognized all around the world

Anonymous from USA

No

That surprised me

Genevieve from Australia

No

Not fair

Geoff from Canada

No

It's not right

Gina from USA

No

I think it's appalling that in our supposedly enlightened and civilized world that indigenous peoples are still being mercilessly exploited!

Anonymous from USA

No

That's messed up:(

Anonymous from Italy

No

It's not good for the economy and development of Aboriginal culture.

Graham from United Kingdom

No

Its a sad fact of the free market. At first thought I'd say that there should be legislation to avoid this. It would be "righteous" but thinking deeper I'm not sure a divisive approach is appropriate. I don't think anyone can say another man doesn't have the right to create something because they are the wrong race. Can I make chopsticks or do I have to be Chinese? The best way would be to educate the consumer - get slogans in shops drawing attention to the importance of aboriginal sourced didgeridoos.

Greg from Australia

No

I'm fine with that after all its a craft and should be experienced by anyone who has the ability to craft a musical instrument.

Guido from Israel

No

Unfortunately How can u control this? Its a "free capitalistic "world ain't it?

Anonymous

No

That is bad for both buyers and Aboriginal people.

Anonymous

No

Had no idea. It should go where it is most needed

Howard Davis from USA

No

Sucks

Hugo Ferreira from Portugal

No

I thing that you feel bad about it

Ian from Canada

No

Very wrong. The didge is a well known cultural artifact and musical instrument. While others should be allowed to make and/or use the didge its manufacture sale and profit should be of benefit to the Aboriginal people not a subject of cultural profit piracy!

Anonymous from Russia

No

If you're talking about plenty of those didjes have to be qualified under concert class - I agree it's sad thing. however person who really interested in didgeridoo would have at least one aboriginal didj (I have no one yet. YET)

Ivaylo from Bulgaria

No

I don't nol this fact

Anonymous

No

Stinks

Jamalun Taufik from Malaysia

No

Because easy to make didgeridoo

James Connelly from USA

No

Not Good

Anonymous

No

The Aboriginal people should be the best at making their instrument.

Anonymous from USA

No

That is sad

Jay from USA

No

The didj is a aboriginal art form a traditional part of their culture and I believe very strongly that native cultures should benefit from the dissemination of their cultural heritage. I liken this situation to the stealing of cultural artifacts from developing countries for sale on the world art market.

Anonymous

No

Fascinating

Jayden McCurnin from USA

No

It makes me sad.

Jean from USA

No

I think it is lousy

Anonymous

No

I am not surprised about this fact and feel that it is a shame!

Anonymous from USA

No

Feel pretty bad that they're not getting their due.

Anonymous

No

It is sad.

Anonymous from USA

No

Disgusted

Anonymous

No

Unfair

Anonymous

No

It just seems wrong

Jesse from USA

No

I think that that is messed up and culturally wrong.

Anonymous

No

Sad.

Jesse from Australia

No

I think it is extremely unfair for the aboriginal people that some sort of royalties are not paid to organisations and such however I can also appreciate that if people can not access a didgeridoo made by aboriginals or with proceeds going to aborigines and they still wish to express themselves through the didgeridoo then they should have the right to be able to do so and then maybe after they get the bug they will look a little further for a more authentic instrument

Anonymous

No

It's a disgrace

Jessica Davidson from USA

No

That's horrible.

Anonymous

No

Kind of sad.

Anonymous from USA

No

If the didj is marketed as aboriginal authentic etc. then there should be some "royalty" fee required. However this should not include anything clearly marketed as reproduction modern etc.

John from United Kingdom

No

This is not in the interests of the Aboriginal people

Anonymous from USA

No

That one made by the Aboriginal people would be really special.

Jon Larue from USA

No

That in it self is ok. competition for goods produced is the key to free enterprise and pushes the development of better products and services at competitive prices.

Jose Maria from Spain

No

Aboriginal people are not enough to make didj for everyone!! everyone wants one!!

Julia from USA

No

Sorry

Anonymous

No

Sad

Julie from USA

No

That stinks!

Anonymous

No

It's sad. a loss of heritage

Kara from USA

No

It's not fair it's just people exploiting their talents for their own selfishness.

Karen from Australia

No

I'm not happy with it.

Katherine from USA

No

I feel like it is fake to buy a didgeridoo that is not made from an aboriginal person and further fake for the money to not go to the creators of this beautiful instrument.

Kay from Australia

No

Disgraceful

Kei Tomono from Japan

No

I think that even a little can want sales amount to help the life of the Aboriginal people.

Anonymous from USA

No

I think part of the proceeds should go to help aboriginals.

Kent from USA

No

I have mixed feelings. at what point does commercialisation begin to erode a culture? here in usa the indians have had poor success with their culture respect etc. seems that all the money goes to casinos. as I read your news letter it helps me understand the plight of the Aboriginal people and it is comforting to know that there are persons out there with their best interest at heart.

Kevin Vorst from Netherlands

No

It s no problem to me.

Kevin Wilkinson from USA

No

I am appalled! It is imperative that the Aboriginal people get continued compensation for their craftsmanship. Without them we would not have the didgeridoo. We at least owe them that!!

Anonymous

No

Unfair to all - purchaser not getting what they thought and Aboriginal not getting the sale

Anonymous

No

I believe in cultural craftsmanship

Kristi from USA

No

Well it does open the instrument to people (like me) that can't normally afford one however there is nothing like the real thing! It is not right though that they try to pass them off on folks that don't know better.

Lara from USA

No

This fact makes me more likely to buy your products

Anonymous

No

Sucks

Laura from USA

No

While that is a shame it is good that the instrument and music is not dying out.

Anonymous

No

Not fair to the Aboriginal people.

Anonymous

No

This is a shame people shouldn't be cashing in on the ancient traditions.

Lisa from USA

No

Not sure

Anonymous from USA

No

That STINKS!

Manu from Spain

No

That is really a shame

Manu Plaza from Spain

No

Pretty normal fact nowadays

Manuel from Spain

No

Its sad but that's how the world do business

Margie from USA

No

Surprized

Anonymous

No

Unfair. This practice is greed driven and should not be allowed to continue.

Marjorie from USA

No

I feel that that is a shame. The didgeridoo is Aboriginal and should only be made by them with the proceeds to go to them.

Mark Elliott from Jersey

No

I did not know that didgeridoos were not all made by aboriginal people. But aboriginal people are poor people so I think any money or a percentage from a sale made by making didgeridoos by non aboriginals should be donated to them.

Anonymous

No

THis is a cultural and financial violation of First Peoples rights. Australia should halt all importing of Didjeridus.

Marlene Brussaard from Netherlands

No

People even sell their mother when it is about money

Martin Sørensen from Denmark

No

Its a crime... as simple as that.

Matt Doss from USA

No

I would be cool to play one that was actually made by an aborigine but I would still feel really cool regardless...lol

Anonymous from USA

No

Then 90% of didgeridoos not made by Aboriginal people are probably of lesser quality

Anonymous

No

I don't have an issue with the fact that others make didgeridoos and I acknowledge that other creators and artists are entitled to their share as well.

Melanie from USA

No

It is quite unfortunate as this is their heritage and should be entitle to all monies.

Michael from Australia

No

I think that the aboriginal people should be limited to making these masterpieces of their culture or at least some profits raised should be returned to the elders.

Michael Mitchell from Australia

No

I feel that for an aboriginal who's ancestors refined this medium didj it would be more fitting for them to claim more recognition and reward while sharing this with the world.

Anonymous from USA

No

Hate it

Michael from USA

No

I think that there is a lot of cultural theft in the world today. A group of people design a specific aspect of life and get no credit for it. Types of music and types of lifestyles are being changed and as a result are creating an environment of less and less unique characteristics. I think it is important that the originators are given credit for something but I am not sure how we will give anything monetary things back to anyone.

Michele from Australia

No

That is really unfair for the aboriginal people

Anonymous

No

That's a rip-off and is as bad as the crime of pirating software or music/movies.

Miles Bassin from USA

No

Yes and that sucks! It is very sad that such a wonderful piece of music and art from our humanity is lost to greed and people who take advantage of this.

Miles from Canada

No

Awful. It is a similar feeling to seeing copies of our local sacred aboriginal dance masks being made overseas and being sold here.

Miroslav Miskovic from Serbia

No

Simply it is not right because of the fact that most other didjes available now do not produce real didge sound and are just a way for easy money making.

Anonymous from USA

No

Not right

Mitra from India

No

Unscrupulous people have no ethic except making money at any cost. I find it highly commendable that the didjshop puts the aboriginal people their culture and values ahead of rank commercialism and base marketing.

Monica from Spain

No

Well I knew that other people made didgeridoos also but I thought that aboriginal people were mostly the manufacturers of it. Actually it would be interesting that they make most of them just to incorporate their culture much more.

Nancy Runyan from USA

No

I didn't know the statistic but I am not surprised. It is unfortunate historical fact that a great deal of the wealth accumulated in well-off Western countries has derived from the lands and resources that originally belonged to the indigenous people. Here in the US -it's the Native Americans that were relieved of their lands and culture.

Nathan from USA

No

I don't that a didge necessarily has to be made by Aboriginal people as long as they know what they're doing and take pride in the art and culture. Non-Aboriginal people that make didges then claim them to be Aboriginal made should be shot.

Anonymous

No

Amazed

Pamela from USA

No

I think it is terrible that companies don't hold true to the origin of didgeridoos

Parker from USA

No

Sad commentary on humanity

Anonymous from USA

No

I don't know. Not all guitars are made by guitarists nor do they receive any extra money.

Anonymous

No

Sad

Patty from USA

No

I think it is a bad deal

Paul from Australia

No

It's unfair for the Aboriginal Culture and the people

Paula from USA

No

This is terrible-another example of society taking over and imitating.

Peggy Gorman from USA

No

I think this is a disgrace

Pete from United Kingdom

No

I think it is disgusting

Anonymous from USA

No

Nothing is made like it should be anymore.

Randy Wilson from USA

No

I live in the Southwest United States and I see the money being made on "Native American" art all the time. I've been on the reservations and I see how poor some of the people are so I've seen the imbalance of it all.

Ravinderjit Singh from Malaysia

No

Quite outraged. It's their culture and heritage and something must be done to stop this from happening.

Anonymous

No

Great!

Rev Sheree Hennessy from Australia

No

I feel it is both unjust and unfair all monies should be returned to the artists in question as it is their heritage on display and is very relevant and significant to australian culture.

Richard Bernard from France

No

Makes me sad and It might make me ask for revenge so many have always be stolen and it still goes on. It is not lost only for Aboriginal people but for the others too.

Richard from Peru

No

The didj is a very spiritual instrument and I feel every one can gain from its benefits

Risa from USA

No

It's a crime to steal. This is stealing cultural icons and misrepresentation by those committing the theft.

Robert Barriga from Mexico

No

I FEEL that it is disgraceful I saw a website for a french dude showing him cutting down at least 20 trees to make didjes. Native art should be made by natives otherwise you don't get the real SOUL.

Anonymous

No

Sad

Anonymous

No

Most French horns aren't made by French people. Most Native American Flutes aren't made by Native American people. They are musical instruments. Anyone can make them and anyone can play them.

Roger from USA

No

I think that proper legislation could create a niche market that could do a lot of good for the Aboriginal people.

Ron from USA

No

I don't think that didges HAVE to be Aboriginal but the origin should be clearly and honestly represented.

Ronald from Netherlands

No

Original didj sounds better

Ronald Jonker from Netherlands

No

A pity but it helps making didges popular around the globe...

Anonymous from USA

No

Sad

Anonymous

No

I'm actually disgusted to know that

Ryan Anderson from Australia

No

While I am in favour of the didgeridoo's growing worldwide appeal I believe more credit and finance is due to the indigenous Australian people for their unique and wonderful musical gift to the world.

Sam Maize from Canada

No

I think that 100% percent of the didjes sold should be made by aboriginals. And they should get large piece of the profit.

Sandra Riley from USA

No

I feel it's wrong.

Scott from USA

No

SITUATION NEEDS to be addressed

Anonymous

No

Sad

Shaun from Canada

No

It is terrible especially when these didj's are sold under false pretense so individuals who think they are buying a real one get duped.

Shawn Mcdonald from USA

No

I guess some people in this world do not mind taking the food out of the mouths of families for there own personal gain. It is a shame.

Anonymous from USA

No

Sadly this is a case of "Cultural Exploitation" a deal where businesses cash in on a cultures heritage through exploitation of cheap consumer products that mimic real cultural instruments. The Didjeridu in Aborigines case...

Anonymous

No

That's great!

Anonymous

No

I think it's shameful!

Sheila from USA

No

Doesn't seem right

Anonymous from USA

No

It is not right that the people who brought us so much get so little from it.

Anonymous from United Kingdom

No

I believe that maybe 5-10% of profits could be given to aboriginal people

Sonia Gelov from Australia

No

This is very upsetting!! You would think it would have to be made by an Aboriginal!! There should be a law stopping this...

Stephen from Canada

No

I feel that who ever fails to research the product that they are purchasing is lacking the knowledge needed in supporting sustainable practices.

Stephen Scott from USA

No

I would love to see more people who make / sell didgeridoos to help support the Aboriginal people of Australia as with all indigenous cultures who have been and continue to be displaced. I am happy that more and more didges are available for people to experience whether thru playing or simply hearing. The healing qualities of the didge are a beautiful gift of the earth given thru the Aborigines. While there are more experiences of these traditions throughout the world I must wonder how can the cultural aspect be removed so easily? Respect in one form or another would be wonderful to see more and more of in relation to getting didges out to the people.

Anonymous

No

Saddened

Steven Bolton from USA

No

That the majority that are indonesian or some similar places imports and ones of that manor are a bit of an injustice and at the least a slight misrepresentation as those countries don't have anything to do with didgeridoos

Anonymous

No

Would prefer to support Aboriginal people

Susan from USA

No

I don't know I had never heard this.

Suzy from USA

No

Meh.

Anonymous from USA

No

My guess is that they are made in China like everything else. That one fact is the major downfall of all countries.

Thomas Gonzalez from USA

No

I'm not surprised. I guess I assumed that anyone actually serious about playing wouldn't settle for anything but authentic.

Thomas from USA

No

A hard sad fact of commercialism. the good guy is always getting screwed

Tim from USA

No

It is very disturbing unfortunately not surprising.

Todd Walden from USA

No

I'm impartial. I don't think the sale of Didjes should be limited to aboriginal people. That doesn't make sense to me.

Tony from United Kingdom

No

It's diabolical but the big (and small) companies out to make a quick 'buck' have no morals nor ethics and probably don't give a hoot about the Aboriginal people.

Anonymous from USA

No

It's horrible

Anonymous

No

I think it's wrong

Anonymous

No

I find it a bit surprising

Ulla from Denmark

No

I think that it is bad because the Aboriginal people used their old knowledge to produce the didgeridoos. Now anyone else copies Didgeridoos without paying for this old knowledge.

Anonymous

No

It's a sad fact.

Anonymous

No

Interesting

Anonymous

No

Wrong I would only want to have one made by Aboriginals

Anonymous from USA

No

I think it's a shame since it is their design and originally made by the Aboriginal people.

Wallace from USA

No

This is very upsetting.

Zak from USA

No

I think it's terrible. This is an instrument that was created by Aboriginal people and they should be the ones in control.

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Check out other selections of our visitors' comments:

GENERAL DIDGERIDOO ISSUES

DIDGERIDOO AUTHENTICITY

DIDJSHOP COMMENTS

TRADITIONAL DIDGERIDOO PLAYING

EFFECTS OF DIDGERIDOO PLAYING & LISTENING

ABORIGINAL ISSUES

 

If you have any question you would like us to ask our visitors, please let us know.

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